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I have trucks to use so rarely even review what the mfr recommends for payload or any of that. LIke someone said previously, if it fits in the bed, it goes in the bed. And for those thinking of lecturing me and others about being sued in the event of an accident, save it. I don't care. You can be sued for anything whether or not your'e braking the law or loading your truck beyond the mfr's recommendations.

That said, I saw a 2500 or 3500 SRW service truck going down the road earlier. It was squatting noticeably in the back end. So I got to thinking, you know, you see service trucks everywhere - plumbers, electricians, HVAC techs, truck mechanics, etc., etc. How many of these trucks do you reckon are loaded within the mfr's recommendations? A good steel service bed alone with boxes down both sides probably eats up most of the available payload. Then you start loading tools, equipment and supplies? Probably most of them are loaded beyond the mfr rating, many of them well beyond.

Maybe I should start pulling them over like a citizen's arrest and lead them to a scale to weigh?;)
 

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I bought a 2020 3500 srw and it's over 3000 not sure exact number but I looked after I read this and it was over 3k sorry this doesn't help the 2500 matter lol
 

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The payload is calculated by all the truck manufacturers based on how the truck is configured when it leaves the factory and that includes the load capacity of the tires and wheels and leaf springs. A regular cab will have the highest payload as the calculations subtract 150 lbs per passenger in producing the payload rating. Makes sense that if a crew cab can hold 5 passengers that this adds to the load on the wheels and tires and the is less weight that can be carried in the bed of the truck.

In general the larger the wheels provided the lower the payload rating of the tires that can be put on the truck and still have adequate clearance. When shopping for my truck I saw lots of 3500 trucks with lower payload ratings than the 2500 trucks and the problem was the fancy wheels and tires ordered with the trucks to boost the MSRP.

My truck's factory tires were rated for 3095 lbs or a total of 6190 lbs at the rear axle. The truck weight was 3200 lbs and the factory payload rating was 2800 lbs for the truck. I changed the tires and added SuperSprings and brought the safe payload capacity to over 4000 lbs at a total cost of $1100. Towing a 5th wheel trailer I would be limited to a maximum trailer weight of 16,000 lbs gross.

More trailer weight than that and I would need to go to 19.5 wheels and tires. Actually with my truck I would keep the gross trailer weight to 13,500 or less to provide an added margin for safety.
 

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Maybe I’m confused, it has happened before...but in this case I don’t think so. The sticker in glovebox in mine clearly states that it is for a “slide in camper”. Mine indicates a max of 2406 pounds for a “slide in camper”. The sticker on the door jamb indicates max payload of 3156 pounds. These numbers also match the specs on the GMC website and manual.
 

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Maybe I’m confused, it has happened before...but in this case I don’t think so. The sticker in glovebox in mine clearly states that it is for a “slide in camper”. Mine indicates a max of 2406 pounds for a “slide in camper”. The sticker on the door jamb indicates max payload of 3156 pounds. These numbers also match the specs on the GMC website and manual.
You are confused. The sticker in the glovebox; and mine has the same one, is exactly what it says, for a slide in camper. Slide in campers have a high center of gravity; and that’s part of why that number is different than the door jamb sticker, because I believe they’re trying to compensate for that lack of stability. GVWR minus curb weight equals payload rating...which should be pretty close to what your door sticker says- mine’s definitely in that ball park.
 

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You are confused. The sticker in the glovebox; and mine has the same one, is exactly what it says, for a slide in camper. Slide in campers have a high center of gravity; and that’s part of why that number is different than the door jamb sticker, because I believe they’re trying to compensate for that lack of stability. GVWR minus curb weight equals payload rating...which should be pretty close to what your door sticker says- mine’s definitely in that ball park.
yeah...maybe I wasn’t clear. I thought someone else was saying the sticker in the GB was the trucks payload rating. It is, but only relative to a slide in camper for the reasons you stated. The sticker on door jam is the correct payload for other uses.
 
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