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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New 2019 L5P, learning all this good stuff.

Local station carries bio-diesel, another local place carries straight diesel.

Which do you run, and why?
 

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What % levels?
Where ya at?

Even most #2 'straight' Diesel is 'up to' B5 now.
B10/B20 is better for lube and cleaning the fuel system. I stock up whenever I run across it. Quietens things down.

But it has issues in colder climates with gelling, some say.
I wouldn't know, winter here is maybe 10-14 days, if it shows up at all. :rofl
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nebraska. Local guy who carries "straight" diesel has both #2 and #1 diesel. He blends in the winter...all the county vehicles run his blend...never issues with gelling.
 

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I think have to be careful with seals with bio and maybe emissions stuff. Wouldn’t do what manual recommends against. Get an old tdi for that even then it can have issues.

Or an old diesel truck !


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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I would try to stick to straight diesel on these newer trucks. Regen systems are sensitive and need high heat to clean out properly.
 

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I thought the new trucks were rated up to B20.

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I thinking regen issues are caused from the quality of these newer bio fuels. Made from different sources. IMO it's too inconsistent to be trusted.

It is not an engine issue. It's the after engine, exhaust system bio can cause problems with.
 

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Diesel supplement is your friend.

From the 2020 one:

Do not use a diesel blend containing more than 20% biodiesel by volume.

and

At temperatures below 0 °C (32 °F), avoid using biodiesel blends above 5% by volume. Using such a fuel
may cause fuel filter plugging, system gelling, and freezing, which may adversely impact vehicle starting.

Severe winter grade diesel fuel, such as 1-D diesel fuel or Arctic grade diesel fuel, can be used in extreme cold temperatures (below
−18 °C or 0 °F); however, doing so will reduce power and fuel economy.

Avoid using severe winter grade fuel in warm or hot climates. It can result in stalling, poor starting, and damage to the fuel injection system.

Fuels improperly blended for cold temperature operation may result in restricted fuel filters.
The vehicle is equipped with a fuel heating system to prevent gelling or waxing of conventional diesel fuel and biodiesel blends, but may not prevent all cases.

In case of severe winter conditions, the fuel filter may become clogged by wax naturally present in the fuel.

To unclog it, move the vehicle to a warm garage area and allow the
filter to warm up. The fuel filter may need to be replaced.


There is more in the diesel supplement, but you get the idea.
 

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Get ready Hook, front coming thru tonite headed your way. Couple days of fall then into winter!
 

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I run only the bio for two very good reasons.

1. It adds lubricity (even B5 adds more lubricity than the older LSD had) and NO additive on the market today bests it for lubricity.

2. it is an excellent cleaner for your entire fuel delivery system
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I put B20 in for my first fill. Going to see how it performs and MPG.

Owners manual says keep to less than 5% bio-diesel when temps get below 32 degree. Once the weather gets cold I am going to fill with straight diesel, and blend.
 

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I think have to be careful with seals with bio and maybe emissions stuff. Wouldn’t do what manual recommends against. Get an old tdi for that even then it can have issues.

Or an old diesel truck !
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
On that older truck if you simply swap out the braided 1/2" fuel lines between the tank and the CP3 you will b fine running the bio.

You can swap out the 3/8 return lines too but it isn't really necessary.
 

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New 2019 L5P, learning all this good stuff.

Local station carries bio-diesel, another local place carries straight diesel.

Which do you run, and why?


i prefer biodiesel, it lubricates better than standard diesel and its the same price. Bonus that your recycling some oil. There are some drawbacks like more risk of gelling though.
 

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I have used pretty much nothing but B-X? in my LLY for the past 5 or 6 years. Why? Because that's all they sell here in Oregon, even off-road is 5%-20% bio. I haven't had any issues related to bio and that time frame probably represents ~25K miles of towing a 5th wheel. On a recent trip to Colorado I ran a few tanks of non-bio diesel while towing and I noticed it made more black smoke, the bio gives off more of a brownish grey smoke if I really get on it. I always run a fuel additive with every tank and so far, everything seems to be OK. It doesn't get very cold here, maybe 25F so I've never had any gel issues.
 
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