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I never had a truck with an exhaust brake, so when do you use this "exhaust brake" and how does it work?
 

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Use it when towing especially down step grades. The turbo veins are designed in that when you let off the go pedal it actually helps build up back pressure in the engine putting resistance on gasses that are trying to evacuate out the exhaust. This resistance creates a breaking effect of sorts which decreases the amount of actual braking needed by the driver. Works fantastic.


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Thanks for the reply. Are there any drawbacks to using it all the time or should I limit it's use to when I really need the extra braking?
 

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Thanks for the reply. Are there any drawbacks to using it all the time or should I limit it's use to when I really need the extra braking?
Don't use it on a very slippery road surface. Because the braking force is applied on only the driven wheels, the contact patch at those wheels has to withstand much greater static friction than when using the service brake to apply an equivalent braking force. Under icy conditions it could put you into a drive wheel skid.

The point of the system is to reduce the amount of heat your service brakes have to dissipate, because on long downgrades with a heavy trailer you run the risk of exceeding their heat capacity which results in brake fade, and possibly an out-of-control or runaway truck.
 

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Thanks. What you said sounds like very good logic. I will drive advised and this may save me from an accident.
 

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It is the first thing I turn on after I start my truck!!! I put 186,000 miles on my 11 truck and used it everyday, I have 12,000 on my 19 truck there is no reason not to use it all the time other than icy conditions. Using tow/haul changes your shift points and turns on the engine braking feature so why use it when you can just turn on the braking portion?? This is just my $0.02 worth your experiences may differ.
 

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It is the first thing I turn on after I start my truck!!! I put 186,000 miles on my 11 truck and used it everyday, I have 12,000 on my 19 truck there is no reason not to use it all the time other than icy conditions. Using tow/haul changes your shift points and turns on the engine braking feature so why use it when you can just turn on the braking portion?? This is just my $0.02 worth your experiences may differ.
Yep same here, it's the first thing I turn on after I start the truck, save for the icy condition mentioned. Been doing it that way on my last 3 trucks and it is a huge brake saver for me as I live in a very hilly area. There is really no reason not to use it. I just wish it wasn't a momentary switch so I could just leave it on. One thing I will say though is the EB on my 19 is vastly more aggressive than my 12 or my 16 were. It will actually jerk you forward when it engages at certain times. Damn near slows me down to a stop at times, which is fantastic.
 

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I wouldn't use it all the time, if you want to save your brakes when driving around unloaded I would just switch into tow/haul mode when stopping.
It is the first thing I turn on after I start my truck!!! I put 186,000 miles on my 11 truck and used it everyday, I have 12,000 on my 19 truck there is no reason not to use it all the time other than icy conditions. Using tow/haul changes your shift points and turns on the engine braking feature so why use it when you can just turn on the braking portion?? This is just my $0.02 worth your experiences may differ.
I think the only "engine braking" associated with tow/haul is due to the torque converter lockup. Tow/haul locks the torque converter in gears 2-6, which basically eliminates the viscous torque converter losses (i.e., heat dissipation and wear).

I don't see any reason not to use the EB all the time (aside from icy/snowy roads as discussed), but I don't know that much about the system's actual implementation to have a strong opinion. If it's bad to use it "all the time" then I guess these trucks must be worthless as commercial/hotshot rigs...which contradicts many of our members' experience.

Personally, I use T/H and EB when towing, and I disable them when unloaded. The only reason I leave them disabled is because the truck drives more like a car without them, which I prefer when I'm using it for normal car duties.
 
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