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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many people feel that a college degree pays for itself, if it's worth getting/finishing etc?
How many have a college degree here?
If you do have a degree how many are working in the field they studied for?
Getting very tired of this liberal education process.


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I'm a firm believer in a college education. I'm in my junior at college and all of my friends have jobs lined up already. I have an internship starting in the summer. Most People that I know who didn't go to college don't have much job security, and or upward mobility in their jobs. Just in my family alone, there is a clear pattern (based on income) of who did and did not go to college. With today's competition, it's pretty difficult to find a job so you really need the degree to get the upper hand.
 

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I rekon a degree 'can' pay for itself, and it was worth it for me
I have a 2yr in electrical
I'm also in my career field

Now the wife on the other hand has a 4 yr and never could find a job in her field, and the loans are NOT payed off yet either....so that was a complete waste

I believe very strongly in trades and skills, either with or without more or less education, it is EXPERIENCE that you cannot buy, but that counts the most.....sometimes
 

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I am also a firm believer in trades and skills. My friends that are union workers in construction, diesel techs, welding, etc, none of them have gone to college and they are all doing very well for themselves. They do talk about fear of losing their job though and not being able to find work in something other than what the started in simply because they have nothing on paper saying what they can do. I think you really have to be smart when choosing a degree. some are useless while others are in high demand.
 

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A lot of HS grads are told "You HAVE to get a degree to get a job". Problem is, nobody ever told them you have to get a degree in a FIELD THAT'S NEEDED AND GROWING, otherwise you're going to be flipping burgers or counseling unmotivated dropouts. In my tech career I have worked for brilliant non-degreed scientists and clueless, inept highly educated idiots. If you have a passion for something, a degree is secondary. It is NOT a job guarantee so you have millions of college degreed grads who didn't know what they wanted to do so they took the easy, useless courses and got an easy useless degree. Do a little searching and you can find hundreds of sites like this one:
8 College Degrees with the Worst Return on Investment - Salary.com
BTW, I don't have a degree but my career involved many years as a non-degreed engineer in the high tech biz.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So I'm focusing on Business. It's not as "liberal" as some but to be honest here is my bitch fit (we are all entitled to one right)

Wife and (3) kids
Dealing with my disabilities from Iraq
-has a lot to do with my ups and downs in school
Between that the schedules of kids and my wife in completely exhausted. My overall GPA has gone down drastically over the years to a point of now it's prolonging my graduation.
Did part time from 2006-2009, 2010 I went full time and have been doing it since. My veteran (and most of yours) complex is that I don't quit and I don't plan on it this time either. The problem is justifying my time any further. Invested a ton of time and thankfully the VA is paying my school which I am grateful so don't get me wrong I am blessed. Just irritated exhausted and would rather still be in the Corps than this. That was my profession. This seems secondary.




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Skilled trades. There will never NOT be a demand for electricians, carpenters, plumbers, mechanics, etc.

University degrees are a waste of time and money. The only way they would make sense to me is with a full scholarship. Even then...

Had a bud get a full scholarship to the university here, after 2 weeks he quit and got himself into plumbing and heating. He's a fully ticketed red seal journeyman now who does extremely well for himself and only takes the work he feels like.

I finish my apprentiship this year, school starts in May, after which I too will be a ticketed journeymen with my red seal. I've never stepped foot on a rig site either. My first year I made double what I made any year previously.

Firm believer in skilled trades.
 

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I'm a Global Supply Chain Management major (Business Degree). This degree is pretty new and in High Demand. Because this degree is more focused, and new, my chances of getting a job is a lot higher. But I am also very involved in my university and get to meet a lot of people in the field. Almost every graduate with this degree finds a job within the first 90 days, if not sooner, after graduation. The accounting, finance, marketing, etc. majors, are all doing really well at my University. But, those are more focused and have their own credentials and certifications that come with them. Those who do not do well are the ones with "Business Administration" degrees. Its literally the most vague degree and pretty much qualifies you to manage a McDonalds. Look for whats in demand in your area. If you're not happy, look into doing something that floats your boat, or something you can apply to a career field that does float your boat. Don't just go after something for money.
 

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Skilled trades. There will never NOT be a demand for electricians, carpenters, plumbers, mechanics, etc.

University degrees are a waste of time and money. The only way they would make sense to me is with a full scholarship. Even then...

Firm believer in skilled trades.
University degrees are not crap, I dont think i would be able to do pharmacutical drug development without my degree in Biological Engineering.

I had a job set up before i graduated and now i will be paid to go back to school to get my masters and even my PhD if i want to.
 

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Yeah it's very hard to say they are a waste of time and money. My mom busted her ass paying for school. She graduated buried in debt.....she's now a partner at a large firm and makes over 500k a year. Both my Aunt and Uncle are the same way. My Father and both sets of grandparents didn't go to college and aren't nearly as well off as those in my family who did go to school. Father is a landscaper, grandfathers are vets and worked for General Motors. You just have to be smart about your field of study and bust your ass to find a job. Nothing is easy. Everybody will give you a different opinion based on their experiences. In my case, I have seen how far a degree will get you. Those who make good money right out of highschool and in a union will tell you otherwise and will laugh at those with a degree.
 

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This has always been a simple topic in my mind.

If you're going to school for a liberal arts degree, you're not going to be graduating with very many job prospects. The only arts degree at my college I would consider taking is economics, and I'm not even sure why it's part of the arts faculty. That being said, I do know a few people who have done an easy liberal arts degree (sociology, psych) just for an easy high GPA to help them enter law school.

However, if you're going to school for engineering, marketing, finance, accounting, chemistry, nursing, computer sciences, stats+math majors (seriously, if you're a good statistician, you can make A LOT of money, insurance actuaries make ridiculous amounts of cash), economics, etc. and you get good grades, there's a good chance you'll be graduating with good job prospects, and the ability to go back for either your masters or further specialization which'll create even better job prospects.

Of course, it happens that people graduate with the above degrees and never really find a job to their liking, and there's people who graduate with liberal art degrees who might just be making more money than anyone in this thread (so please save your anecdotal evidence about your father-in-law's cousin's boyfriend's sister who graduated with a degree in finance/law/whatever and now works as a clerk at Costco), but generally speaking, the above degrees are pretty damn worth it, especially if you work hard to find a job in your field, and not swamp yourself in student debt (which is something I don't understand, you have four months off every summer to work full time and you can easily work part time during the school year, I can understand taking on a little debt, but these people who have student debt in the tens of thousands I'll never understand).

The general idea behind college (in my mind, at least) is to work your mind hard now so your body doesn't have to work as hard later. Obviously this is my own anecdote, but I know a lot of guys in the trades who say they wish they would have gone to school, but then I also know a few guys who say they wish they just went into the trades instead of school. Some people just aren't cut out for school, and some just aren't cut out of trade work. World keeps spinning.

Personally, I say school is absolutely worth it and if you're presented with the opportunity to go to school and it won't financially cripple you, do it! You should never deny yourself a chance to better yourself. :neener
 

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BBA & I'm working in my field. I definitely get paid better for having it as well.
 

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I went to college for 7 years, too much partying and no degree. I have enough hours for 2 degrees. I believe that if you want to go into a so called professional field to be a Dr, Engineer, lawyer and so on, you do not have any other choice than a degree. I agree what some other members have said about the trades- as there will always be a need for them and a person can do really well working them!
All my buddies have degrees and I have gotten them jobs in my field of work ( Independent Insurance Adjuster) where no degree is required. I have respect for anyone who works hard for a living regardless of the financial status or how society feels about their jobs.

With all that being said, experience in any field is priceless regardless of your education!
 

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How many people feel that a college degree pays for itself, if it's worth getting/finishing etc?
How many have a college degree here?
If you do have a degree how many are working in the field they studied for?
Getting very tired of this liberal education process.


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Imo the degree doesn't but the networking you can do in college can.
 

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^^^I'm my case at least
 

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I've got my undergrad in business and am almost done with my MBA.

The answer to your question is it depends... depends on your field, depends on your location, depends on you networking ability/connections.

Certain fields won't even look at you if you don't have a degree, like mine. Finance.

Others you wouldn't think do, actually require them also.. I.e. upward mobility in government jobs is often linked to education level. You can cap out, and be stuck in a dead end job, for example. Other jobs, like being a cop, surprisingly are requiring a college degree in some areas as well.

Now, some of the most wealthy people i know don't have degrees. They're entrepreneurs in trucking, collections, construction, etc. So they learned through the school of hard knocks, and worked their tails off. But there's lots of risk there obviously.

So it really depends on what you want to do. Not having a degree is going to really limit you in white collar jobs. Blue collar jobs or trades, not as important obviously, unless it's a professional type of thing like engineering, geology, etc. You can make good money in the trades, as i'm sure LOTS of people on this site do... It is my opinion that not everyone should go to college. For one, if everybody went to college, it would diminish the value of the degree itself. Second, not everyone needs a degree to be successful in the line of work they are passionate about. One exception i guess would be a business degree, if you plan on owning your own business. Knowledge is power, but you don't need a degree to work for yourself.

Something certainly to be said also for the networking that comes with advanced degrees, especially as you're trying to figure out what you want to do. Peers and faculty are excellent sounding boards and sources of information, and sometimes contacts.

Biggest suggestion I can make with a degree though, is don't box yourself in. Keep your options open, and don't limit yourself in career choices. Also, too often people focus on "getting a degree" instead of learning. Knowledge and skills are what you should focus on attaining through advanced education, not a plaque for the wall.
 

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This has always been a simple topic in my mind.

If you're going to school for a liberal arts degree, you're not going to be graduating with very many job prospects. The only arts degree at my college I would consider taking is economics, and I'm not even sure why it's part of the arts faculty. That being said, I do know a few people who have done an easy liberal arts degree (sociology, psych) just for an easy high GPA to help them enter law school.

However, if you're going to school for engineering, marketing, finance, accounting, chemistry, nursing, computer sciences, stats+math majors (seriously, if you're a good statistician, you can make A LOT of money, insurance actuaries make ridiculous amounts of cash), economics, etc. and you get good grades, there's a good chance you'll be graduating with good job prospects, and the ability to go back for either your masters or further specialization which'll create even better job prospects.

Of course, it happens that people graduate with the above degrees and never really find a job to their liking, and there's people who graduate with liberal art degrees who might just be making more money than anyone in this thread (so please save your anecdotal evidence about your father-in-law's cousin's boyfriend's sister who graduated with a degree in finance/law/whatever and now works as a clerk at Costco), but generally speaking, the above degrees are pretty damn worth it, especially if you work hard to find a job in your field, and not swamp yourself in student debt (which is something I don't understand, you have four months off every summer to work full time and you can easily work part time during the school year, I can understand taking on a little debt, but these people who have student debt in the tens of thousands I'll never understand).

The general idea behind college (in my mind, at least) is to work your mind hard now so your body doesn't have to work as hard later. Obviously this is my own anecdote, but I know a lot of guys in the trades who say they wish they would have gone to school, but then I also know a few guys who say they wish they just went into the trades instead of school. Some people just aren't cut out for school, and some just aren't cut out of trade work. World keeps spinning.

Personally, I say school is absolutely worth it and if you're presented with the opportunity to go to school and it won't financially cripple you, do it! You should never deny yourself a chance to better yourself. :neener
You hit the nail on the head. Both of my grandfathers told me to go to school and spare my body the hard labor so I can do what I want when Im older. At first I didn't really listen to that logic...until I started landscaping....I'm twenty years old and have arthritis already. Who the F$#k has arthritis when they are twenty years old!? Landscaping for 6 years has shown me how bad I do not want to be working such a physically demanding job for the rest of my life.
 

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You hit the nail on the head. Both of my grandfathers told me to go to school and spare my body the hard labor so I can do what I want when Im older. At first I didn't really listen to that logic...until I started landscaping....I'm twenty years old and have arthritis already. Who the F$#k has arthritis when they are twenty years old!? Landscaping for 6 years has shown me how bad I do not want to be working such a physically demanding job for the rest of my life.
Arthritis at a young age is an medical auto immune disorder/inherited/old age disease not something you get from physical labor, if that were the case those that exercise/train to an extreme would have it also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I can't thank you guys enough. Great advice here. Maybe a good discussion will continue here. I'm going to finish but I want to help fellow veterans with horses. Giving back type of work. There are a lot of us out there that need that extra hand.


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