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I ordered a Fass 95gph lift pump but the shop mis ordered and installed the 165gph instead. My 07 lmm has dpf delete. Idaho Rob efi live tune. I run mostly in the enhanced stock tune and use the 40hp for pulling 5r. Long road trips empty i use the 80hp (get. pprox 1.5gpm more) should I have shop get the 165gpm replace with what I really wanted? Just seems like a waste of circulation. Found out pump motors r exactly the same on both units just different pump.
 

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I ordered a Fass 95gph lift pump but the shop mis ordered and installed the 165gph instead. My 07 lmm has dpf delete. Idaho Rob efi live tune. I run mostly in the enhanced stock tune and use the 40hp for pulling 5r. Long road trips empty i use the 80hp (get. pprox 1.5gpm more) should I have shop get the 165gpm replace with what I really wanted? Just seems like a waste of circulation. Found out pump motors r exactly the same on both units just different pump.
if there charging you the 95 price for the 165, roll with it, if they want to charge you for the 165, make them fix the issue. The only difference is the number of times an hour the fuel tank will be filtered, 3 times on the 95 and 5 times on the 165. Your engine will only consume as much fuel as it needs regardless of the size of the lift pump.
 

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if there charging you the 95 price for the 165, roll with it, if they want to charge you for the 165, make them fix the issue. The only difference is the number of times an hour the fuel tank will be filtered, 3 times on the 95 and 5 times on the 165. Your engine will only consume as much fuel as it needs regardless of the size of the lift pump.
Sorry to hack your thread, I just want to ask you something, I have the CP4 and I've been reading on this to make sense of the issue, to avoid an issue on my 2016 Dmax, should I use a lift pump and additive? It seems everyone has a different opinion on this, my truck is bone stock and not planning on doing any tunning or deleting for now, I just came out of warranty and want to avoid a catastrophic issue, have a kid in college and dont have the extra $ to spend on not essentials, you seem to know what are you talking about, please advise.
 

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Sorry to hack your thread, I just want to ask you something, I have the CP4 and I've been reading on this to make sense of the issue, to avoid an issue on my 2016 Dmax, should I use a lift pump and additive? It seems everyone has a different opinion on this, my truck is bone stock and not planning on doing any tunning or deleting for now, I just came out of warranty and want to avoid a catastrophic issue, have a kid in college and dont have the extra $ to spend on not essentials, you seem to know what are you talking about, please advise.
the design of the pump is kind of the issue overall, wear particles in the pump get sent down the high pressure rails instead of returned to the tank, so the way as far as i understand to increase the life of the pump would be to limit the internal wear as much as possible. Based on the Spicer study biodiesel seems to have the best overall lubricity characteristics, so if you can get that where you are, run that. It will exceed the lubricity rating required by the pump. If you cannot get bio diesel, or just want peace of mind you can add an additive like Optilube or a different additive as well. Optilube did well in the previously mentioned study, some additives on the market actually reduced lubricity, so not all additives are equal. The lift pump will reduce some load on the pump, how much, well thats debatable, but the added filtration and water separation will reduce the overall amount of grit and water that goes through the pump and injectors which should extend the life of both. The CP4 by design will not last forever and every pump will eventually fail for the same reason. This is not untrue of the CP3 though, the difference is the CP3 will generally outlast the rest of the truck and drive train before letting go, where as the CP4 based on owner reviews appears to not be nearly as robust. That said, i believe the reports of failures galore are highly over exaggerated. Forums tend to consolidate people with problems, as you seek out answers for your issues. Its less likely that someone seeks out a forum to tell everyone how well there truck is working, and much more likely they are there to complain about a problem, so the poll on this forum is heavilly biased towards the side of failures. Even then, the poll only shoes a 10-12% failure rate and theres not really a major difference based on miles driven so to me, it kind of sounds like if you get a good pump your probably ok for a while. Personally i would run biodiesel if you can get it, add a little optilube to each tank and if you decide you want the peace of mind that comes with the extra filtration of the lift pump, get a 95 GPH pump and drive the wheels off the truck. If you really do not want the stress of the CP4 though there are kits you can get that will switch it for a CP3 for about 2 grand including the CP3 pump. Install if you dont do it yourself is around 1500-2000 depending on where you go and what kit you get. You would still want to take care of the fuel system with the CP3 because the injectors still need lubrication, but the pump would return metal to the tank in the event of a failure and you would be much less likely to have to replace the whole fuel system.
 

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the design of the pump is kind of the issue overall, wear particles in the pump get sent down the high pressure rails instead of returned to the tank, so the way as far as i understand to increase the life of the pump would be to limit the internal wear as much as possible. Based on the Spicer study biodiesel seems to have the best overall lubricity characteristics, so if you can get that where you are, run that. It will exceed the lubricity rating required by the pump. If you cannot get bio diesel, or just want peace of mind you can add an additive like Optilube or a different additive as well. Optilube did well in the previously mentioned study, some additives on the market actually reduced lubricity, so not all additives are equal. The lift pump will reduce some load on the pump, how much, well thats debatable, but the added filtration and water separation will reduce the overall amount of grit and water that goes through the pump and injectors which should extend the life of both. The CP4 by design will not last forever and every pump will eventually fail for the same reason. This is not untrue of the CP3 though, the difference is the CP3 will generally outlast the rest of the truck and drive train before letting go, where as the CP4 based on owner reviews appears to not be nearly as robust. That said, i believe the reports of failures galore are highly over exaggerated. Forums tend to consolidate people with problems, as you seek out answers for your issues. Its less likely that someone seeks out a forum to tell everyone how well there truck is working, and much more likely they are there to complain about a problem, so the poll on this forum is heavilly biased towards the side of failures. Even then, the poll only shoes a 10-12% failure rate and theres not really a major difference based on miles driven so to me, it kind of sounds like if you get a good pump your probably ok for a while. Personally i would run biodiesel if you can get it, add a little optilube to each tank and if you decide you want the peace of mind that comes with the extra filtration of the lift pump, get a 95 GPH pump and drive the wheels off the truck. If you really do not want the stress of the CP4 though there are kits you can get that will switch it for a CP3 for about 2 grand including the CP3 pump. Install if you dont do it yourself is around 1500-2000 depending on where you go and what kit you get. You would still want to take care of the fuel system with the CP3 because the injectors still need lubrication, but the pump would return metal to the tank in the event of a failure and you would be much less likely to have to replace the whole fuel system.

Great info J83, straight to the point. We have Bio Diesel here in Florida, I was just afraid to put anything other that what dealer reccomends with fear of ruining the engine of a 70k truck. Also I will research on the Optilube, seems the logic way to go, maybe in the future I will change to the CP3 and do a lift pump to help the engine perform better, appreciate your time and knowledge.
 

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Great info J83, straight to the point. We have Bio Diesel here in Florida, I was just afraid to put anything other that what dealer reccomends with fear of ruining the engine of a 70k truck. Also I will research on the Optilube, seems the logic way to go, maybe in the future I will change to the CP3 and do a lift pump to help the engine perform better, appreciate your time and knowledge.
no problem, if it makes you feel better i have run biodiesel for years now with no issue. granted a lot of that was on a LB7, but my LML gets biodiesel now as well. Some people say it is harder on the rubber fuel lines though.
 

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no problem, if it makes you feel better i have run biodiesel for years now with no issue. granted a lot of that was on a LB7, but my LML gets biodiesel now as well. Some people say it is harder on the rubber fuel lines though.
I was reading on Bio Diesel, do I have to change anything to be able to run it? they were people saying that the Bio will clog the original filter due to getting all the gunk out from the previous diesel.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
But if I'm only filtering 3 gph instead of 5gph wouldnt my filters last longer and less wear on pump as it only doing a third of the work so it too might last longer?
 

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But if I'm only filtering 3 gph instead of 5gph wouldnt my filters last longer and less wear on pump as it only doing a third of the work so it too might last longer?
I would venture to say that the filters may see more debris since it is circulating more but you also got to figure that since its already been filtered previously it shouldn't have that many contaminants in it to make a noticeable difference in filter life. As far as the life of the pump goes anything can happen but i saw a video where i believe it was air dog that had a pump at their shop that logged thousands of hours on it and it was still going running 24/7.
 

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I was reading on Bio Diesel, do I have to change anything to be able to run it? they were people saying that the Bio will clog the original filter due to getting all the gunk out from the previous diesel.
i have never experienced any issues, nor did i have to change anything. Im not talking about home brew diesel here though in case that was not clear im talking about professionally manufactured biodiesel at a gas station. No changes are needed to run it. If you are distilling your own diesel from cooking oil (your nuts) but then yes you will probably want some additional filtration to get the old tater tots out before the injector. >:)
 

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But if I'm only filtering 3 gph instead of 5gph wouldnt my filters last longer and less wear on pump as it only doing a third of the work so it too might last longer?


the filters are not going to get clogged unless there is something to clog them, so if you add 30 gallons to the tank, once that is filtered, there's nothing else left to clog the filters until you add more fuel to the tank. This is why i say there's no benefit to going larger than a 95 GPH.

Also, its not 3 and 5 GPH, that is the number of times the entire capacity of the tank will flow through the filters, on a 95GPH pump, you will pump a 30 gallon tank through it 3 times, on a 165 GPH you will pump a 30 gallon tank through 5 times.

I did the math for this on a different thread and dont really want to redo it again because it involved looking up a lot of conversions but at 95 GPH you are pumping enough fuel to supply an engine with enough liquid energy to produce 5000 HP, the 165 GPH pump would theoretically (assumes no losses) create 8000 HP. even the 95 is way overkill for any light or medium duty truck, so i would not pay for any more then the 95. Having the 165 wont hurt you though so long as your wallet weights the same either way.
 

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I would venture to say that the filters may see more debris since it is circulating more but you also got to figure that since its already been filtered previously it shouldn't have that many contaminants in it to make a noticeable difference in filter life. As far as the life of the pump goes anything can happen but i saw a video where i believe it was air dog that had a pump at their shop that logged thousands of hours on it and it was still going running 24/7.
To add to that though, if there is sufficient contamination getting through the first pass to make an impact on subsequent passes, i would much rather replace filters more often then run that into the engine, but i still dont think that more than a 95 is needed unless your making absolutely insane power numbers. For anything you would drive on the street a 95 is plenty of flow and filtration.
 

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yes you will probably want some additional filtration to get the old tater tots out before the injector. >:)
You forgot to mention KFC’s chicken fat.
From my info it ain’t wise to make your own Diesel for the newer diesels.'uhNo
 

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Read sticker on pumps at the fill stations.Some say MAY contain 5,10 and more % bio.

Now if KFC had tatter totts.Oh boy!

I’m filtering my aux tank 10 micron into 2 micron with Water separator .
 

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If they even have bio available, Phx ain’t gots bio.
Aux tank has a 40 micron inline filter to my main tank.
The Baldwin LP filters for my AirDog 100, that I have on now, LP 10 micron, LP 20 micron WS, stock filter 4 micron with WIF sensor.

AirDog 100 & FASS 95 both are good for up to 600 hp.
The up-to 500 is a sales pitch to sell a larger LP which in some cases your stock pick-up can’t handle that much “sucking”.
You might have the 1/4-1/3 tank issues, plenty of chatting about this, where you’ll end up drilling a large hole in the bottom of your tank for a sump, or put a smaller LP motor on.

My choice was the 2nd one, I went from a FP100 too a 4G165, then to a 4G100, after I had these well known issues.
Besides these issues the fuel psi went from about 7-8 with the FP100 to 12-13 with the 4G165 (to high) back to 8-9 with the 4G100.
No psi adjustments on my LP.
 
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