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I am new to this forum and diesel trucks. I bought a new 2019 Chevy drw in October. With cold weather coming on, I am looking for feedback from others who live in the Southeast on their use of anti gel additives. Should I use them or not? Thanks - Rick
 

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I usually add below 20 degrees. These new bio fuels the wax flakes tend to from in the teens.
 

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In the winter, I have mostly used the white bottle Power Service or sometimes Howes to protect the system against freezing. Currently planning to switch over to FPPF Total Power to see how that works.

In Georgia it is probably not generally cold enough to worry too much about your fuel gelling but there are other good reasons to use an additive year round. The biggies are to improve the lubricity of the fuel to protect your fuel pump and injectors, to help your system deal with water in the system, to clean the fuel injectors, and to increase the fuel cetane.
 

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There's an actual TSB out on this stating additives aren't recommended for the new engines. If customers so choose to do, because they can and will regardless, that only based non metallic, alcohol, or water emulsifiers. I had a printed copy somewhere from the dealership back when I first got to a colder climate and asked if I should use one or not. I do believe they just updated it to include the 2019 trucks.

(because someone will ask) emulsification- method, often using alcohol as the emulsifier, keeps water particles suspended in the fuel. Emulsification of water in the fuel can allow water to get past the fuel filter/water separator, in most cases causing damage to other components of the fuel system

All that as it may be, depending on the location, there are shady stations out there trying to overcharge for a crap product. I just got stranded for a day because my tank gelled up, good ol'garbage upstate NY. It took diesel 911 to get it clear of the filter and their conditioner product with quarter tank of legitimate winter blend and we're back and going, I also had it plugged in. We didn't see any gelling till it got to 0 degree and below weather, you should be ok in GA.
 

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Generally if you don't know if the fuel is "winterized" for use in cold temperature, then you must treat it yourself. Regional fuel suppliers many times will provide a mix of #1 and #2 (winterized #2) to prevent fuel problems if they believe its necessary based on expected low temperature in the region they supply. I operate in extreme cold so I found a local station station that mixes for use down to -20F, it was more expensive than other local stations. I fill-up there most of the time but when I travel out of town and know nothing of the fuel supplied, I use anti-gel and mix it myself. I use power service brand. I don't treat until it gets less than 20F all day. If I know its only going to dip below freezing at night and go back up above freezing during the day I skip the additive. However since you have to treat when you fillup as the fuel must be warm to mix with the anti-gel additive, you must predict what the temps will be in the future for the entire tank of fuel. When I had problems it always took at least an hour of hard driving to plug the filter. If this occurs you must change the filter and pour "911" into the tank which is power service emergency anti gel melt additive. It comes in a red bottle. 911 will melt the gel in the tank but won't melt the filter blockage as there isn't enough flow. Good luck.

Cinno
 

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Other good reasons for additives in L5P?

In the winter, I have mostly used the white bottle Power Service or sometimes Howes to protect the system against freezing. Currently planning to switch over to FPPF Total Power to see how that works.

In Georgia it is probably not generally cold enough to worry too much about your fuel gelling but there are other good reasons to use an additive year round. The biggies are to improve the lubricity of the fuel to protect your fuel pump and injectors, to help your system deal with water in the system, to clean the fuel injectors, and to increase the fuel cetane.
Given the frequent reports of injector problems, it seems logical to use an additive of some kind to clean and help them last longer, like countless others have done for their pre-l5p engines. The big question is do the benefits of using additives outweigh the the negative consequences of not using them such as changes in the DPF and potentially more frequent regens etc. I bought some Optilube Summer + to use year round with each tank full, but have not used it because of the many recommendions not to use additives. If it was just a matter of having better protection for the injectors and more frequent regens, I can live with the lower fuel economy if there are no other negative consequences. I'm still not sure which is worse and what I should do.

Thanks for everyones feedback - Rick
 
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