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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I have been in denial long enough. My 05 LLY with 155k needs headgaskets. I convinced my buddy to help me do it. shops around town were drooling over this wanting to charge $6000+ with bolts!

I would love a list of parts, specialized tools needed, other items/issues to address while she is torn apart, and other tips/advice.... anyone have a link to a good how to/ DIY write up? what about GM service manual for this job, or any specs I need? I want to be all set with everything needed before I tear it all apart. Perhaps this may also be useful to other who need to tackle this dreaded job.

I would like to do studs, best gasket, water pump is only a year old, t-stats? what else. going to get some vendor quotes on some of these things.

Thanks! :drink
 

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Do you or your buddy have a nice tool box? It's hard I tell what tools you need... Look what you need to take off to get access to heads, and note the tools you need. Torque wrench is one... Come on here what kid of question is this. Either you have tools or not. You need a tool to change head studs forget what that is called..
 

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There aren't many specialty tools you will need. Just a fuel line disconnect tool, fan removal tool, torque wrench as mentioned above, the usual sockets, wrenches, etc, and a good Allen set. I would also recommend a small 5mm Allen on a woblie head for getting to the rear lower valve cover bolts.

As far as materials look into getting a kit. There are multiple venders that sell head gasket kits. Just make sure to get OEM grade C head gaskets. They are usually what comes in the kits. You can do t stats if you want to. I bought a couple when I did mine but didn't replace them...just more or less got them as spares for later since they are very easy to get to.

The job itself isn't all that bad. Take photos during tear down and label everything. I also put small parts in labeled zip bags. It can actually be done without taking the fan out but is a pain so take it out or at least loosen it before taking the belt off... There are a couple of write ups out there. Google search LLY head gasket repair. I found a guys picture archive and referenced it during tear down and reassembly.
 

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Put a piece of cardboard between the radiator and fan-- so if you bump the radiator it will not damage it.

Take pictures of the fuel line hold downs, there is lots of them. put them in separate bags and label them.

If you are using studs, put the back two into the head [driver's side] before you install it. Make sure the back bottom is down all the way-- mine was up a little, and I had a massive oil leak.

Keep the hardware with what ever component you take off-- that helps going back together.

Before you remove the steering shaft bolt-- TIE THE STEERING WHEEL WITH THE SEAT BELT. Clock springs are expensive.

Keep everything clean and organized. I used a large table to lay things out-- that helps going back together.
Good Luck.
 

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Pull the motor :thumb Only special tools I can think of would be TRQ wrench, fuel disconnect, feeler gauges. 3lb hammer and wrench will pop the fan off no problem, no need to waiste money on fan tool imo. When you get the heads off put a strait edge across them and shine against the back of strait edge to check for warpage..
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We are not going to be able to pull the motor but I will pull off the front tires and sit the rotors on some timber and that should get it down another 8" or so.

Thanks for the link to the pictures. I have pulled the fan off last year to do the waterpump so it should come off easy enough this time.

What can I expect a shop to charge to resurface the heads... I have no idea!

Fuel line disconnect, feeler gauges, I'll check on those. Do you really need to remove steering shaft bolt?

If I were to replace anything else while I was in there, what would be the biggest bang for my buck given my upgrades noted in my signature?

In addition to the headgasket "kit" and studs I will also need fluids. change oil, oil filter, dexcool, a lot of PB Blaster for stubborn bolds/nuts, loctite for various parts, plastic baggies, marker, masking tape, beer, what else?
 

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Take your time and Don't rush it. A new DP if you don't have one. Merchant has a nice link for adjusting valves.
 

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Take your time and Don't rush it. A new DP if you don't have one. Merchant has a nice link for adjusting valves.
sorry a DP?.... brain is fried. ugh. thanks! :poke[1]:
 

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Discussion Starter #13

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I would pull the motor honestly..it isnt much more work to rip out the motor. That way you can get it on a stand and work on it a lot easier!


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Consolidated Notes Thus Far

Please add or comment. This can be useful to many others I hope.

Forum links with some useful information:

http://www.duramaxforum.com/forum/04-5-05-lly-duramax-powertrain/15910-head-gasket-replacement.html
http://www.duramaxforum.com/forum/04-5-05-lly-duramax-powertrain/119592-head-gasket-replacement.html
• GM Specs GM Specs - Duramax Diesels Forum need to have an account to view
• Photos: Duramax LLY headgasket job - JohnVH's Photos

Notes:
• 50/50 to remove or leave the steering wheel shaft. If remove, move seat forward and tie seatbelt around steering wheel to keep from moving. Moving wheel could break a $500 plus clock spring. My friend who helped do a LB7 head gasket job did not remove the steering wheel shaft, but it was a tight fit.
• Check injector balance rates on Edge CTS before and after
• Should I take to a shop and pressure test or test the truck to verify if the issue is head gaskets or just do it because it will need to be done sooner or later? With all my symptoms which have been around for nearly 2 years, I better get on it and just change them.
• New exhaust manifolds? Drivers side is restrictive, is it beneficial to replace? I see LML driver’s side manifolds on e-bay for $150 free shipping. Passenger side good?
• Valve lash specs are .012 many are going to .010 quiets things down… probably end up around .011
• Driver’s side rear bolts are tight fit. Put them in the cylinder head and tape them to hold in place then put head on and install.
• Removing the motor for my head gasket job is NOT an option
• What is this comment someone wrote about? “Check the coolant crossover on the driver’s side above the oil filter. It's a 90 degree aluminum piece that connects the oil cooler to the adapter plate. It's a common failure area, and only about two hrs to repair”
• AC needs to be recharged? My buddy didn’t disconnect the AC lines on the LB7 and will try the same again.
• ARP Head Studs are a MUST.
• Machining specs on heads? What is the surface finish? Do the heads need to be decked?




Here are some head gasket kits:
• Merchant Automotive in Michigan with exhaust manifold gaskets Merchant Automotive :: Duramax and Allison Experts
• ATP Trucks in Idaho for all with exhaust manifold gaskets www.atptrucks.com
• Diesel X in Nevada w/o exhaust manifold gaskets http://dieselx.com
• Creatures of the Night Performance in Delaware Creatures of the Night Performance


Part numbers
• Genuine GM Head Gasket Install Kit Part# 98403365
• Genuine GM Left Head Gasket Part# 12637785 (C-Series)
• Genuine GM Right Head Gasket Part# 12637788 (C-Series)

Parts/supplies needed:
• OEM Head Gasket kit with grade c head gaskets
• Exhaust manifold gaskets
• ARP studs
• Wheel well liner clips
• Brake Parts Cleaner
• Isopropyl Alcohol 70% (for cleaning)
• Dex-Cool. How many ltrs?
• Oil at 155k should I be running synthetic? Pros vs. cons
• Oil Filter
• Fuel Filter what brand? CAT conversion worth it?
• Fuel line disconnect tool
• Flywheel lock for easier fan removal Lisle 22100 Flywheel Locking Tool for 6.6L Duramax : Amazon.com : Automotive did w/o before, but harder… cheaper versions available?
• Turbo outlet? Brands? Prices from around $150-$250 and up. Benefits worth it?
• PB Blaster
• Shop towels, paper towels
• Masking tape
• Marker
• Plastic ziplock bags various sizes to store small parts
• Camera to document teardown for reference when reinstalling





• Beer


Special Cleaning Requirements
For 2001-2006 vehicles produced with the first generation head gasket, special attention must be given to the cleaning of the engine
block and cylinder head surfaces when servicing with a second generation gasket. The crimped areas (1) on the first generation
gasket may, over time allow corrosion buildup where they contact the block and cylinder head surfaces. The second generation
gasket has raised ribs that seal at these crimped areas (1). A special cleaning procedure is required to ensure proper sealing.
Cleaning Procedure
1. Remove the old head gasket using service manual procedures. Save the gasket for reference until the repair is completed.
2. Place clean rags in the cylinder bores and pushrod openings in order to keep out debris.
3. Use the J-28410 or equivalent to carefully clean the gasket sealing surface of large sealing or corrosion matter. When scraping,
take care not to scratch or gouge the metal surfaces. Do not push the debris into oil, coolant, and combustion openings or bolt
holes.
4. Inspect the gasket sealing surfaces for corrosion, especially in the areas that were in contact with the crimped tabs of the first
generation head gasket. If corrosion is present, continue with the rest of the steps in this procedure for proper cleaning. If the
sealing surface is sufficiently clean and smooth, use the revised torque specification listed towards the end of this bulletin and
continue with published service manual procedures to complete the repair.
5. For surfaces that have corrosion or pitting, wrap a piece of flat steel (4" X 2" or larger) with 600 grit wet grade sand paper. Using Moisture Displacing Lubricant, P/N 88862629 (in Canada, use 89020803) or equivalent, wet sand the block surface to remove any remaining gasket material or corrosion. Do not use any paper coarser than 600 grit.
Notice:
^Do not use any power type sanding devices.
^Do not use a wire brush or wheel to clean gasket surfaces.
^Do not use chemical cleaning agents on gasket surfaces.
Take care to keep the sanding block parallel to the block surface and evenly sand the sealing surface. Some areas of corrosion
will still show a stain. Do not attempt to wet sand these areas down to a shiny metal surface.
6. Change the sanding paper when it becomes clogged. Carefully and frequently wipe the surface, using a clean cloth each time,
to prevent sanding debris from building up and contaminating the oil and coolant cavities.
7. Clean the bolt threads and holes and remove the rags from the bore cavities and pushrod openings.
8. Repeat the above cleaning procedure on the cylinder head gasket surface.
9. Clean the engine block and cylinder head gasket surfaces with Brake Parts Cleaner, Isopropyl Alcohol 70% P/N 12378556 (in Canada, use 88901247) or equivalent, to remove any traces of oil or debris.
 

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There aren't many specialty tools you will need. Just a fuel line disconnect tool, fan removal tool, torque wrench as mentioned above, the usual sockets, wrenches, etc, and a good Allen set. I would also recommend a small 5mm Allen on a woblie head for getting to the rear lower valve cover bolts.

As far as materials look into getting a kit. There are multiple venders that sell head gasket kits. Just make sure to get OEM grade C head gaskets. They are usually what comes in the kits. You can do t stats if you want to. I bought a couple when I did mine but didn't replace them...just more or less got them as spares for later since they are very easy to get to.

The job itself isn't all that bad. Take photos during tear down and label everything. I also put small parts in labeled zip bags. It can actually be done without taking the fan out but is a pain so take it out or at least loosen it before taking the belt off... There are a couple of write ups out there. Google search LLY head gasket repair. I found a guys picture archive and referenced it during tear down and reassembly.
This about sums it up. Nothing too hard about it or special tools needed. But yeah, take lots of pics and baggy and label everything.

I took the radiator and IC out to make it easier to work on the thing too.
 
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