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Hey all.

I have a 2013 3500HD Sierra dually that serves as my daily driver as well as hauling our new Host Mammoth Truck Camper. The camper weighs 4300 lbs "dry" (according to the sticker - I think it's more) and will be in excess of 5k lbs when loaded.

I'd like to make some mods to improve the weight handling - air bags, sway bar, etc. I was hoping to change out wheels and tires to something with a higher load capacity, but would like to avoid going to a 19.5 inch wheel and tire. I've done that before on a previous truck, and while it was fine with the camper loaded, it rode like a buckboard when empty. I've been looking at 20 inch wheels and tires, and while finding a 20" tire that can carry a load isn't a problem, finding a 20" wheel that can carry a load has been. I can't find many that are rated more that stock load capacity (around 3300 lbs).

Any ideas or suggestions?'dunno;

Thanks!
Dave
 

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I think you'll find that 13,200 lbs of rated capacity is more than enough. Your rear axle weight rating is only 10k.

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why would you think a 20 inch going to ride better? not really going to gain much. stick with what you have you'll be fine.
 

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As you have already done the 19.5 route, I can also tell you from first hand experience that it takes a lot of effort to get the 19.5 set up to work and to be comfortable and bearable.

Without getting into all of the details, when you had the 19.5s did you use Centramatics, Road Force Balancing and Sulastic shackles? The use of all of these made a tremendous difference in the empty ride with my 19.5 Alcoas.

Just something to consider.
 

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I'm a bit puzzled so maybe sharing some more information would help.
You're finding 20" dually wheels that are not rated to carry enough load? Seems odd.
I'd definitely steer clear of the 19.5s if it were me. Those things are so stiff they're like cushion tires on a forklift. They're for HD hauling.
I used to carry an 11ft truck camper on a SRW 3500 with 17" rubber. No problems. It wasn't as heavy as your Mammoth but your dually should more than make up for the difference, in my opinion.
BTW, I'm jealous of your camper. My wife and I used to love our truck camper. We just decided we'd like to have a camper that we could drop at the campground then be able to drive the truck around without taking everything with us. Many times we've wished we had the truck camper back.
Good luck with whatever you decide.
 

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My brother has 20" american force dually wheels on his tow rig and according to him, they are a big improvement. I think bigger wheels are more stable than smaller ones though you will have less sidewall.
 

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What counts is the payload rating for the tires. My SRW came from the factory with tires rated at [email protected] PSI and changed them for ones rated at [email protected] PSI for gain in payload capacity of 1100 lbs at the rear wheels for 7500 lbs, which minus the 2800 lb weight of the truck left 4700 lbs payload capacity. With a 4,000 lb camper load in the bed (verified at a CAT scale) the bed was level and no sag.

There was sway with the factory springs but after I added a double leaf set of SuperSprings this problem was resolved and the shocks were more effective as travel was reduced. The Rancho XL adjustable shocks helped in that I could increase the restriction for the rear shocks with the camper in the bed and then take it to a mid-range setting when the camper was off the truck.

I added a Hellwig Big Wig sway bar and it has zero impact when there was a heavy load in the bed but but a very positive impact when the bed was empty. With nothing in the bed any bump or dip would result in wheel hop that was quite pronounced with a heavy duty truck. With the sway bar in place when one wheel hit a bump a good portion of the impact was spread to the opposite wheel and softened the overall impact for people in the cab.
 
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