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Stanadyne

When I bought my '06 in 2008, it still had some warranty left at my first oil change, so I took it to a GMC dealership. Their service guy asked if I was running any additive. I told him no. He said that GM endorsed(?) Stanadyne to use since the fuel on the market was ultra-low sulfur, and my motor(LBZ) was designed for low sulfur. Ever since, then I've ran it in every tank, until Stanadyne was no longer sold in my area(don't know if they sold the company or just quit making it), now I'm running Opti-Lube XPD. Never had a fuel related problem. I've also never run bio-fuel. In my area of Oregon, the state even removed some of the tax on bio-fuels as an incentive to buy it, so it's always about 10c cheaper per gallon. But to me, saving only $3 per fill-up isn't worth the unknown of how it's treating my motor.

just my 2c.

Cheers!
 

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Bio diesel is a generally good thing. Ethanol gasoline is a generally bad thing. Let's don't confuse the two. If I could get high percentage bio diesel I'd use it. While on vacation in Oregon last fall I was able to get B20 and my engine loved it.

There may be engines out there which don't like bio-diesel but Duramaxes are not among them.
 

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I have been running straight bio ( B-100 ) for the past umpteen years, probably close to 15yrs.
The 03 LB7 had a rubber feed line to the CP3 that had to be changed out. It appears that GM hardened the replacement line because that one never got soft.
On the 07 LBZ, 390k and no issues, has the original CP3.
I also run B-100 in the Mercedes and often in the John Deere with no issues.
Bio does start to cloud up (wax crystals that clog the filter) when the temperature starts to drop, usually around 40* F. The Dmax has a fuel heater in the filter head that works quite well as long as you are driving, but stop over night somewhere and you are done unless you have a heater in the fuel tank.
When you buy diesel anti gel additive, it ONLY treats the diesel, it has absolutely NO effect on the bio. Several companies advertise that they have anti gel that treats bio, including Power Service Diesel Kleen, but they have no effect on the bio portion of the fuel. PrimRose Oil in Dallas Texas is the only one that sells an anti gel for bio that works half way decent.
Given a choice between bio and ATF for lubricity, I will take the ATF. I think the bio is better than straight diesel but is over rated for the claims of lubricity. I usually add about a quart of synthetic ATF to the bio tank, that also quiets the engine considerably.
 
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