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Should I go with a load range D or E tire? If i ever pull anything it's seldom. Is there a big mileage difference between the 2?
 

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Some tires have a two or three digit "load index" rating instead of a Ply Rating or Load Range. Numeric LT (Light Truck) sizes are generally load range C but some are rated D. Metric LT sizes are B or sometimes C. LT-F (Floatation) rated tires are generally run from load range D-F. You can usually tell the differences between the load ranges of two tires by their maximum pressure. Higher pressure means greater load. They usually run in 15psi blocks.

In general, a lighter tire will accelerate, brake and handle better and get better mileage. It's all about unsprung weight. However, some lighter duty tires have such soft sidewalls that their rolling resistance is greater than the benefit they produce from being so light.

Whatever you do, it would not be smart to fit tires that are rated less than your GAWR.
 

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if u can get a good deal on tires i would go e...10 ply stronger to if u go off roading
 

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Ok, just noticed on the website for my tire, they are rated D. I was thinking they were 8-ply. what is the normal weight for this rating?

I have put 12-13000 lb bobcat on the back with no issues. maybe I should have been more concerned.
 

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Ok, just noticed on the website for my tire, they are rated D. I was thinking they were 8-ply. what is the normal weight for this rating?

I have put 12-13000 lb bobcat on the back with no issues. maybe I should have been more concerned.
It varies from tire to tire. Some D rated tires can carry more weight than an E rated tire.

Towing 13,000# is not really the point. What is the load on the rear axle? Add up the truck weight, payload and tongue weight. Honestly, the easiest thing to do is look at your Rear GAWR and put a tire on that exceeds half (two tires per axle, right?) that number. If the weight carrying capacity of your rear axle is 6000#, then I would look for a tire that is at least 3500# rated. You certainly would not intentionally exceed the GAWR so having tires that are at least as capable is a decent safety margin.

The key is to inflate the tire to the max psi to get the rating. The weight carrying capacity falls considerable as pressure drops. This is why I recommended going 15-20% over on the weight rating with the tires.
 

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on top of waht everyone else has said. yes D are 8 ply and E are 10 ply. size for size E tires will always have a higher load rating and also be albe to run high PSI in the tire. also E tires are more stable towing because they have harder sidewalls and allow you to run higher PSI. E tires will ride rougher though forsure.
 

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i guess if you ain't pulling heavy loads much, you can do the D's. That is what i have and have no problem with pulling meduim sized loads.
 

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I think all Diesels came with E rated tires. If you are hauling a fifth wheel then you would want the E tire. If you had a D tire and going into a corner you could be in trouble towing because the trailer could push you if you were to hit the brakes. Due to the soft sidewall.( you could blow a tire).

Just my opinion.....Pat.
 

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I've ran both D and E and I prefer D....seems to ride better.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'll just go with a D. I know our trucks probably came with E ratings from factory, but I don't want the rougher ride if I don't need it.
 

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I'll just go with a D. I know our trucks probably came with E ratings from factory, but I don't want the rougher ride if I don't need it.
Just because a tire has a greater load rating does not always mean a rougher ride. All the load or ply rating means is that the tire can handle a higher AIR pressure. Consequently, it can carry more weight for that reason when inflated to those higher pressures.

In general, a load range E tire inflated to the same level as its load range D brother will have a ride (harshness) quality that is imperceptable to even the most highly tuned butt. If you want the softer ride, deflate your E rated tires down from their max.
 
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