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Just picked up a 3200 and 55-300 lens for my upcoming vacation. Definitely going to start using it for the truck.

Unfortunately the lenses are quite pricey as well for someone on a budget.
 

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I've been playing with my wife's camera a lot lately. Its not a SLR, but one of the higher end cannon ones just short of SLR. It has most of the bells and whistles to take pretty good pics. I just have a hard time getting the right balance of the settings. It really needs a tripod since I can't hold it steady enough with slower shutter speeds. But it takes really good pics when I can set it down and use the timer. It doesn't have enough adjustability in the aperture tho.

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Im planning on getting that new nokia windows phone with a 41 mega pixel camera
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I just wanted to add a small update to this.

Guess I am going to have to get a good camera to compete with this crowd!!!!
Helpful, yes. Needed, no

While a high end camera helps take high quality pictures. one still needs to have a basic knowledge of composition and what makes a good picture. You can have the best camera in the world, but if you take a picture in your drive way with half the truck cut off its still gonna look like shit. :)


For instance.. Lets compare..

First pic is of a professional photog who is using high end gear, took time to set up the shot, and of course post processing (photoshop). second is just a truck in a driveway.. which one would you vote for?

Granted i dont expect everybody to have the skill and equipment that the pros have, but at least take some time to think about the shot before you take the picture.


 

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Discussion Starter #27
Added a new update that i read in Super Street magazine last night to the first post. Its a pretty good one for everybody to read
 

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Taking the Long Way Home
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Nice to see you following up on tips and tricks Jason, I forgot how much has changed in photography.
The over all concept remained the same for getting the shot, but the tech has really come far..
Maybe I need to take a cruise out for a opportunity shoot :D


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Discussion Starter #30
THanks guys.

here is another example. one thing for people to keep in mind that amazing shots dont necessarily just come right off the camera. they sometimes and usually get worked over in photoshop to make the image pop. (which is also why i fought the "No photoshop" rule.)

 

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Photoshop is nice for things as you have exampled there above, what makes a good shot is the person behind the lens, I would agree on the No PS rule myself, When I was in Club back in the days, YES way back LOL, we didnt have PS or digital, All Old school. You needed to be able to read a meter and understand F stops and shutter speed correlation then :D
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Very true. It still takes skill to visualize the shot, set it up, shoot it. the editing just put the quality up another notch.



One of the guys we have here who is retiring and moving to Belize gave my department a bunch of old photo books. While the shots were good. by todays standards they are total crap.
 

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This thread really helps people like myself, who don't know squat about photography.

I bought a used Nikon d5100 off craigslist, it came with two lens (55-200mm and 18-55mm). Still in really good shape. I don't know how to use it really.

Do you use any UV filters?
 

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Discussion Starter #34
UV filters are mainly just used as lens protectors now a days. UV light does not effect DSLRs like it did the old school film cameras.

Sometimes ill use polarizing filters tho. My advice would be to not use auto mode on your camera and use the Aperture Priority Mode (A or AV), or Shutter Priority Mode (S or TV). There is different uses for each of these settings.

The first one A, or AV is where you control the Fstop which then allows you to control depth of field. (this is what i use for most still vehicle shots) Lower the number, the more background blur you will get.

the second setting, S, or TV is where you control the shutter speed. which is useful for say sports or action shots. sometimes you want to capture a car moving and have the backround blured to give the feeling of motion, for this you will want to use a slower shutter speed. or say if you want to freeze action you will want to use a faster shutter speed.

Keep in mind that there is a ton of different variables and times blah blah blah to use these settings. you more or less need to go out and practice using each setting and learn what makes what work out the best.
 

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Already learning a lot, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #36
No prob. the ultimate goal is to shoot in full manual mode so you have complete control over your shot. For lots of shots i will use full manual. but the AV or TV (canon), or A or S (nikon) are excellent for quick shooting with good results.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I wanted to add some more information to this thread about the Rule of Thirds in photography to help you guys compose your images better in an effort to make them more compelling.

All info taken from here
Rule of Thirds - Digital Photography School


Perhaps the most well known principle of photographic composition is the ‘Rule of Thirds‘.

The “Rule of Thirds” one of the first things that budding digital photographers learn about in classes on photography and rightly so as it is the basis for well balanced and interesting shots.

I will say right up front however that rules are meant to be broken and ignoring this one doesn’t mean your images are necessarily unbalanced or uninteresting. However a wise person once told me that if you intend to break a rule you should always learn it first to make sure your breaking of it is all the more effective!

What is the Rule of Thirds?

The basic principle behind the rule of thirds is to imagine breaking an image down into thirds (both horizontally and vertically) so that you have 9 parts. As follows.



As you’re taking an image you would have done this in your mind through your viewfinder or in the LCD display that you use to frame your shot.

With this grid in mind the ‘rule of thirds’ now identifies four important parts of the image that you should consider placing points of interest in as you frame your image.

Not only this – but it also gives you four ‘lines’ that are also useful positions for elements in your photo.



The theory is that if you place points of interest in the intersections or along the lines that your photo becomes more balanced and will enable a viewer of the image to interact with it more naturally. Studies have shown that when viewing images that people’s eyes usually go to one of the intersection points most naturally rather than the center of the shot – using the rule of thirds works with this natural way of viewing an image rather than working against it.

In addition to the above picture of the bee where the bee’s eye becomes the point of focus here are some of examples:




Another Rule of Thirds Example

In this image I’ve purposely placed the head of my subject on one of the intersecting points – especially his eyes which are a natural point of focus for a portrait. His tie and flower also take up a secondary point of interest.



In this shot I’ve placed the subject along a whole line which means she is considerably off center and therefore creating an additional point of interest. Placing her right in the center of the frame could have resulted in an ‘awkward’ shot.

In a similar way a good technique for landscape shots is to position horizons along one of the horizontal lines also as I’ve done with the following shot (I’ll let you imagine the lines).



Using the Rule of Thirds comes naturally to some photographers but for many of us takes a little time and practice for it to become second nature.

In learning how to use the rule of thirds (and then to break it) the most important questions to be asking of yourself are:

What are the points of interest in this shot?
Where am I intentionally placing them?
Once again – remember that breaking the rule can result in some striking shots – so once you’ve learnt it experiment with purposely breaking it to see what you discover.

Lastly – keep the rule of thirds in mind as you edit your photos later on. Post production editing tools today have good tools for cropping and reframing images so that they fit within the rules. Experiment with some of your old shots to see what impact it might have on your photos.
 
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