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I am new to NE Utah and temps have gotten down to around 2*F at night over the last week or so. I didn’t realize I needed to use an additive to prevent gelling but I just bought some and added it to the tank. Truck starts and seems to run fine. Drove it around a few min to get the additive mixed in and then let it idle for about 10 minutes.
Do I need to do anything more? Should I be worried about gel in the filter or if there is any, will that “melt,” with the additive in it? It’s also supposed to get up to the low 40’s for then next couple of days.
Would the truck be running if the filter were gelled?
Does the gel break back down or does the filter need to be replaced to get rid of it?

Thanks in advance!
 

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The diesel you purchase most likely has additive in it. Lower 48 stations no longer use a #1/#2 diesel blend since #1 ULSD cost significantly more than using bulk additives. I asked a tanker driver 11 years ago when I saw him dumping diesel at the station I use and he said that he mixes in Power Service Artic when he fills the tanks with diesel at the terminal. It's done automatically by the terminal pumping system.
 

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I add anti gel when below 20 degrees. Putting your faith in a gas station to prevent gelling could land you on the side of the road.

Always have an extra filter on the truck and the tools to change it. I also carry a bottle of 911 degeller. If it's cold and you get change fuel filter message it's not gonna go away by simply adding anti gel. You can either change the filter and add some 911 or wait till the outside temp warms up.
 

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I am new to NE Utah and temps have gotten down to around 2*F at night over the last week or so. I didn’t realize I needed to use an additive to prevent gelling but I just bought some and added it to the tank. Truck starts and seems to run fine. Drove it around a few min to get the additive mixed in and then let it idle for about 10 minutes.
Do I need to do anything more? Should I be worried about gel in the filter or if there is any, will that “melt,” with the additive in it? It’s also supposed to get up to the low 40’s for then next couple of days.
Would the truck be running if the filter were gelled?
Does the gel break back down or does the filter need to be replaced to get rid of it?

Thanks in advance!
Be advised that typical anti-gel must be added to warm fuel as it prevents gelling as the fuel cools. It doesn't melt already gelled fuel, for that 911 in the red bottle is used. Warming the fuel up to the 40's will solve your problem. Remember when you fill up you must predict the future lowest operating temp and add anti-gel to the tank just before filling up to mix it in, and also you must double the amount of anti-gel if the predicted temp goes below zero. The heat generated by the main fuel pump is not enough to prevent gelling below zero. In my truck it takes about a 1/2 hour of run time to clog the filter to the point of engine stall as a result of gelled fuel. i carry an 100 watt electric fuel filter blanket with me to use in emergency's. workes like champ.

Cinno
 

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For those od you who trust in that PS911, theres a new video on youtube with a comparison between a few different brands and there anti gel properties at -20, might wanna take a look if you ever want to see what the different brands offer for protection.

 

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I am new to NE Utah and temps have gotten down to around 2*F at night over the last week or so. I didn’t realize I needed to use an additive to prevent gelling but I just bought some and added it to the tank. Truck starts and seems to run fine. Drove it around a few min to get the additive mixed in and then let it idle for about 10 minutes.
Do I need to do anything more? Should I be worried about gel in the filter or if there is any, will that “melt,” with the additive in it? It’s also supposed to get up to the low 40’s for then next couple of days.
Would the truck be running if the filter were gelled?
Does the gel break back down or does the filter need to be replaced to get rid of it?

Thanks in advance!
While winter diesel may have anti-gelling additives already in it, you should always use a fuel additive. In cold climates like yours, one with a an anti-gelling agent. Opti-Lube, AMSOIL, Stanadyne, FPPF, Diesel Kleen are all good additives. Like mentioned above, always keep a spare filter in the truck along with some emergency anti-gelling additives.

If I can be of assistance with any specific fuel additive questions, please let me know.
 

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Like mentioned above, my general rule of thumb is once the lows start dipping into the 20s at night i add antigel. You never know when the local weather channel is going to get the forcast wrong and you get a night down into the single digits. If you run straight No. 2 in the winter up here, most of them have addatives that are good for about -18 degrees. I typically run a No. 2/No. 1 blend with anitgel (OptiLube Winter Formula)in the dead of winter. This assures me that i will not have an issue.
 

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I add anti gel when below 20 degrees. Putting your faith in a gas station to prevent gelling could land you on the side of the road.

Always have an extra filter on the truck and the tools to change it. I also carry a bottle of 911 degeller. If it's cold and you get change fuel filter message it's not gonna go away by simply adding anti gel. You can either change the filter and add some 911 or wait till the outside temp warms up.
This was exactly my routine when I lived in WI and drove back and forth to MN a lot. What brought me to that point was my LLY gelling up 1 hour into a 5 hour trip in below freezing weather. Took about an hour with a new filter and a bottle of 911 to get back on the road. Took so long because I had to work in short stints to keep from freezing myself! :surprise: This came during an early winter artic blast a getting fuel at a mom and pop place that probably wasn't using winter diesel yet. After that, I kept a filter and 911 on hand but also used Power Service Treatment if I had ANY concern about the fuel I was using and often when I didn't in the winter. Not problems since. Then I moved back to Texas and rarely worry anymore! :wink2:
 
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