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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
I recently purchased a Flashlogic Remote Start (FLRSBA) with the built in Passlock 2 bypass, its the remote start kit that uses your factory fob and three clicks of the lock button should start the truck. After messaging the seller so they could flash the module to my truck I got it. Wiring was pretty straight forward but when I went to go program it that's were things went south. I first took out my custom tune in the truck and returned it to stock. Then tried the programing steps outlined in the manual. When I wasn't getting the correct light patterns and flashes on the unit I called tech support and after a few diagnostics they tell me the module is dead or my truck wont tell it the right information. I also checked and rechecked all the connections to make sure they had a good connection. I am able to read codes and install tunes from my OBD2 port but for some reason it wont talk to the module. Anyone have any ideas on what it could be? Or any remote starters that don't require the OBD2 link? I have power at the obd2 port and I know there is a good soldered connection between the two.

Thank you for any/all help!
 

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Hello all,
I recently purchased a Flashlogic Remote Start (FLRSBA) with the built in Passlock 2 bypass, its the remote start kit that uses your factory fob and three clicks of the lock button should start the truck. After messaging the seller so they could flash the module to my truck I got it. Wiring was pretty straight forward but when I went to go program it that's were things went south. I first took out my custom tune in the truck and returned it to stock. Then tried the programing steps outlined in the manual. When I wasn't getting the correct light patterns and flashes on the unit I called tech support and after a few diagnostics they tell me the module is dead or my truck wont tell it the right information. I also checked and rechecked all the connections to make sure they had a good connection. I am able to read codes and install tunes from my OBD2 port but for some reason it wont talk to the module. Anyone have any ideas on what it could be? Or any remote starters that don't require the OBD2 link? I have power at the obd2 port and I know there is a good soldered connection between the two.

Thank you for any/all help!

i havent used that system, but ive used older flash logic hardware. The way remote starts work on the trucks before 2007.5 is quite simple and does not require the module to learn any key data from the truck, so i question the support you received, or maybe something was lost in in the conversation.

Looking at the install guide for that hardware, it appears to be no different then the old FLCAN as far as the way it is doing convenience features and passlock defeat. The J1850 wire (purple at the OBDII) is being monitored by the module for door locks, door triggers, and other convenience features.

Starting the truck is kind of a trick. it does not actually send any key data to the truck, because there is no actual chip in your key. what it is doing is telling the truck to go into diagnostic mode like if it were in for service. In this mode passlock is defeated and you can simply turn the key cylinder (assuming the lock were broken) and start the truck. You could also jump some wires together and start it too in that mode. It basically removes any theft prevention so that the truck can be tested without those systems potentially causing problems.

Only steps 1-4 of the programming procedure should be required, the remaining steps appear to be for programming tach, which you should have hooked up behind the cluster.

You can try closing the driver door then opening it before you program, sometimes waking the data bus up before you start programming fixes these issues.

You COULD do this install without any modules, just a remote start and a hand full of relays. You will need a minimum of 4 relays. 2 for the 5 wire door locks, and 2 for passlock defeat. You will also need a selection of resistors and or pots to get the correct RCode value, but this method is 100% reliable and does not rely on the data bus at all, down side though is you cannot do this with you system, because in order for it to know that the lock has been hit 3 times it needs to monitor that bus.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I will give the door trick a shot. Thank you for your info! It’s definitely got me stumped.


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Just an update. I tried closing then opening the door prior to the program. With no luck. I also rechecked my wiring and everything looks ok. I guess tomorrow I will send out the hopefully dead unit


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Just an update. I tried closing then opening the door prior to the program. With no luck. I also rechecked my wiring and everything looks ok. I guess tomorrow I will send out the hopefully dead unit


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my guess is they did not flash it for the correct vehicle. It is very uncommon to come across a DOA flashlogic module. It does happen, but it is super rare. Ive seen only 1 or 2 in the 10 years ive installed for. The same goes for most of the other bypass modules out there, they are quite simple circuitry and are usually quite robust. If there is a shop around you who sells compustar or idatalink components they may be able to flash if for you for free, or a minor charge and see if that fixes it. Some directed dealers (viper, Clifford, python, DEI, Avital, a few others) may be able to do it to, depends if they stock idatalink bypass modules or just DBALLs

Generally, if you weren't a tool about it id flash it for free, if you came in complaining about how shit the hardware is, and making it my problem like i sold it to you that way on purpose, you would pay. and if you ripped my door of the hinges to scream at me about it, you got to kick rocks most i ever charged was 20-30$ though, it takes about 2 minutes to flash. There are 3 kinds of people that walk into car install shops.... be the first guy, your experience will be much better.


can you type out what wires you have connected to what, and where you connected them? Its not that i think you did the install wrong, but experience has taught me that people tend to overlook things they assume are correct when they are not.
 

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my guess is they did not flash it for the correct vehicle. It is very uncommon to come across a DOA flashlogic module. It does happen, but it is super rare. Ive seen only 1 or 2 in the 10 years ive installed for. The same goes for most of the other bypass modules out there, they are quite simple circuitry and are usually quite robust. If there is a shop around you who sells compustar or idatalink components they may be able to flash if for you for free, or a minor charge and see if that fixes it. Some directed dealers (viper, Clifford, python, DEI, Avital, a few others) may be able to do it to, depends if they stock idatalink bypass modules or just DBALLs

Generally, if you weren't a tool about it id flash it for free, if you came in complaining about how shit the hardware is, and making it my problem like i sold it to you that way on purpose, you would pay. and if you ripped my door of the hinges to scream at me about it, you got to kick rocks most i ever charged was 20-30$ though, it takes about 2 minutes to flash. There are 3 kinds of people that walk into car install shops.... be the first guy, your experience will be much better.


can you type out what wires you have connected to what, and where you connected them? Its not that i think you did the install wrong, but experience has taught me that people tend to overlook things they assume are correct when they are not.


Thank you for your help and I am typing out the wires I have connected. I really hope I just overlooked something simple!



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Discussion Starter #7
So here we go.

From the M1 Harness to the Ignition Harness
Purple to Yellow
Pink with white to White
Pink to Pink
Orange to Orange
Red to Red
Red to Red
Black to ground

From the M2 Connector
White with black dot to Gray/black (on the BCM under the dash, B2 location)

From the M3 Connector
Brown with Silver Dot to Brake connector White wire
Purple/White Silver dot to White wire from the back of the instrument cluster

From the M4 Connector
Orange to Purple OBD2 wire
 

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So here we go.

From the M1 Harness to the Ignition Harness
Purple to Yellow
Pink with white to White
Pink to Pink
Orange to Orange
Red to Red
Red to Red
Black to ground

From the M2 Connector
White with black dot to Gray/black (on the BCM under the dash, B2 location)

From the M3 Connector
Brown with Silver Dot to Brake connector White wire
Purple/White Silver dot to White wire from the back of the instrument cluster

From the M4 Connector
Orange to Purple OBD2 wire

Yup, that all looks right. last thing to check would be to meter between the orange wire on the remote start and the purple wire, behind your splice on the vehicle (not connector) side for continuity. If that checks out, its either a bad module or it was not programmed correctly.
 

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Yup, that all looks right. last thing to check would be to meter between the orange wire on the remote start and the purple wire, behind your splice on the vehicle (not connector) side for continuity. If that checks out, its either a bad module or it was not programmed correctly.

Sounds like a plan. Any idea what the easiest way to probe the vehicle side of the purple wire without having to open the wire?
 

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Sounds like a plan. Any idea what the easiest way to probe the vehicle side of the purple wire without having to open the wire?
These are with out a doubt the most useful probes ever made. They are about 40-60$ for a pair from Fluke. Theres other brands out there including snap on and the like. ive tried several, including the snap on, and the flukes are by far the best. The picture below is of the Pomona versions, they are probably fine, ive had a lot of Pomona leads and they are great.



otherwise, get some wire strippers and just strip the insulation back just a bit to expose the wire, without cutting through the wire.

Basically like this, just use your meter lead where the second wire would splice in.

https://www.escape-city.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=31066

NOTE: auto strippers make this easier for the uninitiated but they are not required. a set of auto strippers will put you back 20-30$ for a descent set. again, the 4$ V notch strippers from lowes work just fine, they are all i ever used for that kind of wire splice.
 

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^^^^ That’s a terrible idea. Once you pierce the insulation you open it up to corrosion. Better off getting a spoon to back probe the plug. For instance with deutz plugs you can use this:


Or for a universal kit get these: https://www.opentip.com/search.php?cPath=32168&products_id=4231527&gclid=Cj0KCQjwl9zdBRDgARIsAL5Nyn1uRpuOS31LT6CX7smHiI6w6qr_MiBtmZaWnrRw6FbS9DHDe8H6c94aAt5OEALw_wcB
I have had customers like you before... obviously you would tape over the wire when you are done..... how do you think factory splices are made? There are many many splices in our trucks that do not happen at the connector. wires are just spliced to gether and taped or heat shrunk over. It would be very hard to back probe the wire in question since he needs to test the side of it that goes away from the OBDII.

Unless you are building a submarine out of your truck, the wires inside the cab are really not exposed to that much moisture, and the connector pins and the copper wire at the connector pin crimp are permanently exposed to the same air you are saying will corrode the wire.

also, the jacket on the wire is not actually impervious to water. If it were, you would never have wires corrode through under the insulation, which happens frequently in the door sills on a lot of vehicles. Pontiac speaker wires come to mind.

for the record, all of the information i have provided in this thread, and all other threads i comment on meets but usually exceeds all industry standards for aftermarket installation and repair. You are welcome to your opinion, it is just incorrect. Additionally, if you take your vehicle to any shop anywhere, they will use techniques as i have outlined if you are lucky. If you are not lucky, they will use T Taps and scotch locks, which actually DO damage wiring. So i would recommend you perform all of your own electrical upgrades and repairs to prevent "damage" to your truck.


PS, those Fluke leads unscrew all the way to give you back probe pins..... but what do i know.
 

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What do you know? Obviously not much about doing mobile electrical properly. I’ve spent years following so-called hack mechanic and stereo shop “electrician” types such as yourself that pull this shit having to fix and replace corroded wires and connectors. It seems to be the most common thing I’ve found a few years after a vehicle gets a car starter installed at a stereo shop or by a place like Best Buy. I’ve never in any of the many electrical courses I’ve taken been told open probing a wire through the insulation was an approved practice let alone even suggested. Sorry bud, but I’m not wrong.

Why would I use tape? If you use back probes you never open the insulation on the conductors so there is no need for tape. I’m aware the probes you mentioned also are back probes, but they WILL NOT fit into a Delphi, deutz, amphenol or similar connector. Hence the examples I listed.

BTW these splices you speak are sealed in heatshrink so they don’t corrode. How do you seal it after you poke a hole in the insulation without un-pinning the connector or cutting the wire?

Also there is plenty of moisture inside the vehicle to cause corrosion of exposed copper wiring. Especially in humid places or where they have a winter climate.

Take a proper electrical course. Maybe you will learn something about properly testing circuits.
 

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What do you know? Obviously not much about doing mobile electrical properly. I’ve spent years following so-called hack mechanic and stereo shop “electrician” types such as yourself that pull this shit having to fix and replace corroded wires and connectors. It seems to be the most common thing I’ve found a few years after a vehicle gets a car starter installed at a stereo shop or by a place like Best Buy. I’ve never in any of the many electrical courses I’ve taken been told open probing a wire through the insulation was an approved practice let alone even suggested. Sorry bud, but I’m not wrong.

Why would I use tape? If you use back probes you never open the insulation on the conductors so there is no need for tape. I’m aware the probes you mentioned also are back probes, but they WILL NOT fit into a Delphi, deutz, amphenol or similar connector. Hence the examples I listed.

BTW these splices you speak are sealed in heatshrink so they don’t corrode. How do you seal it after you poke a hole in the insulation without un-pinning the connector or cutting the wire?

Also there is plenty of moisture inside the vehicle to cause corrosion of exposed copper wiring. Especially in humid places or where they have a winter climate.

Take a proper electrical course. Maybe you will learn something about properly testing circuits.

see, and i feel the same way about what you are saying, so i guess we can agree to disagree. I feel no need to bring education, certifications or the like into this. Lets face it, neither one of us are going to scan diplomas or certifications and post them here (at least im not, if you want to, knock yourself out), so any discussion of educational superiority on either of our parts its just hearsay. I do not need to tout my accreditation to help people on this forum, If you feel the need to do so that is entirely up to you but it will not be reciprocated. I would not personally strip the wire just to test it, however i have the tools to do it without stripping the wire. There is no harm in stripping a millimeter of wire back to take a meter reading and then taping over the wire to protect the insulation and it may potentially save this guy buying a tool he may not have, and may not have any use for after the fact.

Im not sure if you have ever looked at it, but if you heat shrink 2 pieces of wire together, there is 2 roughly triangular shaped openings that are in no way sealed. So unless you are filling your splices with liquid tape or hot snot before you shrink it, they are also not water proof. There is also no vehicle plug i have come across that i could not back probe with those probes, not that that is actually important.

I am at a loss for how you think a wire splice should be made that would 100% waterproof the result when the factory wiring is itself not waterproof. There is copper wire exposed in the crimps of the pins that is sitting in the same apparently super damp air that you are saying will corrode a properly taped over wire splice. Hell, theres exposed copper on the battery lugs. If the problem was as bad as you say, where a tiny pin prick under some tape was going to cause catastrophic damage to the vehicle, why the hell does the manufacturer not seal the wire ends? They dont do it because its totally irrelevant in the grand scheme.

I will agree with you that i have seen a LOT of shaddy and shitty work done from many if not most shops. Every time i thought id seen the worst install ever done by mortal man, another one would roll in 10 times wore then the last. This is not that. There is nothing wrong with what i have said. Could you take the install to a level that is well above overkill? sure. but to what end? the body of the truck will rust away before that pin hole taped over causes the wire to fail.

I will give you stripping the wire to meter is is not ideal, but it is also not going to hurt anything either. There are WAY larger electrical issues on these trucks that will put them dead in the water long before a damaged J1850 wire to the OBDII... you can literally cut that wire in half and the truck will run fine with no codes, lights or errors. You are hyping this one in a million chance problem up just to disagree that is not reasonable. Thats fine, but your points are not justified because the wire is already exposed to the atmosphere at either end and at the factory splices. If exposure to moisture in the air was as significant of a problem as you are trying to make it, then every wire on the truck would be completely sealed 100% from end to end, and it just simply is not. All you are proposing is more work then what is necessary to safely and efficiently complete the troubleshooting.

I would also be willing to bet that the OP, while installing all of the 12 gauge ignition wires, probably had to strip some insulation off of the factory wires to interface with the ignition. I guess thats going to corrode and fail too... May as well buy a new truck right now and save yourself the headache...

Lastly, If your gods gift to installing, why dont i see your name all over this section? 2 of your 90 some odd posts over the last 4 years vaguely relate to electrical problems. I would think with that vast amount of knowledge you would be hanging out in this section with me trying to help people with electrical problems...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just an update for you. New module should be in tomorrow so I will give it a try. Also I ordered a Fluke multimeter and one of the test probes. I figured with all the wiring projects I have planned. It’s not a bad idea. I’ll keep you up to date.


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Just an update for you. New module should be in tomorrow so I will give it a try. Also I ordered a Fluke multimeter and one of the test probes. I figured with all the wiring projects I have planned. It’s not a bad idea. I’ll keep you up to date.


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Its hard to go wrong with a good Fluke meter and probes. They will serve you well for years and years. A note on the probes, they CAN be used as back probes, just make sure that when your done, you screw them back together. They are very very pointy and really hurt when you shove them into your fingers, and the metal is fairly soft so they dont break, but if you bend the tip, they also dont fit inside the probe body very well, and start to stick. With normal use, ive never had an issue with them, but ive seen others who are what one might call, "hard on tools" who have had less luck. The meter itself though is practically bullet proof. If you need to replace leads, Pomona leads are very nice, and a fair bit cheaper then Fluke.
 

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Update. Meter and the new module are in and good news. The new module worked just like in the pictures. It’s so nice to be able to start the truck from the comfort of my living room. The fluke meter is quite a nice piece and I put it to use checking the wires a little and it’s definitely a quality piece and is pretty user friendly.


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Update. Meter and the new module are in and good news. The new module worked just like in the pictures. It’s so nice to be able to start the truck from the comfort of my living room. The fluke meter is quite a nice piece and I put it to use checking the wires a little and it’s definitely a quality piece and is pretty user friendly.


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good deal, im glad its working for you.
 
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