Chevy and GMC Duramax Diesel Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
2012 Lml bone stock with 15K miles:
I am currently getting ready to install the FASS 150 and would like to hear if I should plan on installing the FASS bulkhead 5/8" suction tube kit or is the factory pickup good enough to avoid starvation?

I would imagine since the FASS suction tube kit up-sizes from 1/2" to 5/8" and mounts its pickup tube at the same location as the factory pickup that there is no issues with this product??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Do not use the suction tube kit! I had one in my truck and it hit the fuel sender causing my fuel gauge to not read correctly. Also have heard of it causing the Fass to create too much pressure due to the method of return. Not to mention it's a PITA to install. I took my draw straw out and put a beans sump in. I'd buy the old style Fass with the fuel neck return and a sump. Thank me later. I also just thought about it. Being that yours is a 12 model you can probably keep your stock pickup.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Mines a 15 that has a smaller pickup. That's why I went that route.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
unknown known most
Joined
·
15,249 Posts
Get the fass 95, no need for a sump or anything else, it's quiet, good for 700-750hp and you won't be near that even with the max effort tune
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,228 Posts
My suggestion on installing a LP is to always try the stock pick-up first, see what happens before you jump into installing the draw-straw or sump.

Several have found that the stock pick-up works just fine even with the bigger LP's.

Now if your more of a racer then maybe the stock won't supply enough fuel, maybe.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,421 Posts
Get the fass 95, no need for a sump or anything else, it's quiet, good for 700-750hp and you won't be near that even with the max effort tune
X2. I installed a 95 with no additional parts. The engine burns only a small fraction of that per hour. The rest is returned to the tank and is recirculated 4 times per hour in my 26 gal stock tank. The only thing a 150 would do that the 95 does not is recirculate it 6 times per hour. This could actually increase the aeration/foaming of the fuel which causes the dreaded 1/4 tank issue. I have not experienced any such issue with my 95.

I do have one suggestion for the installation regardless of which pump you use. The instructions call for it to be mounted on the front left pickup bed bolt. My truck is a standard bed and the fuel filler hose prevented me from mounting the pump as high as I would have liked due to the hose being in the way of the horizontal mounting bracket piece. This causes the filters to stick down below the body on the side of the truck, which I did not like. I moved mine to the second pickup bed bolt. The horizontal bracket points back into the fender well of the left rear tire which I solved by mounting a 12" square of rubber flooring to keep the tire from throwing dirt/water on to the pump. It now sits high enough that it does not stick down below the body but I still have easy access to the filters for changing and water draining.

If you have a long bed this may not be an issue but it was for me.

In ANY event, you did good adding that FASS unit! It will pay huge benefits in the longevity of your fuel system components.

One last idea, I don't know what you plan on doing with the factory filter setup but my suggestion is to get an adapter which will allow the mounting of a CAT UHE filter. This is the finest filter available today that I can find. As a tertiary filter it further cleans the fuel after the FASS has done its best. Nicktane and others make adapters for the factory filter assembly and Nicktane also makes a plate adapter which will allow deletion of the factory filter assembly and its related O rings which will eventually leak.

Just my opinion, and it is worth what you paid for it. GOOD LUCK!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
407driver thanks for the response; much appreciated. You wouldn't by chance have some pics of your installation and/or instructions??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,421 Posts
407driver thanks for the response; much appreciated. You wouldn't by chance have some pics of your installation and/or instructions??
I don't have any photos and I won't be able to get any for a couple of days, if you need them I will certainly try and get them to you when I am able.

As far as instructions.....the FASS installation bracket come in two pieces. One piece bolts to the truck using the bed bolt. The second one bolts to the first and to the pump housing with 4 bolts. It uses a rubber spacer between the mountings to dampen any vibrations so they are not transferred to your frame.

I removed the second bed bolt and used it to install the first part of the bracket. There is a hole in the sheet metal where I put another bolt through the mounting slot in the bracket to keep the bracket from twisting on the bed bolt. I don't know if that was absolutely necessary but I wanted to insure I didn't have problems of that sort down the road. The second or horizontal part of the mounting bracket has to be mounted with the slots facing rearward and they do extend into the wheel well area. It is not a clearance problem with the tire and wheel but it does intrude. I used a piece of 12x12 rubber flooring from Harbor freight, $1.99, cut a slit in it for the bracket and screwed it to the fender well. This keeps dirt and water from being thrown forward onto my pump and motor. I could have simply cut the bracket but that would have eliminated the end of the bracket which keeps the slots aligned, making fingers of the bracket instead of slots. If those fingers spread it would loosen the mount, more problems I wanted to eliminate before they happened.

After that it was a simple matter of hooking up the hoses and electrical connections as the FASS installation instructions describe. If you have not read them, do so, several times after you have the kit. they will make MUCH more sense once you can look at the truck and kit. Their pictures are very good and explanations detailed. If you have any troubles or more questions I will be more than happy to assist any way I can. I make my living as a professional helicopter pilot and my life depends on the reliability of the machine I sit in all day long, so naturally I want it reliable. I think this colors my thinking about reliability and mechanical problems into being too careful sometimes,...but I don't think you can ever be too careful.

One more bit of advice, I used slot #40 in the under hood fuse panel to mount my Add-A-Fuse. It is switched on with the ignition key and off as soon as you turn the key off. There are other locations that will work but most let the pump run for 10-20 seconds after you turn the key off. The pump still running was disconcerting to me so I moved it to #40. Also, you may be tempted, like I was, to put the FASS supplied 3 amp fuse in the top slot of the Add-A-Fuse. This is wrong. The 3 amp fuse goes in the bottom slot and the original 10 amp fuse in the top slot. I got this information direct from FASS in an e-mail when I asked them the question directly after reading other opinions that conflicted with one another. I figured the best answer would come directly from the manufacturer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the information. I think your explanations will suffice for now, but reserve the option to ask for future help if required. Thanks again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,421 Posts
I did find some pictures of the installation I had on my puter. I cropped them to make them small enough to upload. They show the installation from the side of the wheel well looking inward toward the front of the tire where I mounted the FASS95. You can see how the pump got dirty prior to my installing the rubber flooring piece. The last one shows how it is neatly tucked up behind the side of the bed and does not stick down as it did when I mounted it on the forward bed bolt.

I hope this helps.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,421 Posts
Thanks for the information. I think your explanations will suffice for now, but reserve the option to ask for future help if required. Thanks again.
No problem with future info requests. One last bit of advice, your FASS comes iwth a lifetime warranty to the original purchaser. It is VITAL that you register it with FASS within 30 days of purchase. You must have purchased it from an authorized FASS dealer. They will require a copy of the receipt from teh seller as well as registration information in the box. Without the registration it has a very short warranty.

Nobody told me this and I was lucky enough to purchase it from an authorized dealer on eBay, but it was purely luck. I would not save a couple bucks and lose the lifetime warranty if I were you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
[snip] Also, you may be tempted, like I was, to put the FASS supplied 3 amp fuse in the top slot of the Add-A-Fuse. This is wrong. The 3 amp fuse goes in the bottom slot and the original 10 amp fuse in the top slot. I got this information direct from FASS in an e-mail when I asked them the question directly after reading other opinions that conflicted with one another. I figured the best answer would come directly from the manufacturer.
You might want to double check that, unless they are using a different Add-A-Fuse, that is wrong. A few minutes with a meter will confirm this. The top slot goes to the new circuit; if you were to put the original fuse in the top and the new fuse in the bottom, the existing circuit would now have a fuse rated at less than 1/3 of what it was originally.

The line side (battery+) of the Add-A-Fuse is tied common, so if either one of the fuses were to blow, the remaining load will still get power. The contact furthest away from the red wire needs to go into the line side (battery+) of the original fuse position. If you reverse this, the the accesory you are adding will then have the power flowing through both fuses, and if the circuit you are tapping into is smaller than the circuit you are adding, you could potentially blow the lower fuse, rendering both circuits unusable.

Borrowed from Google:



Fuse in top slot





Fuse in bottom slot



 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,421 Posts
I thought someone might say I was not correct, so I saved the e-mail I received from FASS. It follows:

Hello-

I have attached a diagram of the wiring harness that come with the kit. There should be a 10 amp fuse in the wire coming from the battery going to the relay. In the diagram it shows a 15 amp which would be for one of our older HD pumps. The fuse tap in the fuse panel should have a 3 amp fuse and the fuse from whatever position was tapped in the fuse panel. The 3 amp fuse should be in the bottom slot of the fuse tap and the factory fuse should be in the top slot.

Thank you,

Gene Brown
FASS Technical Support
FASS Fuel Systems/Diesel Performance Products, Inc.
16240 Hwy O Suite B
Marthasville, MO 63357
636-433-5410 Ext 2962
636-433-5913 Fax

I double checked this by putting only the FASS fuse and omitting the factory fuse. The FASS pump ONLY worked worked when the FASS fuse was in the lower slot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
I can assure you that a decent multi-meter won't lie, or make mistakes. I just checked the Add-A-Fuse on my truck, it is the same as the one I have in the garage. Bottom: Existing load; Top: Additional load.

EDIT: I am not trying to say you are wrong, you very well could have one that functions that way, I have just never seen one that functions that way.

EDIT 2: Nevermind, I see you have the same one as I do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,421 Posts
You might want to double check that, unless they are using a different Add-A-Fuse, that is wrong. A few minutes with a meter will confirm this. The top slot goes to the new circuit; if you were to put the original fuse in the top and the new fuse in the bottom, the existing circuit would now have a fuse rated at less than 1/3 of what it was originally.

The line side (battery+) of the Add-A-Fuse is tied common, so if either one of the fuses were to blow, the remaining load will still get power. The contact furthest away from the red wire needs to go into the line side (battery+) of the original fuse position. If you reverse this, the the accesory you are adding will then have the power flowing through both fuses, and if the circuit you are tapping into is smaller than the circuit you are adding, you could potentially blow the lower fuse, rendering both circuits unusable.
Not wanting to give anyone any wrong information I just went out to my truck and pulled the ADD-A-Fuse. After removing the top fuse the FASS did not function. It was only when I put the fuse back in the top location did the FASS come on, so, I STAND CORRECTED! The FASS 3A fuse belongs in the TOP slot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Ha. May want to send that info right on back to Fass tech support.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
This is really good info on the add-a-fuse placement...I went on a "google quest" to find this very answer a few months ago...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I installed my FASS Titanium 95 at the second bed bolt just this weekend. It's a better place to put it, IMO, though it is closer to the rear wheel. Simple rubber mat to hide/protect it will go in soon as I can find the right one. My filters are out of sight from the side unless you get right down on the ground. Thanks all you guys for the help.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,228 Posts
I'd be installing a mud flap/rubber mat to protect it before you drive your truck.
Mines mounted at the AD suggested location, there's plenty of protection towards the rear of it and it's out of firing range from debris.
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top