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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in 2008 I had a 3/4 ton LTZ and had problems with it freezing/gelling up. I never had a problem starting it, but if it was 20 degrees and below, it would gel up despite winter/treated fuel and using Power Service once I started driving it. It NEEDED to have the winter front on it or it would gel up. Sometimes in Minnesota the temps go from 50 one day, to 20 or colder the next, so yes, I got caught a few times in the fall without the winter front on and gelled up.

I have owned many Fords and Dodges over the past 20 years and have never used a winter front on them, and had never had a truck gel up. I thought it might just be my truck - but ran into quite a few people in the shop that had the same problem.

I'm looking at trading my 2011 Ford F250 for a 2013 Chevy LTZ 3/4 ton. Does anyone know how the 2013's are in the northern freezing climates? Do they still need the winter front? Any problems with them gelling up? I did try to search the forum for related topics and didn't come up with much. If this has been discussed, please point me in the right direction to find the thread!
 

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I purchased a 2013 GMC Denali Dmax, and I have not ran with the cold front this winter at all. Had the truck in temps -20 without any issues at all.

I was out in the Big Horn Mountain range this past winter snowmobiling, and the truck sat for 4 days in sub zero temps without issue.
 

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-42*C is the coldest I have had my LML in this winter. Winter front on or off, fuel will not gel. Around here, all fuel stations add anti-gel to their bulk tanks.

If the tanks you are drawing from do not have anti-gel in them, it may be a good idea to invest in some for yourself.

Joker:thumb
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info so far! All of our fuel is treated at the gas stations I go to - and I use added treatment as well if it's going to get below zero farenheit. The Chevy is the only truck that I've had gel up - multiple times. Perhaps it was just a bad year for the Chevy's? Getting stranded is not fun and before I make the trade, I just want to hear how the 2013's have been behaving in the frigid temps.

Super B - that sounds encouraging!
 

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I have a 2012 duramax and there were a few times that it got down to 20 below here in utah. Never had a problem with it gelling up. I did still put an additive in every time I filled up this last winter.
 

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My 2012 Denali has had no winter front all winter in northern Canada and It has never missed a beat, no complaints at all, make the jump from ford you'll be happier then ever!
 

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whats this cold yall speak of?

dont think that is offered down here in houston

FML
You need to stay outa the Northerners threads with warm climate comments. Norhtern ILL. I've never had a problem
 

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its been -50 out here in nd since ive had mine. didnt even plug it in for one of the nights and it started and ran perfect. no winter fuel either
 

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I'm calling bullshit on starting perfectly in -50 weather on summer fuel. Summer diesel has a cloud point of about 0* and it gels bad around -10. I had a slip tank full of summer diesel when I was heading up north one fall and we hit a bad cold snap, I didn't put any fuel treater in it because I thought I'd put it in the main tank when I filled up. The fuel waxed so hard at -20 that it completely plugged up my 10mic filter on the slip tank.

Summer diesel at -50 is frozen, so you either unknowingly had winter diesel or you're full of BS.
 

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You shouldnt have any gelling problems unless the fuel u used isnt treated right. (winter fuel) & if u live in a cold state/city, station fuels should be treated for the winter. Also for added insurance add some of your own ant gel treatment & double the dose if its in the teens or below. The front grille cover isnt needed but its good to have on to keep the "beast" running @ optimum temp. The owners manual (I think) says to put the cover on (if u have 1) @ 0*F or below. When I lived in CO & WY id put my cover on when it be in the teens.
 

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My dads 2010 lmm whenever I've ran it in any cold temp all the way to -35c I had no troubles. Couple times I never had a front on it too yes the temp of the truck was down a little but no gelling That being said in winter I always carry a bottle of anti gell. Just as a absolute back up.
 

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I got my 2013 in Dec and didn't have any problems with fuel gelling this winter. One thing to remember is MN has 2% biodiesel all year long and bio is harder to treat for winter than regular diesel. The first winter of the mandated bio caused lots of gelling problems for all diesels.

Jay
 

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Most stations out here have signs that say winter fuel. The station that I go to says nothing anywhere. Maybe they do have there own additive. Couldnt tell you. Either way not plugged in. In that temp I think is pretty impressive. That was when I first got the truck. Since then I run additive in every tank because the fuel out here is garbage
 

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What i found:
The advent of Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel (S-15) means that the high sulfur Jet A and the Kerosene’s used for home heating can no longer be used for blending with on-road diesel fuels. This means that the refiners and distributors will need to produce and stock an Ultra- Low Sulfur #1 Fuel for blending purposes.

Non-winterized diesel fuel will not generally cause problems as long as temperatures are at or above 10 deg. F. The addition of about 15% to 20% Diesel Fuel No. 1 to Diesel Fuel No. 2 will reduce the cloud point of the fuel by about 5 deg. F.

The fuel heaters on the truck extends the temperature - lower from what I understand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
My 2008 had gelling issues as well. My 2013 has not and no winter front.
Thanks Cowdocdvm - that's what I was wondering! I think a lot of the '08's had problems. Was hoping the problem was fixed on the '13's. In 20 years of owning many Fords/Dodges - the '08 Chevy was the only one that ever gelled up (had it happen two winters in a row before I traded it), despite using the same additives and treated fuels that I used in the other trucks.

Time to go work a trade!!! It's good to hear those 2013's are doing well in the cold weather.
 
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