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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody, I was wondering if anybody had any information on hotshot trucking/hauling. I’ve been watching videos and seeing how people love it. If anybody has any information on where to start or how did you start? Or the cost of starting up and what is the best route to take would be a great help for me. Thanks in advance.
 

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You should cruise over to kowclub hot shot thread. I am sure that between him and Dually Guy (they both hang out in that thread) they should be able to point you in the right direction
 
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I researched this for awhile too, seeing my truck just sitting in the driveway and thinking “gee, I should be using this thing to make some money!” But I found it’s not that simple, especially if you already have another day job. Between all the increased costs of commercial licensing and certification, registration, insurance, fuel, wear & tear on the truck, food and lodging while traveling, etc. etc. there is a decreased amount of room for substantial and predictable profit. Not to mention the amount of time you may be away from home, although maybe that’s why some people get into it! ;)
 

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Paying for proper insurance for what is being hauled is a killer.

I hauled cars commercially for a bit, I still can't believe how many miles I had to run just to pay for the insurance. Pure insanity. To do any sort of hauling legally, it can't be done part time to make any money.........
 

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You might look at giving new RV delivery a shot. Rates are lower but the cost of starting up is minimal. Basically if you have a HD truck and a hitch or two, you're almost there, no need for a trailer. I think all the carriers will require that you carry some kind of insurance for bobtailing but it's a lot cheaper than the insurance for commercial hauling. My company required $1m unladen liability and it cost me about $125 a month. Their insurance covers the campers and any liability when you're loaded. Might be a good stepping stone to see if it's something you like before you dive in the deep end to full commercial hauling. Unlike other commercial hauling endeavors, you can actually pull campers part time. You can get one decent load a month, which most carriers will require, that will cover the cost of insurance and turn a few bucks. Anything after that you can figure on pocketing roughly 50% of your gross revenue.

And no matter what you do, plan on setting your truck up to sleep in and don't plan on eating 3 squares a day at truckstops if you want to make it worth your while from a profitability standpoint. That can easily eat up $100+ a day and the last thing you want to do after driving and being on duty for 15 hours is to be looking for a motel with truck parking. Then when you find one, many times you wish you hadn't found it. You end up feeling more like it found you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You might look at giving new RV delivery a shot. Rates are lower but the cost of starting up is minimal. Basically if you have a HD truck and a hitch or two, you're almost there, no need for a trailer. I think all the carriers will require that you carry some kind of insurance for bobtailing but it's a lot cheaper than the insurance for commercial hauling. My company required $1m unladen liability and it cost me about $125 a month. Their insurance covers the campers and any liability when you're loaded. Might be a good stepping stone to see if it's something you like before you dive in the deep end to full commercial hauling. Unlike other commercial hauling endeavors, you can actually pull campers part time. You can get one decent load a month, which most carriers will require, that will cover the cost of insurance and turn a few bucks. Anything after that you can figure on pocketing roughly 50% of your gross revenue.

And no matter what you do, plan on setting your truck up to sleep in and don't plan on eating 3 squares a day at truckstops if you want to make it worth your while from a profitability standpoint. That can easily eat up $100+ a day and the last thing you want to do after driving and being on duty for 15 hours is to be looking for a motel with truck parking. Then when you find one, many times you wish you hadn't found it. You end up feeling more like it found you!
That sounds like something I could do as of right now. How would I start doing that or find that to do? And do you know how much it pays?
 

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There are MANY haulers based out of the Elkhart-Goshen Indiana area. Some of the larger ones are Indiana Transport, Horizon and Wave Express. A few others that I'm familiar with are Synergy, Dynamic, Foremost, Hoosier, Star Fleet and Classic. You can get on their respective websites and check them out. I was pulling for Wave until I de-leased back in June. The last rate I knew of there was $1.80 a loaded mile. I've heard that rates went down since then but I think it's still over $1.70 a mile. That's for units over 13,000#. The under 13,000# rate was something like 15 cents less if I'm not mistaken. I'm not sure because I always targeted the top rates. Other companies have different rate structures.

Most companies' sites have a check list of everything you need in order to lease on. Most have a number you can call for recruiting where they will chat with you and answer any questions you have.

It's not for everyone but some guys make a career of it. It's flexible if nothing else. I've ran 15,000 miles in a month and I've taken a month off when I wanted. Bad thing about this year, it's been slow all year long but I hear it's finally starting to pick up. That's the absolute reverse of a normal year where we'd run hard from the first of the year through mid to late summer then things would get pretty slow for a while.

If you've got any more questions, holler out.

p.s. I just thought of another thing to be aware of. The carriers will require a damage deposit in case you damage an RV. My last deposit was $1500 which is fairly consistent from one carrier to another. You don't have to pay it up front. You can have them hold 10% of each load until you hit the required amount. Some companies may have a bit different plan but that's how Wave does it. They just mailed me a check when I de-leased.
 
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