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I'm posting in the LML section because that's what I have, they have a kit for the earlier trucks as well.

I wanted to share something I hadn’t seen done using a kit I found online by coincidence back in the spring, relocating the stock fuel filter for easier access. A few things first: I’m in no way associated with this company, I bought the kit and found it to be a good one and would like to pass this on to other folks who may be interested, I only found limited information on the net out there now. Keeping the stock FF in place even when running a lift pump is important if you running the stock CP4.2 fuel pump. The stock filter is hard to beat, it’s one of the best on the market and adds another level of security against contamination, esp. WATER. We all know the stock location of the fuel filter is not the easiest to access, on the earlier trucks it could be accessed from the top with a little effort, but not on the LML’s. I have the Madjack access door installed on my fender liner, as I got tired of stripping out screws taking out the liner and had to buy new ones from the dealer. That works OK, but it’s still a pain and screwing with the o-ring isn’t easy from below when you can’t see it laying on top of the passenger side tire putting the new filter on. So, via a google search, I found a relocation kit from a company called Western Diesel located in Arizona. All that I could find on the net about it was a Youtube video (which is nicely done btw) showing the kit being installed on a LMM. I contacted Western Diesel via phone to discuss, and have had nothing but good conversations/and experience with them each time I spoke with them, even after I ran into a bump during the install. I bought the LML kit and they promptly shipped. The instructions were good, but watching the Youtube vid was definitely helpful. You will need to remove your air intake elbow prior to starting. I have an S&B intake, I just removed the elbows and left the box with filter, it was not in the way at all as seen in the photos. I also worked completely from the top, no need to open up the fender liner. Tools needed: 15mm socket with extension, 1/2” closed end wrench (non-ratcheting – stubby works best), 1/2” socket, needle nose pliers for removing hose clamps (the long ones with a 45* bend-these are a must!), gloves (you’re going to get fuel on you).
Here is my install:
Here’s the relocation bracket, a nice heavy piece:
IMG_7784 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7786 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Here’s where it goes:
IMG_7783 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Bracket Installed, pull it as far forward as you can get it and tighten:
IMG_7788 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7787 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Next comes the fun part, the hardest part of the install (not really that hard), removing the filter from its stock location. Removing the air intake elbows and unplugging as many sensors to pull the wire harnesses out of the way will give you room to work.
IMG_7812 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7813 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
With everything unplugged and out of the way you’ll be going after the two fuel hoses attached to the hard lines beside of the alternator. TIP, take a pic with your phone before you remove anything to remember which hose is which and also mark them, you don’t want the fuel to flow through the filter backwards. I took the below photo before I unplugged the harness in the way shown in the photo, once its unplugged, there is room to work. With the hose clamps removed using the long 45* bend long needle nose pliers I still had to cut them down the middle with a razor to get them off. I stuffed as many rags as I could under the hard lines and hose before pulling them off, this kept fuel from getting on everything. I folded the hoses still attached to the filer to pinch them off and put a zip-tie around them to keep fuel from spilling out when I was ready to pull the filter out from the top. This worked really well, I barely got fuel on anything except my hands.
IMG_7815 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7819 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Next, it’s time to remove the filter and its head from the stock bracket. To do so, you must first unbolt the coolant line bracket that’s in the way:
IMG_7817 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Next, the hardest part of the install, removing the two ½” bolts holding the filter head to its bracket. There is not much room to work and a socket nor ratcheting box end wrench will fit. I used a stubby ½” boxed end wrench to get bolts out, you will have to pull the coolant line towards you (towards the filter head) to get to them. Don’t worry, the line is connected to hose on both ends so it moves. Be sure to unplug the WIF sensor from its connector on the truck before you take the last bolt out. With both bolts removed I rocked the filter back towards the firewall (remember we have the lines pinched off and zip tied), pushed the hard coolant line towards the engine and pulled the filter attached to its head straight out the top. Re-bolt the coolant line back to the bracket it was previously bolted to.
Filter with head removed:
IMG_7832 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Next it’s time to install the new hoses. I flushed my new hoses out a few days before with non-chlorinated brake cleaner and them hit them with compressed air, hung them to dry and taped the ends to prevent any contamination.
IMG_7807 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
I took this extra step on my own accord since the hoses are going to route behind the alternator to protect them. I already had this material on hand and have used it before in several types of applications, you can buy it online a few places, wear gloves if you mess with this stuff, the fiber glass in it is very fine and will stick in your hands for days (I know from past experiences):
IMG_7804 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7805 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7806 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7808 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Connect the back hose first and route it behind the alternator like so, leave it full length, then do the same thing with the front one – MARK YOUR HOSES (I took this pic after I already plugged the wire harness back in, again with it unplugged there is more room to work than the pic indicates):
IMG_7811 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7828 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7834 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7833 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
I then changed my fuel filter and removed the factory hoses still attached over an oil drain pan so I wouldn’t get fuel everywhere. With new filter installed and factory hoses removed, I attached the assembly to the new bracket pulling it as far forward as possible using the provided hardware and a ½” socket:
IMG_7835 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7836 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Mockup your hoses and cut the extra off, I cut mine a little long the first time on purpose to check the fit. After the hoses are connected I ran the new WIF harness beside the hoses and connected it back to its factory connector at the original location. I used heat resistance Zip ties to secure everything:
IMG_7842 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7843 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7839 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #2
WIF harness fit perfect with factory connections:
IMG_7810 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7809 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7838 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
Now, reinstall your air intake and wiring harness to all the sensors. Prime the crap out of everything like normal and fire it up.
Final pics of the install showing clearances. Disregard my pressure sensor in the bleed port on the filter head, I read lift pump pressure on my CTS2 at this location.
IMG_7841 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7843 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7844 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7845 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
IMG_7846 by Brandon Needham, on Flickr
So far I would recommend this kit. I’ll do an update about a year from now when I change my fuel filter. Hopefully that filter change will be much easier than the ones previously. I’m not saying changing the filter in its stock location is hard, but it’s a PITA that’s unnecessary for being a general and very important maintenance item for what it is.
Let me know any questions of comments!
 

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Great write up. Good pictures. What pressure are you running from lift pump? On my 12 I have done away with stock filter head as I could not get it to stop leaking, even after five rebuild. It kept leaking under primer button. I only run ten pounds of pressure.
 

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I am following this thread, great write up and pics. I am really interested in doing the same to my ‘11, but must first get things sorted out with a couple of issues related to deleting. One problem at a time please.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #5
6 PSI. Drops to 3 under WOT, no reason for me to run more than that, I'm only trying to provide a constant supply of fuel to pump. Haven't drained the rails as I'm not tuned. My old truck '12 (deleted and tuned) that I sold I ran 8 psi and never got below 4 psi under WOT. Running to high of pressure can kill your fuel pressure sensor and blow small fuel hoses off hard lines under the EGR. Haven't had a leak on either (knock on wood).
 

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Thanks. Mine is ten at idle, three at wot. Only leak was at the primer button.
 

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Nice write up!
 

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Interesting mod. Excellent write up, thanks for sharing.
 

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Great write up. Good pictures. What pressure are you running from lift pump? On my 12 I have done away with stock filter head as I could not get it to stop leaking, even after five rebuild. It kept leaking under primer button. I only run ten pounds of pressure.
This is hijacking the thread but I'm an outlaw anyway. When rebuilding the primer pump there are two square cross section o-ring like seals under the pump head. One has to face inward to hold fuel in and the other has to face outward to keep crap out. That is down and up as the filter head is mounted in the truck. If you have had repeated failures of the pump after rebuilds I would suggest checking the orientation of the two seals. Brake master cylinders have a similar setup and can have the same problem.
 

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Back to the OP's ideas. It would have been nice if GM had done something like this from the beginning. The current location is surely not convenient but I just don't know if it is worth the effort to move it considering how often it gets serviced. A step stool makes a lot of difference in how hard it is to remove the filter in the OEM location.

That being said, it seems that for the last decade of two the manufacturers have paid less and less attention to serviceability. It's almost like they don't want you to do anything yourself and they want you to pay even more to have a shop do it.
 

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Mitzerwizard, thanks for the info. I discovered that on the second rebuild. On the third try found torn o ring. Fourth and fifth could not find any reason for leak. That's when I figured filter head didn't like lift pump.
 

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I rebuilt one filtered with great success. The second, I gave up on after one attempt. I know they are know to crack also. I think a lot of the rebuild actually working has to do with the quality of the replacement seals and the condition of the seal lands. My 04 with the lift pump is the one that gave me issues with the rebuild, while my 06 bone stock worked flawless. The 06 got the Merchant rebuild kit and the 04 got an amazon kit. Now the 04 sports a new GM filter head from amazon with filter and WIF sensor for about $100 (IIRC).
 

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Ha yah good luck getting that awsum western diesel kit they have been removed from Amazon and they dont answer their phone, im gonna build my own👍🏽
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ha yah good luck getting that awsum western diesel kit they have been removed from Amazon and they dont answer their phone, im gonna build my own👍🏽
They’re backordered, check their site. Leave them a message, they will call you back, they always have me anyways.:thumb
 

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Mitzerwizard, thanks for the info. I discovered that on the second rebuild. On the third try found torn o ring. Fourth and fifth could not find any reason for leak. That's when I figured filter head didn't like lift pump.
The big problem with deleting the stock filter head is if/when the LP motor craps out you do not have the ability to prime the system.

For around $100 you can get a new GM filter head with a new filter as well. Problem solved.

Not to mention that the additional filtering and water separation certainly will not do the engine any harm.
 

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Mitzerwizard, thanks for the info. I discovered that on the second rebuild. On the third try found torn o ring. Fourth and fifth could not find any reason for leak. That's when I figured filter head didn't like lift pump.


With regards to whether the filter head likes the lift pump or not, you need to remember that everything has changed when you added the lift pump. Stock the filter head should be under vacumn since the CP4 is drawing fuel from the tank, through the filter head. When you added a lift pump now the filter head is under pressure, between 7-16 psi? Not a terrible amount, but it is under pressure.


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Agree with both of you. That's why I changed to aftermarket filter head. Still have two filter one has water separate.
 

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I really like this idea. Thanks for posting.
Is there room after the install for a Nicktane adapter and a Cat IR0750 filter?

shmoky
 

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Discussion Starter #20
No sir it will not.
 
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