Chevy and GMC Duramax Diesel Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
LHN...We ARE the Joneses
Joined
·
26,290 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a simple LP/aux Filtration assembly that I put together for an LBZ CC DRW….long & big hipped girl, but the mounting should work on the shorter HDs too.

With this setup, I’m adding two aux filters, leaving the tertiary OEM mount up front, but you can easily scale it down to 1-aux FWS filter (BF-1212) and use your OEM filter head as the new Secondary fine particulate filter (using either the acDelco TP3018, or the Racor PFF50216 or the Baldwin BF46062).

You’ll have an easy access water drain valve and the best in fine particulate filtering up front.

Parts Goodies Used:
1- Kennedy single pump Deluxe Kit

2 – Hastings KF-33 aux filter head bases,
(also repackaged under either the Wix 24770 or the Napa 4770)
plus
1 – Baldwin BF1212 fws filter &
1 – Baldwin BF7633 filter

2 - MV08FM ½” mini-ball valves

4 – Brass ½” hose barbs

5 – Feet bulk ½” bio compatible fuel hose
(I used Aeroquip # FC332-08)

1 – Roll ‘Yellow’ (fuel compatible) plumbers tape

The Deluxe Kit comes with all the extras you see here;



On the left are the underhood power/fuse tap harness (pink/blue wires) and the Relay.

On the right is the LP harness,
The quick-connect water resistant plug tap (in plastic bag) for the LP wires,
And the oil PSI switch (green cap)with a ½” to ¼” brass bushing .

Center, two plastic quick-connect barbed fittings and two heavy duty hose clamps.
Not pictured but included, two ‘clampless’ ½” hose barbs, ‘bout 4-5’ of ½” fuel line.

The mounting plate for the LP is a nice Stainless Steel saddle style that sits on the frame rail top and secures thru an existing whole in the frame with a single SS bolt/lock nut (3 holes to choose from) to secure. It comes milled with 2 mounting slots, ready for the twin pump kit, but also works well for a single pump and a single aux filter head.

I modified it and added a 3rd position for a 2nd filter, and two drilled holes for the 1st filter head.




The KF33 is a side mount filter head with 4 ports; 2-inlets / 2-outlets, for either a straight thru plumb or in/out on the same side. Included are 2 plugs for the unused ports.

I added the mini-ball valves to the mix to aid with filter changes (less mess, less priming).




Here we have the rough mockup, using the yellow plumbers tape on all hose barbs, mini-valves, and plugs. Note the two ‘clamp-less’ hose barbs on the pump (yellow ring) which were included with the LP.



Now the hard part…removing the short flex fuel line that runs from the top of the fuel tank (sending unit), forward and down to the hard line, just behind the fuel cooler, in front of the fuel tank.


Blue arrow = Supply,
Red arrow = return line



You’ll need the Lisle Part # 37000 release tool to slip in and release these 4 tabs of the quick-connects on the hose ends of this supply line.




The one behind the cooler is MUCH easier, as you have better leverage to apply pressure. You don’t have to remove the cooler, just pull the 3 bolts and move forward for access room behind it.

It’s the other end that’s evil, up on top of the tank. Using drive on Ramps for the front and 3x stacks of 2x8s for the rear, I had plenty of room under the truck to work with (stock height DRW).



Some will find it’s easier to fight with this devil spawn hose connection by removing the bed for topside access. A DRW bed with a B&W hitch and a Roll-N-Lock cover….that wasn’t a viable option for me, my location, and available help or hoist.

Once this line is removed, you’ll be using the two black plastic quick-connect fittings (see 1st pic above) for the ½” bulk fuel line plumbed in; one at the tank sending unit -> filter/pump, and the other from the filter/pump -> back to the hard line connection, behind the fuel cooler.

In front, looking back, new supply line thru tank bracket, beside return line quick-connect.




-continued-
 

·
LHN...We ARE the Joneses
Joined
·
26,290 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
-continued-

Here is the oil psi switch, installed in one of the two hex plugs at the oil filter mount. Included in the kit is a ½ x ¼ brass bushing adapter to be used here. Perhaps I messed up (correct plug) or my year LBZ differs from others, but both plugs on mine were 3/8, not ½. So I picked up a 3/8 x ¼ bushing to adapt the switch. It reads pressure and fires the pump, so I did something right.





Mounted (see bolt head thru frame rail, between filters) and plumbed in, awaiting harness run. A straight line to the primary filter head inlet, with a hose loop from the filter head outlet -> to the pump inlet. A little more than 2’ in length so as not to kink, and another hose loop on the other side – pump -> filter head inlet (foreground/right).



I used a short length of flex to wrap the red/black pump wires from the pump to the included snap wire tap plug (in plastic bag, 1st pic/1st post) for the pump harness connection. There was more than enough wire included on the pump and the supply harness to reach, as I cut the pump wires down to only a foot or so in length.



I used the kit included relay fuse tap (pink wire in 1st pic) @ the fuel heater 15a fuse to switch on/off.




The pump power (see blue wire on top left) connected @ Stud #2 terminal (engine side of panel, forward is stud #1, rear is stud #2), which you’ll have to remove the underhood fuse panel side cover for access.


Easy to do, look for the slots highlighted here low on engine side, for the tabs to release, then pull up. There is also a harness mount plug to push out (see pair of round holes at rear).


I mounted the relay (see 'ON' red light) to the firewall/corner area and secured the ground wire to the post there.



Harness to the pump, I followed the existing harness there on the frame rail, using zip ties to secure.


And, the finished install.


As an alternate to the above, with no needed bracket mods, less bulk hose and at a reduced cost, I recommend a single filter head mounted pre-pump for your primary FWS filter (Baldwin BF1212), using your OEM filter head under the hood as your new secondary fine particulate filter…just over $400 for everything.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,880 Posts
I'm glad to know your oil pan looks the same as mine haha. I always clean that crud off but it comes back.

Explain the hose loop at the filter/pump for me if you would
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,503 Posts


On that sharp edge under the fuel line.... I took some split loom, squirted some black silicone inside of it, and slipped it over the edge.

Disaster avoided.....
 

·
LHN...We ARE the Joneses
Joined
·
26,290 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I'm glad to know your oil pan looks the same as mine haha. I always clean that crud off but it comes back.

Explain the hose loop at the filter/pump for me if you would
That was residue from a HB leak and a PS hose that blew. Downerrr You can see more of it on the frame in the oil psi switch shots. Took FOREVER to get it eventually clean. nono Had my fill of leaking PS fluid....everywhere.

The loop, both hose barbs are together side x side...so a loop of hose to connect, so as not to kink with too tight a bend.


One that sharp edge under the fuel line.... I took some split loom, squirted some black silicone inside of it, and slipped it over the edge.

Disaster avoided.....
Yeah, I messed with that during install. Wound up using the return line as a stand-off from the shield's edge, but the pic has the illusion of it being right on it still. Could be something to check on though....it's been a while since the install, just very late on the thread post.
 

·
LHN...We ARE the Joneses
Joined
·
26,290 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
alignment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Subbed. Thanks for doing this DIY.

'07 GMC LBZ CCSB
 

·
LHN...We ARE the Joneses
Joined
·
26,290 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Update....Fuel Filters lifespan

...I'm just wondering if anyone knew what kind of vacuum increase the CP4 would have on it if the Kennedy pump took a dive, and it was pulling through all three (filters). Thanks!
The JK pump is a magnetically coupled centrifugal pump.
No power = no coupling = no flow restriction.

With my install, I ran for several hundred miles before feeding power to the pump. 3 fresh filters (BF1212, BF7633, and a Racor up front) and no pump power measured 2"hg, same as just the fresh Racor alone.

That is my baseline to measure used filter(s) restrictions and know when it's time to change. The CP3 had no issues pulling thru the 3 fresh filters, while hauling heavy. CP4, probably the same. All 3 filters are rated high for no pressure drop.

As to whether you should go with 2 or 3 (better filtration?);
After the install, I followed the DIC % (roughly) and changed the primary and secondary filters, leaving the tertiary Racor alone.

On that second set, I reset the DIC when it reached 0, and continued running, as I wanted to get a feel for how much further life they may or may not have had. Not worried about lacking filtration, as I had the Racor up front for backup.

Around 60-ish % DIC, I started having some flow issues under load and went ahead and swapped them out. And, I also changed the Racor at the same time, as it had run 2.4x DIC cycles.

I then cut open the Racor to judge it's use and determine how much life was left. Y'all judge....these are the innards after approx 3k gallons of fuel, downstream from the Baldwins listed above.





Looks like I wasted a perfectly good Racor, but confirmed little or no use when downstream of 2 quality primary and secondary filters, doing what they're designed to do. humpin:

This was the BF1212 FWS filter cut open at 1.4x DIC, showing the media void you get when under suction.



Running just the stock Racor under vacuum, you'd also see an unused void after use. However, with your pump kit, a FWS filter and positive pressure after the pump, you'll see far greater lifespan from the Racor as a secondary filter as you'll be better utilizing the available media, plus the FWS effect with grabbing the big particulates first.

Running 3 vs 2 can save you money. I just picked up a new set of the two Baldwins, with tax, $26 out the door. Which is about $10 cheaper than the Racor alone. So, taking the cost of the 3rd filter head/hose/hardware ($50?) added, that's 5 filter cycles to break even.

All of the above is why I say, you can get quality filtration/protection with 2, but 3 makes it easier to service (no underhood work) and will eventually save you money....although, it will be some time and a lot of miles (50k-70k).

:laugh:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,728 Posts
Could you elaborate on the plumbing of her filter heads? I see an in and an out on both filter heads. Just trying to clear this up.
 

·
LHN...We ARE the Joneses
Joined
·
26,290 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The filter heads have two pairs of ports on each side; 2-in, 2-out...and comes with two plugs for the two unused ports. Versatile for different configs needed.

(plugs installed, pic #4 -post #1)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,728 Posts
What is your use of both the supply inlets? Isn't there supposed to be one in-one out??
 

·
LHN...We ARE the Joneses
Joined
·
26,290 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Notice the two long humps in the top.
The hump in the foreground is the inlet (with two input port options on each end), the other hump in the background is the outlet (with two output port options on each end).

I'm running the flow in a U shape in/out, while the option is there to run the flow straight thru, if that fits your plumbing design. Just plug the two ports not used.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,728 Posts
Notice the two long humps in the top.
The hump in the foreground is the inlet (with two input port options on each end), the other hump in the background is the outlet (with two output port options on each end).

I'm running the flow in a U shape in/out, while the option is there to run the flow straight thru, if that fits your plumbing design. Just plug the two ports not used.

I see. It would seem that would offer a nice flow.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
669 Posts
Nice work!

The things we do to keep those Duramax running.
 

·
LHN...We ARE the Joneses
Joined
·
26,290 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Answering questions asked, before your edit;
The stock filter pushes the ball up out of the way, when you install the filter. Their (ball/spring) purpose is to not let fuel drain out when you remove the filter for a new one. The adapter's design does not push the ball up and out of the way and fuel is restricted, that's why you remove them when you install an adapter.

None of this^ would affect an idle surge issue.

The filter specs you referenced are incorrect.
With current ISO test standards, 4µm absolute is the new benchmark, which is where the cat filter is at.
This is what Bosch wants to see with their fuel system, 4µm.
Particle size didn't change, just the manner in which it's tested.

From what I've seen, the 3µm claim on the Donaldson is based on old standards. They haven't updated their data. The cat, is the same µm as the Racor or the Baldwin designed for the stock location, although it's efficiency rating is 1.x% less than the other two (98% vs 99.3/99.7).
The new acDelco TP3018 (no longer a Racor filter -TP3012) hasn't been tested and there are no published specs available that I've seen.

At one time (pre '08), the adapter was a viable solution to better filtration vs the stock filter (although, no water protection). That's changed. Filter mfrs have stepped up with improvements (circa 2008/2010) for the stock filter location, and they now exceed what the adapter/filter can do for you.

If better/more filtration is your goal, adding an aux FWS filter to the mix is a better solution than an adapter. And since you're into the supply plumbing for that, you might as well add a LP too, for positive pressure going forward.

The FWS will deal with the larger particles (10µm), and combined with the new positive pressure, you'll see a better (longer life) use of the full media in your secondary filter than before, without an aux filter and negative pressure.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top