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2020 Silverado 4WD LTZ Duramax Crew Cab
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Those are actually called jounce bumpers ... not to be confused with the old bump stops.

They are part of the suspension system providing a progressive resistance as the control arm movement “squishes” them.

Once they “squish” to a certain point they will then act as a bump stop.

The spec is to adjust the torsion bars to where the jounce bumpers are just touching the stops.

Hopefully that answers your question.
Yes, that does answer my question. That tells me my torsion bars on a stock truck are cranked a little to much because I can stick my finger in between the jounce stop and the LCA.
 

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2020 Silverado 4WD LTZ Duramax Crew Cab
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Well, I have certainly not seen it all and I’ll be one of the first people to say that nothing is perfect. However, I’ve spent 24 years wrenching on GM vehicles and a good portion of that specifically doing just steering, suspension and brake work at a large Chevy dealer in rural Michigan. I’ve never seen a tie rod end or idler arm break under the same conditions that yours did. That’s all I’m going to try to say. I’ve actually seen stock components last through more things than I would have ever put their through or thought they would last through. The 2001-2010 HD GM truck chassis set was certainly not as robust as it should have been, no doubt. Since then, GM has really stepped up their game. Again, nothing is perfect but my years of experience is certainly the opposite way of what your truck has done to you.
ChevyTech77 what is your recommendations on this:
I have a 2020 Silverado 2500HD LTZ everything is stock. I now have 26k miles on it, so far the dealership has replaced the tires 4 times because of the rough ride, the mirrors shake when hitting just cracks in the highway.

I just picked it up again today from the dealership, they had it for 3 days, they did PICOSCOPE tests on it, they said the readings were within GM's standards, I have had this truck in and out of the dealership since I bought it brand new, at least 8 times now including tire replacements, it has got to the point where today when I picked it up I was invited to a conference with the service manager, technician, and the General Manager to talk about my truck.

I want to keep it stock height, I traded in a 2009 GMC Sierra 2500HD SLT that I also bought new and 210,000 miles on it, about a year before trading it in I put a 4" BDS lift on it and honestly the ride is either the same to worse on cold days to my new truck.

This truck had Good Years on it, then I had them put Michelin LTX/MS after two sets of those we went to Michelin LX/AT2 275/65 R20 tires, which are currently on it.

Mostly it is my day driver, but I do have a 36' travel trailer I pull from time to time.
I am asking for recommendations on what I can do to better the ride on my truck, anything from tires to shocks whatever you all can recommended will be greatly appreciated.
 

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When the vibration testing with Picoscope is accomplished, all the vibrations in the truck are analyzed. All moving parts of the truck produce vibrations to some degree - engine, transmission, driveshafts, differentials, tires, pumps, etc. The Picoscope measures the frequency, order of vibration (how many 'shakes' for each rotation), and magnitude. Based on these measures, the problem areas are identified. Generally, you go after the area with the highest magnitude to fix the problem. Most of the vibrations are not objectionable, but some may be. And your personal objection to one vibration may be different than another person's sensitivity. Speed also makes a difference, sometimes.

One question I have for you is "what area of vibration was the MOST prevalent from the Picoscope?" Tires? Does it feel like tires to you or do you have a different opinion? If you are on a very smooth piece of road to you perceive a tire vibration? What is different if you are on a somewhat rougher road? Did they run the test without tires? Or other tires from another truck known not to have tire balance problems? You said that even a crack in the highway would shake the mirrors. That doesn't sound like vibration to me but it may be just another problem.
 

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2020 Silverado 4WD LTZ Duramax Crew Cab
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When the vibration testing with Picoscope is accomplished, all the vibrations in the truck are analyzed. All moving parts of the truck produce vibrations to some degree - engine, transmission, driveshafts, differentials, tires, pumps, etc. The Picoscope measures the frequency, order of vibration (how many 'shakes' for each rotation), and magnitude. Based on these measures, the problem areas are identified. Generally, you go after the area with the highest magnitude to fix the problem. Most of the vibrations are not objectionable, but some may be. And your personal objection to one vibration may be different than another person's sensitivity. Speed also makes a difference, sometimes.

One question I have for you is "what area of vibration was the MOST prevalent from the Picoscope?" Tires? Does it feel like tires to you or do you have a different opinion? If you are on a very smooth piece of road to you perceive a tire vibration? What is different if you are on a somewhat rougher road? Did they run the test without tires? Or other tires from another truck known not to have tire balance problems? You said that even a crack in the highway would shake the mirrors. That doesn't sound like vibration to me but it may be just another problem.
Everything I feel is through the steering wheel and at times through the floor boards, it feel like there are no shocks on the front suspension.
 
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