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When we bought our 2011 2500HD it has an analog gauge on the dash, a place for an air compressor in the bed and airbags installed (but deflated). It looks like all of the Wiring is Zip tied underneath. So my question is, what air compressor does everyone use? Where can I buy it? Should I just use an air compressor I have at home? Thank you in advance for your help.

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That's kind of a sucky thing to do....pull the compressor and leave the rest. Previous owner must have had something more elaborate, like a aux air tank setup....and perhaps a larger/bigger air compressor for it (i.e. Viair).

I say larger/bigger/stronger, because the pump kits for the air springs are tiny things, similar to the cheapo cig lighter types that you wait 10 mins for it to pump a tire up to 25psi. :coffee:
If you want to be able to use 'em to pump up a tire, you'd need an on-board tank to supplement the pump.

Should I just use an air compressor I have at home?
What are your plans for the truck? Will you be towing? If so, how often?
Do you see your needing aux springs?


The deflated air springs you have mounted, may be toast by now. They need to have some air volume in 'em at all times, even unloaded, otherwise it can damage 'em.
Mfr's recommend a minimum of 5psi when empty.

But as to the pump question, it takes Very little air volume to change the psi in 'em. That's why the pump in the kits get by with being so small and under-powered. You don't really 'need' an on-board pump. A manual bicycle pump is all that's needed, to quickly inflate 'em for an added load. Hit the valves with an at-home air compressor set at @90-100psi, and 1 or 2 seconds can raise the pressure to 50-75psi.

I would 1st install a couple of schraeder valves on the hose ends, inflate to 75psi and let it sit for a while, then check the psi again and see if they're damaged or not, and holding pressure. You might also inspect the air hose routing. Many times on the install, you'll have some Tees in the lines for a secondary manual inflate, as a backup in case the on-board pump were to fail
 

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What Hook 'em said. I've been towing with the same Ride Rite air bags for over 10 years. I have each one connected (separately) to a Schraeder fill valve located in each rear wheel well. Don't tie the two sides together, keep them separate. When I tow, I fill to about 30 PSI, when not towing I keep 10 PSI in them. I built my own on-board compressor setup with a Viair 450C and a 3 gallon tank with an airchuck fitting under the rear bumper. I use a coil air hose when I need to fill them. Takes about 5 minutes to air them up this way. Every time you add an extra valve, gauge, fitting, line etc for air systems, you add another potential for a leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I won't be towing that often, just my fifth wheel maybe around 30 days year with a hitch weight around 1600-1800 pounds.
 

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In that case, you wouldn't need an on-board compressor. Unless you just wanted another toy.

If you haven't worked with aux air springs before, the psi measured changes as you apply more weight on the volume of air in them. Say you hook up to the 5er and air 'em up to let's say 50 psi. Now without deflating them, unhook your 5er and then measure the psi. It's no longer 50, more like 10 psi now.

So, once you establish what your psi needs to be with the trailer loaded and you see what it drops to when unhooked, you can now pre-inflate them at the house (from your stationary compressor) to the empty setting, knowing that when you do hook up to the 5er, it will increase to the needed higher psi.

Or grab a $15 bike pump and air 'em up after the hook up. ;)
 

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I use to use my bike pump,,now I have a ryobi cordless air pump.
 
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