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Discussion Starter #1
Ok this might not be the best chat room for this question but I figure many of you that maintain your trucks might have similar problems....

I got a bunch of little out spots on my driveway that’s come after I change my oil. How can I get them off? The HOA o live in is up my butt about them. I’ve tried pressure washing and even put gasoline on them trying to eat a layer of cement. No luck. Any other thoughts???

yeah I know if I clean up after myself when I change the oil better this would not be a problem but sometimes I am just lazy I guess and don’t wipe everything clean.
 

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A degreaser like simple green or krud kutter. I like simple green, smells good safe for the environment. HOA can't complain.
 

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Simple green doesn’t work on stain that have been there for months. I’ve tried that too but thanks for the thought
 

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A hot water pressure steam washer might be your best bet.
 
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Get the granule (like cat litter) absorbant. If it dry outside leave it there for a week. It will be cleaner than the rest of the driveway. Even step on the absorbent after you put it down, grind it in.
 
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Get the granule (like cat litter) absorbant. If it dry outside leave it there for a week. It will be cleaner than the rest of the driveway. Even step on the absorbent after you put it down, grind it in.
i might be trying this when mine dries out. I have several oil stains from my car.
 

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i might be trying this when mine dries out. I have several oil stains from my car.
It works great, Unfortunately it doesnt happen quick and in the era of the microwave and fast food. You get the point everybody wants everything now. It does work. I go to the auto parts buy a small bag, put some down. When the spots gone dust pan it back in the bag. Its reusable. Dust and all
 

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Cat litter and grind in by foot to get down to the oil. Also muriatic acid and finish scrubbing with power purple. Then hose off or power wash
 

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Thanks for the tips. I’ve heard the cat litter thing before but with the rainy season I probably won’t be able to try it for a while
 

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2005 GMC Sierra 2500HD SLT 4X4 CCSB / 6.6 Duramax / Allison 1000 / S&B Mouthpiece / 4" MBRP
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Ha. This is right up my alley. I own and operate a pressure washing and exterior cleaning company. I get these calls all the time.

When you notice an oil stain IMMEDIATELY put oil dry on it. I mean right then. Wear boots and crush it and grind it in. Then leave it for a week. Sweep it up and examine the results. If it's good enough for your liking (or HOA) then good to go.

If caught soon enough, that usually does the job. If the stain is old or has fully absorbed into the concrete then your job gets much more difficult. Typically we would surface clean the area with hot water (180 degrees is usually enough) and no more than 2300-2500 psi (depending on age of concrete), spray on some degreaser probably mixed 50/50 with just a splash of surfactant to help break the surface tension and allow the degreaser to penetrate deeper. Then agitate with a stiff deck brush and let dwell for 20-30 minutes while agitating regularly and misting with degreaser to not allow the degreaser to dry. Then surface clean again. Rinse the entire area thoroughly. Allow to dry and then check the results. If still not good enough there are other chemical options to try to remove the stain or there are options to help blend the stain in to the surrounding concrete.

Also, when cleaning oil stains you cannot allow your water runoff to enter into municipal storm drains so you'll need a way to redirect the runoff to landscaping or you'll need to capture all of the runoff with a reclaim system. Having the HOA hound you is bad. Having the EPA on your back is 10000x worse.


Best thing for you to do would be call a professional. 95% of us give free quotes.
 

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Just noticed you're in California. Definitely going to need to reclaim all of the runoff.
 

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Also, the difference between the chemicals we use and the stuff the rest of the population buys is dramatic. When I say degreaser I'm not talking about purple power, simple green or any of the store bought stuff. That stuff has its place and we usually keep it around the shop for cleaning up our own equipment and things like that but for what you need done it is not going to cut it.
 

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Ha. This is right up my alley. I own and operate a pressure washing and exterior cleaning company. I get these calls all the time.

When you notice an oil stain IMMEDIATELY put oil dry on it. I mean right then. Wear boots and crush it and grind it in. Then leave it for a week. Sweep it up and examine the results. If it's good enough for your liking (or HOA) then good to go.

If caught soon enough, that usually does the job. If the stain is old or has fully absorbed into the concrete then your job gets much more difficult. Typically we would surface clean the area with hot water (180 degrees is usually enough) and no more than 2300-2500 psi (depending on age of concrete), spray on some degreaser probably mixed 50/50 with just a splash of surfactant to help break the surface tension and allow the degreaser to penetrate deeper. Then agitate with a stiff deck brush and let dwell for 20-30 minutes while agitating regularly and misting with degreaser to not allow the degreaser to dry. Then surface clean again. Rinse the entire area thoroughly. Allow to dry and then check the results. If still not good enough there are other chemical options to try to remove the stain or there are options to help blend the stain in to the surrounding concrete.

Also, when cleaning oil stains you cannot allow your water runoff to enter into municipal storm drains so you'll need a way to redirect the runoff to landscaping or you'll need to capture all of the runoff with a reclaim system. Having the HOA hound you is bad. Having the EPA on your back is 10000x worse.


Best thing for you to do would be call a professional. 95% of us give free quotes.
so my stains are around a year old. Some came off with just normal power washing. Some came off with normal weather.

the oil pan is getting replaced as soon as the weather breaks for good though.

I’m going to attempt the kitty litter but I think I might need more.
 

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so my stains are around a year old. Some came off with just normal power washing. Some came off with normal weather.

the oil pan is getting replaced as soon as the weather breaks for good though.

I’m going to attempt the kitty litter but I think I might need more.
You have to be careful when power washing concrete. Most basic homeowner machines produce enough pressure to actually remove the cream coat from the concrete. Once that cream coat is gone the material underneath will begin to weather away at a much faster rate. Oil doesn't just "come off" the concrete. It penetrates deeper and deeper as it sits. Eventually it has permeated the entire area and may never come out. Some have had luck with torching out small stains but that can also weaken the concrete and I've never seen someone do that and it look like the untouched areas adjacent to it. Good luck with it!
 

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You have to be careful when power washing concrete. Most basic homeowner machines produce enough pressure to actually remove the cream coat from the concrete. Once that cream coat is gone the material underneath will begin to weather away at a much faster rate. Oil doesn't just "come off" the concrete. It penetrates deeper and deeper as it sits. Eventually it has permeated the entire area and may never come out. Some have had luck with torching out small stains but that can also weaken the concrete and I've never seen someone do that and it look like the untouched areas adjacent to it. Good luck with it!
thanks.

im going to start with the kitty litter and then look at hiring someone.
 

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I'm very old (damn!) and I found the miracle oil stain remover just a few months ago. "Goof Off Concrete Cleaner and Oil Stain Remover" which I got from Home Depot. Just pour over a spot to completely cover. Wait a day. Instructions say sweep but I use a garden hose with a nozzle. No scrubbing, no work. We redid our driveway a few years ago with concrete pavers and my wife was getting really mad at me; oil just spontaneously splashes I think (couldn't be me!).
 
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