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Discussion Starter #1
Well Wednesday I have a big fencing job to start. It will be approximately 300 ln. ft. of privacy fence. This is what I am working with. 40 bags of 80# concrete, 565 6' pickets, 37 post, 111 8' rails. So i need all the room on my trailer for lumber.
This is my question; would it be okay to put all the concrete in my bed, and all the lumber on my trailer. Everything will be evenly distributed on the trailers axels and tounge. So I will have 3200# in the bed, and approximate 2500-3000# on trailer.

What do y'all think? Im sure the truck will move it fine, but a little worried about the weight in the bed? :gearjamin
 

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My vote is no, you're putting a car in the bed of your truck along with the weight of the trailer+load sitting on the hitch. I think that is too much for a 3/4 ton but then again I'm pretty conservative.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Damn, lol, i didn't want to hear that. That would mean another 80mi rnd trip to the supply house for the concrete.
 

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hold on hold on let somebody who knows more than me chime in they might have a different angle on the matter
 

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My vote is no also. You will probably break a leaf spring or two. Remember, these trucks are rated for 3/4 ton or 1500lbs. I put 2340lbs, on mine regularly, (the pin weight on my 5th wheel), but I am also running a set of air bags inflated to 40psi. And Bilstein 5100's.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hmm maybe i can get away with spliting half the concrete on the truck and the other half on the ass end of the trailer to balance out the tounge weight.
 

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Hmm maybe i can get away with spliting half the concrete on the truck and the other half on the ass end of the trailer to balance out the tounge weight.
Sounds like a good plan!!
 

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I was getting rock at the Quarry the other day and saw a guy put 2 tons in the bed of a 1st gen cummins 2500. Do it.
 

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I put 4700# pallets of chemical in the bed of my work truck and pull a trailer with about 8000# on the hitch all the time. can be a little squirly on a gravle road but hasn't hurt the PU any, just rides smoother :)
 

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I was getting rock at the Quarry the other day and saw a guy put 2 tons in the bed of a 1st gen cummins 2500. Do it.
It always frightens me to assume something a cummins guy is doing is correct :rof

I'd probably split the concrete a bit and load the bed with quite a few of the pickets along with the concrete. Just take it slow.
 

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I was getting rock at the Quarry the other day and saw a guy put 2 tons in the bed of a 1st gen cummins 2500. Do it.
I put 4700# pallets of chemical in the bed of my work truck and pull a trailer with about 8000# on the hitch all the time. can be a little squirly on a gravle road but hasn't hurt the PU any, just rides smoother :)
full steam ahead!:gearjamin
 

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I have put 3000lbs in the bed and put 4 tons in my dump trailer before. The truck pulled it fine, but the suspension was maxed out IMO. I was only going a few miles so I wasn't that worried about it, but to go 80 miles that way, forget it!

I would lay all the concrete on the trailer flat (1 level high or as far as the square footage will allow) then lay a sheet of plywood over it and then put the rest of your material on top of that. It will be a much nicer ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I could do that put I need to concrete and post first, before i need the rails and pickets.
 

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And when you unload the trailer, the last thing off will be the 1st thing you use...no problemo. :D
 

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Kalin,

Wheres your job? If your going north, just call pro-build and have them drop it all off for ya. Prob solved.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
And when you unload the trailer, the last thing off will be the 1st thing you use...no problemo. :D
That makes sense, typically we do that. But who knows, some people don't want materials left on site:cookoo[1]:
Kalin,

Wheres your job? If your going north, just call pro-build and have them drop it all off for ya. Prob solved.
Job is out east of Widefield Security area. Problem with that is we only use Rocky Mountain Forrest Products exclusively. And besides why have a deisel and not work it :cool: :gearjamin
 

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Well, if your looking at two trips, you might as well have them make one for ya. I'll be doing a deck soon, looks like they have some good product, I'll have to go see them.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yea they have some really nice lumber, but nothing for framing. Mostly all your composite decking and hardware, and rough sawn cedar. Where at in Colorado are you?
 

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That makes sense, typically we do that. But who knows, some people don't want materials left on site:cookoo[1]:
My Bad….most fencing crews never haul material back and forth daily, just the materials needed to complete that day’s work. Come to think of it, I don’t recall any contractor doing double duty with hauling jobsite materials to and from….but that’s just me.

Do you have to pick/pull the complete job pack all at one time? If so, 40 bags is not much volume to add fore and aft, if the trailer’s up to the total weight. You should be able to work thru the pile as the job progresses, with minimal material movement, No?

3200 lbs of GN pin weight centered just in front of the axle handles totally different than 3200 lbs of cement spread out over the whole truck’s bed…it’s not pleasant, even less so with a tag trailer behind along with it’s added tongue weight.
 
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