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jokerfabworx.com
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tire technology may have improved to make a wider tire better, but I am still willing to bet if you put that same technology on a narrower tire the results would be better yet, up to a certain point anyway.
Pure, unfiltered, common sense. :thumb
 

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tire technology may have improved to make a wider tire better, but I am still willing to bet if you put that same technology on a narrower tire the results would be better yet, up to a certain point anyway.
I never said wrong, just old school and perhaps short sighted. The average truck is much heavier than 15-20 years ago, and the trucks have a lot more ponies as well. Sinking to the pavement is one thing, do you have enough rubber on the pavement in the first place? What do you do when you get off the pavement with the narrower tires?

Narrower tire=less rolling resistance and better fuel mileage. Correct? So why do OEMs not put the narrowest possible tire on new trucks?





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I never said wrong, just old school and perhaps short sighted. The average truck is much heavier than 15-20 years ago, and the trucks have a lot more ponies as well. Sinking to the pavement is one thing, do you have enough rubber on the pavement in the first place? What do you do when you get off the pavement with the narrower tires?

Narrower tire=less rolling resistance and better fuel mileage. Correct? So why do OEMs not put the narrowest possible tire on new trucks?





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That is why I said to a certian point narrower is better. Obviously you still need to watch tire ratings and make sure that, when loaded, you do not exceed them.
 

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Wide, stupid tires have never been good in snow. Where is the confusion coming from?

Very confused... :thinkkkk
This x4? Wide tires tend to ride on snow, narrow tend to cut through better. And I cant see how airing down will do any good, only make it worse IMO. And why is the "Im in Texas and my truck has some ice on it" guy giving advice on snow driving? LOL :poke[1]:

Here ya go JWC. Ice, snow, slush and salt all in one. The clean truck queens will cringe! lol



 

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jokerfabworx.com
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This x4? Wide tires tend to ride on snow, narrow tend to cut through better. And I cant see how airing down will do any good, only make it worse IMO. And why is the "Im in Texas and my truck has some ice on it" guy giving advice on snow driving? LOL :poke[1]:

Here ya go JWC. Ice, snow, slush and salt all in one. The clean truck queens will cringe! lol



You plow snow. What do you know? Wider the better. :poke[1]: :rofl

SOme of my 235/80R17 rubbers.


If it were SRW, I would still put 235/80R17s on it...

Anyone serious about winter, knows the basics. :thumb
 

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I agree with this. I used to have a set of Gumbo Monsters Mudders on my old Ford. They were the best tires I ever had for mud, sand, and snow. I also had a set of Toyo M/T's and they worked great.

The worst tires I ever had for snow was the BFG A/T's.


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RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
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Sound familiar? :rofl
 

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Most Known Unknown
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This x4? Wide tires tend to ride on snow, narrow tend to cut through better. And I cant see how airing down will do any good, only make it worse IMO. And why is the "Im in Texas and my truck has some ice on it" guy giving advice on snow driving? LOL :poke[1]:

Here ya go JWC. Ice, snow, slush and salt all in one. The clean truck queens will cringe! lol



:cookoo[1]:


Dats nazty!!

image.jpg
 

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I'm so confused.... maybe I'm missing something here but I live in Central PA.. from mid-October to mid-April we have nothing but snow, ice, slush, snow/ice/slush mix, etc.. on the roads 24/7.. And we have since I've been 16.. I've always owned lifted/big tired rigs with 4X4 and I've literally never had a problem. The MT's I've owned are: Firestone Destination MT, Toyo MT, Fuel Mud Gripper MT, Nitto Trail Grappler MT, Goodyear Wrangler MTR with Kevlar, Kelly Safari MT, and Cooper Discoverer STT's.. How are people having so many issues? Or is everyone expecting it to ride in the snow like it does on a warm day on a fresh paved road? I've gone up steep hills, through peoples yards with 12 inches of snow, on dirt roads, sharp turns, etc.. Never a problem. What am I missing?
 

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Seriously if you want see what wide tires will do in snow vs. stock narrow tires, lets take a ride down Cabbage hill on I-84 east of Pendleton, Oregon in a snow storm (aka near dead man pass). Guess what truck will have the most trouble maintaining control, there are truck ramps if you happen to make it there.

Having driven in snow in both the eastern US and now the western US, wide tires on snow and ice don't mix. If I ever lift my truck and put larger tires on, I will keep stock tires and wheels for winter driving. On my Saab car I have designated stud less tires for winter driving that are narrow for a reason.
 

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This x4? Wide tires tend to ride on snow, narrow tend to cut through better. And I cant see how airing down will do any good, only make it worse IMO. And why is the "Im in Texas and my truck has some ice on it" guy giving advice on snow driving? LOL :poke[1]:

Here ya go JWC. Ice, snow, slush and salt all in one. The clean truck queens will cringe! lol





HA, I missed it until you pointed it out :rof


I guess where I'm going with the whole tire thing, what was wide by "yesterdays" standards isn't really wide today when you consider the weight difference.

Like I said, my studded coopers in 285/75/16 are phenomenal and I wouldn't even think about swapping them out for a narrower size.
 

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jokerfabworx.com
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I'm so confused.... maybe I'm missing something here but I live in Central PA.. from mid-October to mid-April we have nothing but snow, ice, slush, snow/ice/slush mix, etc.. on the roads 24/7.. And we have since I've been 16.. I've always owned lifted/big tired rigs with 4X4 and I've literally never had a problem. The MT's I've owned are: Firestone Destination MT, Toyo MT, Fuel Mud Gripper MT, Nitto Trail Grappler MT, Goodyear Wrangler MTR with Kevlar, Kelly Safari MT, and Cooper Discoverer STT's.. How are people having so many issues? Or is everyone expecting it to ride in the snow like it does on a warm day on a fresh paved road? I've gone up steep hills, through peoples yards with 12 inches of snow, on dirt roads, sharp turns, etc.. Never a problem. What am I missing?
Can you give my hammer back? Because you NAILED it! :thumb

I'm glad I'm not the only one confused.




As for the tread width thing, I don't believe it is worth discussing. Either you understand it, or you don't. :p
 

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My 06 LTZ suburban did the same thing. It had the factory 20 in wheels. I don't remember the size but they were really wide. It would pull and jerk around in any ruts. Especially in snow on on the muddy gravel roads. If I made the first track it was fine.
 

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jokerfabworx.com
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Has ANYONE here ever driven a DRW truck on a snowy/icy road with ruts in it??? The ass-end shifts around like crazy for blatantly obvious reasons...........

Whether it be track width or tire width, if the tires don't fit in the ruts, they will try sorting themselves out.
 

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Reign in Blood
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its all the same ya say live with it but i dont get it dont you think maybe we can put it on credit...i get stupified
 

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I didn't read all the way through this thread, but I run the Nitto Terra Grapplers A/T in 305/50R20 and they suck on even light snow! I spin out on the thinnest of snow. It's annoying. Especially having to use it for work in North Dakota. Granted, it hasn't snowed much, but it still does get icy.
 

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Makes me think of the winter that I drove my 3/4 ton converted '79 Blazer.
40" tires + 454 = death trap.
It actually made me miss my Plymouth Horizon at times. The Hor' went straight at least.

I'm afraid there is no substitute for the proven skinny tires on snow and ice. It's basic physics. PSI and all that.
My Duramax is NOT the best 4x4 in snow that I have owned. Tricky driving with the turbo and gobs of torque that comes on fast.
Same truck with a 6.0 gas and skinny tires is an easier drive in the snow. I had two of them.
Keep the shiny side up.
 

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I'm so confused.... maybe I'm missing something here but I live in Central PA.. from mid-October to mid-April we have nothing but snow, ice, slush, snow/ice/slush mix, etc.. on the roads 24/7.. And we have since I've been 16.. I've always owned lifted/big tired rigs with 4X4 and I've literally never had a problem. The MT's I've owned are: Firestone Destination MT, Toyo MT, Fuel Mud Gripper MT, Nitto Trail Grappler MT, Goodyear Wrangler MTR with Kevlar, Kelly Safari MT, and Cooper Discoverer STT's.. How are people having so many issues? Or is everyone expecting it to ride in the snow like it does on a warm day on a fresh paved road? I've gone up steep hills, through peoples yards with 12 inches of snow, on dirt roads, sharp turns, etc.. Never a problem. What am I missing?
What were they like before 16?

I kidd, I kidd
 

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My opinion on this issue: The track is too wide. What does this mean? These vehicles are designed with a certain steering geometry which relies on certain design criteria that the engineers put into play when they created the front end of these trucks. They are camber, castor, and wheel/hub/tread contact patch geometry (sometimes known as the negative rolling radius or offset of the wheel itself).

Increasing the track on the front of a vehicle by changing the offset alters the vehicles sensitivity to changes in the profile of the road surface. For example, if you have a wider track on a vehicle (especially a 6" total increase over stock) and you ride on a road that has a rutted pair of tracks where all the traffic has worn the asphalt down so that there are two 1-2" deep ruts in the roadway, the vehicle you are driving will feel very twitchy, and easily jerk the steering wheel from side to side as each outer edge of tire tread is climbing up the slope on the outer edge of the rut in the road. This also happens when driving on roads that have aggressive camber. With stock geometry this doesn't happen because of the way vehicle designers calculate how such forces can make a vehicle unstable and ultimately dangerous. They design most wheels with a positive offset. Most vehicles nowadays have a positive wheel offset because due to the wheel geometry combined with castor and camber settings, all new vehicles will tend to simply track straighter even in the presence of severe changes in the roadway "level-ness"
In 2 - 3" deep snow you have a similar thing going on. The wheels would normally ride in the bottom of the ruts, but with a widened front track, they are clawing there way up the outer edges. Now if you were driving on skinny tires it would be less of an issue.

I strongly believe for the OP to have a safe steady predictable steering he would have to go back to stock wheel geometry until there is no snow on the ground. skinnier tires will help some too. I just think that 6" of increase over the stock track is too extreme.
 
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