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post #31 of 38 (permalink) Old 12-12-2013, 11:32 AM
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Photoshop is nice for things as you have exampled there above, what makes a good shot is the person behind the lens, I would agree on the No PS rule myself, When I was in Club back in the days, YES way back LOL, we didnt have PS or digital, All Old school. You needed to be able to read a meter and understand F stops and shutter speed correlation then

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post #32 of 38 (permalink) Old 12-12-2013, 11:44 AM Thread Starter
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Very true. It still takes skill to visualize the shot, set it up, shoot it. the editing just put the quality up another notch.



One of the guys we have here who is retiring and moving to Belize gave my department a bunch of old photo books. While the shots were good. by todays standards they are total crap.
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post #33 of 38 (permalink) Old 12-12-2013, 12:38 PM
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This thread really helps people like myself, who don't know squat about photography.

I bought a used Nikon d5100 off craigslist, it came with two lens (55-200mm and 18-55mm). Still in really good shape. I don't know how to use it really.

Do you use any UV filters?

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post #34 of 38 (permalink) Old 12-12-2013, 12:47 PM Thread Starter
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UV filters are mainly just used as lens protectors now a days. UV light does not effect DSLRs like it did the old school film cameras.

Sometimes ill use polarizing filters tho. My advice would be to not use auto mode on your camera and use the Aperture Priority Mode (A or AV), or Shutter Priority Mode (S or TV). There is different uses for each of these settings.

The first one A, or AV is where you control the Fstop which then allows you to control depth of field. (this is what i use for most still vehicle shots) Lower the number, the more background blur you will get.

the second setting, S, or TV is where you control the shutter speed. which is useful for say sports or action shots. sometimes you want to capture a car moving and have the backround blured to give the feeling of motion, for this you will want to use a slower shutter speed. or say if you want to freeze action you will want to use a faster shutter speed.

Keep in mind that there is a ton of different variables and times blah blah blah to use these settings. you more or less need to go out and practice using each setting and learn what makes what work out the best.
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post #35 of 38 (permalink) Old 12-12-2013, 12:57 PM
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Already learning a lot, thanks!

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post #36 of 38 (permalink) Old 12-12-2013, 01:04 PM Thread Starter
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No prob. the ultimate goal is to shoot in full manual mode so you have complete control over your shot. For lots of shots i will use full manual. but the AV or TV (canon), or A or S (nikon) are excellent for quick shooting with good results.
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post #37 of 38 (permalink) Old 12-27-2013, 12:20 PM Thread Starter
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Added this link from a wrx forum im on.. it is very well written.

Armin’s Quick and Dirty Tips and Tricks to Automotive Photography

Last edited by Blackcloud556; 12-27-2013 at 12:26 PM.
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post #38 of 38 (permalink) Old 06-24-2014, 08:42 AM Thread Starter
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I wanted to add some more information to this thread about the Rule of Thirds in photography to help you guys compose your images better in an effort to make them more compelling.

All info taken from here
Rule of Thirds - Digital Photography School


Perhaps the most well known principle of photographic composition is the ‘Rule of Thirds‘.

The “Rule of Thirds” one of the first things that budding digital photographers learn about in classes on photography and rightly so as it is the basis for well balanced and interesting shots.

I will say right up front however that rules are meant to be broken and ignoring this one doesn’t mean your images are necessarily unbalanced or uninteresting. However a wise person once told me that if you intend to break a rule you should always learn it first to make sure your breaking of it is all the more effective!

What is the Rule of Thirds?

The basic principle behind the rule of thirds is to imagine breaking an image down into thirds (both horizontally and vertically) so that you have 9 parts. As follows.



As you’re taking an image you would have done this in your mind through your viewfinder or in the LCD display that you use to frame your shot.

With this grid in mind the ‘rule of thirds’ now identifies four important parts of the image that you should consider placing points of interest in as you frame your image.

Not only this – but it also gives you four ‘lines’ that are also useful positions for elements in your photo.



The theory is that if you place points of interest in the intersections or along the lines that your photo becomes more balanced and will enable a viewer of the image to interact with it more naturally. Studies have shown that when viewing images that people’s eyes usually go to one of the intersection points most naturally rather than the center of the shot – using the rule of thirds works with this natural way of viewing an image rather than working against it.

In addition to the above picture of the bee where the bee’s eye becomes the point of focus here are some of examples:




Another Rule of Thirds Example

In this image I’ve purposely placed the head of my subject on one of the intersecting points – especially his eyes which are a natural point of focus for a portrait. His tie and flower also take up a secondary point of interest.



In this shot I’ve placed the subject along a whole line which means she is considerably off center and therefore creating an additional point of interest. Placing her right in the center of the frame could have resulted in an ‘awkward’ shot.

In a similar way a good technique for landscape shots is to position horizons along one of the horizontal lines also as I’ve done with the following shot (I’ll let you imagine the lines).



Using the Rule of Thirds comes naturally to some photographers but for many of us takes a little time and practice for it to become second nature.

In learning how to use the rule of thirds (and then to break it) the most important questions to be asking of yourself are:

What are the points of interest in this shot?
Where am I intentionally placing them?
Once again – remember that breaking the rule can result in some striking shots – so once you’ve learnt it experiment with purposely breaking it to see what you discover.

Lastly – keep the rule of thirds in mind as you edit your photos later on. Post production editing tools today have good tools for cropping and reframing images so that they fit within the rules. Experiment with some of your old shots to see what impact it might have on your photos.
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