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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This new to me o6 Dmax is due the 50K Transmission filter and fluid maintenance. I looked for a DIY thread that just covered the basics and didn't see one. Did I miss it or can anyone give me a quick step by step of what is necessary & any tips? How many qurts a fluid will I need etc? After the Stealership wanting $44 for the transmission filter I decided to try the Allison authorized dealer repair place sure enough new filters for $11. Thanks in advance.
 

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I will be doing the same maintenance soon and have same questions. If you need answers now ask Jesse @Husker Diesel or Tyler @ Myer performance. Or Mr. Manners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
To get a definitive answer I talked to the tech specialists at Allison on their toll free line. As you might guess very knowledgble and helpful. They said for an 06 Duramax it depended on the S/N as to what GM used for fluid in the Allisons. It also depended on S/N as to how much fluid, he claimed for the stock 06 Chevy duramax most likely it would be 7.6qts for drain and refill. They were shipped dry to GM. GM recommends DexVI now. Allison recommends Transynd. At any rate under average driving and towing conditions at 50K miles all that is needed is drain the pan and replace the screw on filter (don't lose the magnet). Thats it. Repeat again at next 50K with Transynd. At that point Allison considers the transmission to be fully synthetic and fluid is good for 150K but still need to replace the screw on filters at 50K ( or 25K if severe conditions). Hope that helps other newbies like me.
 

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I have read through the Allison guide posted by bigdaddydiesel a while back. I change my spin on every 10k, cheap peace of mind. For fluids I went with AMSOIL Torque Drive because it formulated just like Transynd and comes recommended from AMSOIL for the Allison's. That said, some very heated debates have ensued lately regarding what best to use, Dex VI, Transynd, Torque Drive etc. My recommendation is do your research and find what suits you.

After speaking with Tech Support today about Torque Drive, AMSOIL is recommending the same drain intervals based on the latest guidance from Allison. That means 150k miles, 4000 hours or 48 months of general use. 75k miles, 3000 hrs or 36 months of severe use. According to the individual I spoke with today, the main reason AMSOIL Torque Drive is not on their approved list of fluids is because AMSOIL knows they are meeting the specifications of Transynd but is not willing to pay Allison to prove that they do.

I leave it up to you and hope that this does not start another debate... After finishing your research and your choice is AMSOIL, PM me. I will do my best to take care of your lubrication needs and save you money with wholesale pricing.

Take care,
 

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I'm coming up on my 50k and was planning amsoil torque drive.Is anybody running a mag-hytec deep pan? Is it worth it? I'll only be towing 10k max 4-5 times a year and hitting the strip 4-5 times a year.Any thoughs??
 

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I'm coming up on my 50k and was planning amsoil torque drive.Is anybody running a mag-hytec deep pan? Is it worth it? I'll only be towing 10k max 4-5 times a year and hitting the strip 4-5 times a year.Any thoughs??
I personally don't have one but have heard they allow your tranny to run a little cooler. I tow 7-8k about as much as you tow. I don't remember a time where my temps went over 175 for the tranny and I am using Torque Drive.
 

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Yeah I was debating because my tranny already takes too long to warm up on cold days,I don't want it taking longer because of more fluid.
 

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Well, I just got a truck that has 200k miles. I don't know when the last time it was changed. Is it safer to change it, if it has never been changed? Just askin because new fluid would create more pressure right? And is it wise to put that extra pressure on the tranny if the fluid is 150K overdue?
 

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deep pans are great...... summer they work well, winter it takes a little longer to get to operating temp..... anytime you can add more fluid, ita a good thing
 

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Well, I just got a truck that has 200k miles. I don't know when the last time it was changed. Is it safer to change it, if it has never been changed? Just askin because new fluid would create more pressure right? And is it wise to put that extra pressure on the tranny if the fluid is 150K overdue?
If you don't know the service history I would do the hoot flush with that many miles.

CALLED THE "HOOT" METHOD:previous posts indicate: Stock shallow pan capacity-7.4 qts when drained.
Large pan capacity-7.4 qts. + 3.2 qts.=10.6 qts.
Total capacity-(dry system) shallow pan=12.7 qts.
Total capacity-(dry system) deep pan=15.9 qts.

When I drained I measured approximately 8.2 quarts (including residual fluid in factory pan, oil out of spin on filter, and oil that ran out when pulling suction filter and disconnecting transmission line.


Parts Needed:


• Fluid four to five gallons
• Spin-on filter


Tools Needed:

1. Two feet of 5/8 heater hose
2. 13mm & 15mm socket, and 3/8 ratchet or equivalent
3. Torque wrench- 3/8”
4. Empty three gallon containers—2 ea
5. Safety Glasses
6. Plenty of rags
7. Very small screwdriver



Procedure:

Remove and replace spin on filter—prime if you like.
Don’t forget to transfer magnet from old to new filter, wipe magnet very clean before installing in new filter.

Keep track of what you drain out of the trans. This will come into play later.


Install drain plug and tighten to 25 foot pounds.

Pour approximately 11 quarts of oil in transmission.

Disconnect upper line from trans cooler at the transmission.
These lines are on the passenger side of the transmission, near the torque converter.
The lines are also identified on the side of the transmission

Quote from Hoot: “In case you haven’t seen the Jiffy-Tite style connector before: Slide back the plastic cover over the c-clip-shaped spring, then use a small screwdriver to pop the spring out of it’s groove. KEEP A FINGER ON THE SPRING AS YOU DO THIS, because those springs love to go flying off into some dark hole where you’ll never find it. Once the spring is out, just pull and wiggle on the line until it comes out of the fitting. As soon as you have the line out you can put the spring back into its groove so you don’t lose it-the line will snap right back into place when you’re done, even with the spring there. Be careful not to damage the o-rings when re-installing.”

Attach the two foot hose to the line you just unhooked and run into your other container. Make sure to push the hose on far enough to go past the ridge in the line. Have one person hold the hose while another starts the truck (unless you have remote) and a third person pour oil in the filler tube.

Turn the truck on and off until you run about one and a half gallons out of the line.

You will have empty containers (if you bought the one gallon size) that you can set inside of your second container, which you can run the hose directly into to measure your progress. Be careful the oil comes out pretty fast.

At this point check how much oil you drained initially and how much you drained in the flush. Subtract how much you drained from how much you added and shoot for a difference of 3.2 quarts. In other words you want 3.2 quarts more in the transmission then you drained out. If you have too much in the transmission run a little more out of the cooler line.

Once you are satisfied the oil level is close, reconnect the cooler line and make sure the line is firmly attached.

You should have the c-clip back in its original position before reconnecting the line.

When reconnecting the line it will “click” in position and may squirt you in the face with a touch of oil.

Start truck and look for leaks, then run the transmission through the gears a few times.

Put truck back in park and check level with dipstick. Should be full cold-if not add fluid.

Drive the truck enough to get the transmission warmed up and then check again-should be to full hot mark.
 
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