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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone out there using the adapter from Nicktane or Karens Transport and the CAT 1R-1807 filter?

Wondering how cold weather may effect the flow since they do not have a bypass valve?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My centrifuge was probably one of the best upgrades I did to my truck, keeps my oil looking like new. I'm sure the cartridge by pass systems are
comparable.

I am always open to new ideas, I know that CAT makes a great fuel filter that I use on the airdog so naturally I thought the oil filter upgrade could be worth while?

They are huge in size comparison and would hold a lot more crap plus an extra qt of oil.

I dunno just seeing what people think and if there is anyone that uses them.
 

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I saw a video, where they analyzed the "sludge" from centrifugal oil spinner. It contained Zinc dithiophosphates, organic phosphates and acid phosphates; organic sulphur and chlorine compounds; sulphurized fats, sulfides and disulfides..... you know, basically your whole engine oil additive package.

Plenty of Hot Shot guys go 500k + miles with just the OEM spin on. The Duramax platform does not need to be "fixed".....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
All additives are in solution. The centrifuge, at best, creates G forces of around 3,000 times the force of gravity and cannot remove additives. It is like sugar mixed with coffee, it cannot be removed once in solution.
Spent additives, when mixed with soot, become additional wear particles and contribute to oil thickening. Only spent additive package in lubricating oil is removed along with soot and other debris by the spinner.

It’s to be remembered that additives deplete, that’s why we change oil. It is also a known fact that the dirtier the oil the quicker the additive pack will destruct. This explains why engine oil burn often stops or decreases and oil lasts longer soon after fitting a SPINNER centrifuge.

I would imagine the "sludge" and impurities become bound with the additives and detergents to help remove it which is what it is supposed to do isn't it? I would be willing to bet you would have the similar results if you tested the "sludge" in your regular spin on filter as well.

Centrifuges are installed on many large diesel engines to control soot. You know, the stuff that destroys your bearings.. I have 400k miles on mine without issue and my oil analysis prove that.

Why would some of the most expensive diesel engines in the world have a centrifuge if it hurt them?
 

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All additives are in solution. The centrifuge, at best, creates G forces of around 3,000 times the force of gravity and cannot remove additives. It is like sugar mixed with coffee, it cannot be removed once in solution.
Spent additives, when mixed with soot, become additional wear particles and contribute to oil thickening. Only spent additive package in lubricating oil is removed along with soot and other debris by the spinner.

It’s to be remembered that additives deplete, that’s why we change oil. It is also a known fact that the dirtier the oil the quicker the additive pack will destruct. This explains why engine oil burn often stops or decreases and oil lasts longer soon after fitting a SPINNER centrifuge.

I would imagine the "sludge" and impurities become bound with the additives and detergents to help remove it which is what it is supposed to do isn't it? I would be willing to bet you would have the similar results if you tested the "sludge" in your regular spin on filter as well.

Centrifuges are installed on many large diesel engines to control soot. You know, the stuff that destroys your bearings.. I have 400k miles on mine without issue and my oil analysis prove that.

Why would some of the most expensive diesel engines in the world have a centrifuge if it hurt them?
My question would be the cost of the system. Then weigh that against the cost of oil if you changed it at say 5000 miles (which is what I do).

One of the reasons I use that schedule is to remove by products of combustion which is what you are talking about. The other reasons is to make an easy to remember schedule, you know, 5, 10, 14, 10, etc.

If the cost of the system would the additional oil costs, there doesn't seem to be much point.

Perhaps those expensive diesel engines you talk about are using an extended oil change interval, possibly based upon Oil analysis?

If so, personally Id rather just change oil on my schedule................just my .02
 

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1.These diesels that come with a OEM centrifuge are designed from the beginning to use one. They probably bleed off full pressure oil ( before the regulator valve) to run the centrifuge. My LLY pump wouldn't probably spin the thing at all!

2. Lots of things that seem to "help" in theory, miss the mark when truly analysed. Do a UOA without the thing running.... and one with. The UOA's will probably be indentical, yet you pulled a cupful of "sludge" out of the spinner. The fact is the engine didn't really care about those tiny micron particles it captured.... did it?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think I spent around $150 for my setup.

I also like to change my oil on a regular basis because of shearing and it's cheap insurance even tho the analysis says its good even after 10k.

Guess it's nice to pull the dip stick and see clean oil.
 

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1.These diesels that come with a OEM centrifuge are designed from the beginning to use one. They probably bleed off full pressure oil ( before the regulator valve) to run the centrifuge. My LLY pump wouldn't probably spin the thing at all!

2. Lots of things that seem to "help" in theory, miss the mark when truly analysed. Do a UOA without the thing running.... and one with. The UOA's will probably be indentical, yet you pulled a cupful of "sludge" out of the spinner. The fact is the engine didn't really care about those tiny micron particles it captured.... did it?
I have one on my LLY. Its marketed by PPE diesel and taps into the oil system just before the filter.
 

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I have one on my LLY. Its marketed by PPE diesel and taps into the oil system just before the filter.
If you look at any of the literature provided by the centrifuge manufactures, they all state it needs 60 to 80 psi to function properly.

I dont know of many LLY's, especially ones over 100k miles, that will make that pressure consistently.
 

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Only time I can think of seeing pressure that high is in the winter during first start up lol. Running down the highway at 60, your probably between 30-40psi even. I think people over complicate things :/
 

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If you look at any of the literature provided by the centrifuge manufactures, they all state it needs 60 to 80 psi to function properly.

I dont know of many LLY's, especially ones over 100k miles, that will make that pressure consistently.
The one that PPE sells I think is made by someone else. It's designed for smaller low pressure systems. At one time I saw the same one in a magazine and looked them up. Do not remember the name of who actually made the one I saw, but it's specs were lower pressure and flow rate compared to the ones the big rig and stationary engines run.
 

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I have a 16 LML 3500 and just put the cat filter on. Also the PPE pan, flat bottom, and the Insane Diesel by pass filter that filters about 10% of oil on each pass down to 1 micron, all of the oil will go through the by pass about every 10 min at 55 mph. This all increases my oil capacity to 13 qt. What are your thoughts on this? Sorry to say I don't know anything about the centrifuge (oil filter/separator), but always learning. Would love to see a photo of it installed and info on how it works and installation instructions for the Duramax or where to find them.
 

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I have a 16 LML 3500 and just put the cat filter on. Also the PPE pan, flat bottom, and the Insane Diesel by pass filter that filters about 10% of oil on each pass down to 1 micron, all of the oil will go through the by pass about every 10 min at 55 mph. This all increases my oil capacity to 13 qt. What are your thoughts on this? Sorry to say I don't know anything about the centrifuge (oil filter/separator), but always learning. Would love to see a photo of it installed and info on how it works and installation instructions for the Duramax or where to find them.


https://www.ppediesel.com/shop/oil-centrifuge-filtration-kit-gm-6-6l-duramax-2006-2007-lbz-and-2007-5-2010-lmm-114010200.html
 

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What are your thoughts on this?
Thought #1. Plenty of Duramax's go millions of miles on Walmart oil and Fram oil filters.....

Thought #2. The Duramax is about the least picky diesel when it comes to oil and filtration.

Thought #3. We all need to do what makes us sleep good at night.

For me it's Mobil 1 oil, and ginormous, blue Donaldson oil filters.... and I sleep fine.
 

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why the hell would you pay inflated prices for CAT filters??? they are no better than anything on the market just paying for the CAT name.

Fleetguard, Donaldson ect are all the top suppliers that we run on Million dollar equipment just fine
 

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The oil is designed to hold very small particles in suspension until the oil is changed. A filter that is 100% effective at removing everything would not provide enough oir flow to protect the engine. I would also be wary of claims about filtering down to a given micron size. At least with fuel filters a 4 micron filter will allow particles up to 10 microns to pass through the media, particularly when the filter is new. Fuel as with air filters are least effective when brand new and before any loading of the media has taken place.
 
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