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Interested in seeing our trucks with stock wheels and a lift.
I myself am thinking of keeping my 20x8.5 stockers, running 35s and a 4.5" BDS lift.
Interested in seeing how this looks as I do not want to buy new wheels.

Thanks guys!
 

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you can try to search customoffset.com, but it doesn't look like many people keep their stock rims. I could only find 3 GMCs with 20 x 9s.
 

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Generally the reason given to lift a truck is to get clearance for bigger tires/wheels. I guess you just want to be high and mighty but I don't get it. Not that I have to get it. It's your truck.
 

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Interested in seeing our trucks with stock wheels and a lift.
I myself am thinking of keeping my 20x8.5 stockers, running 35s and a 4.5" BDS lift.
Interested in seeing how this looks as I do not want to buy new wheels.

Thanks guys!
Any significant lift is going to have taller spindles which requires an aftermarket wheel to accommodate this alteration. The BDS 4.5" lift specifically states "Stock 17″, 18″, & 20″ wheels cannot be reinstalled".

Good luck!
 

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CST 3-6 allows for stock 20’s only. You will have to check tire fitment. On my truck I have about 1/2 or so between the tire and spindle. You can always get adapters/spacers to get more clearance
 

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Like it’s been said, lots of lifts require less offset on the wheels to clear the spindle. The 4” Full Throttle Suspension lift I put on my 11 allowed the use of 18x9” wheels with a +18 offset and cleared 35x12.5’s easy.
 

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Any significant lift is going to have taller spindles which requires an aftermarket wheel to accommodate this alteration. The BDS 4.5" lift specifically states "Stock 17″, 18″, & 20″ wheels cannot be reinstalled".

Good luck!
It all depends on the type and amount of lift whether stock wheels will work. Some people just crank up the torsion bars. That is a poor way to do it but you don't have to do anything with the wheels that way.

The steering knuckle fits inside the wheel with the ball joints and UCA being the part that sticks out the furthest. The hub is pretty much centered in the knuckle so the ball joints are more or less equally distant from the center of wheel rotation. When you lift the truck using a new knuckle, the center of rotation moves down in the knuckle causing the upper ball joint and control arm to come closer to the wheel. With 17 inch wheels there isn't much room so the amount of lift you can use is hardly worth the effort. With 20 inch wheels you have an additional 1.5 inches of room making the available lift more significant.

Aftermarket wheels can be machined to have a bit more clearance which allows for even more lift. Upper control arms that have a bend in them will not hit the wheel as soon so a little more lift is available. At some point you just plain run out of room to lift with any wheel. By the time you go to the limits of what can be done with steering knuckles you will have exceeded what can be done with the stock wheels. By going to 24" wheels or using other methods of lifting you can go much higher. A 24" wheel will typically have a taller tire too so you will gain some height there as well.

Things to consider when contemplating a lift are clearance, how are you going to get into a truck that is significantly higher, is it legal (almost certainly not), will the tires rub on the frame and body (almost certainly), will it increase the wear on the suspension (yep), what other parts will you need to make it work, will it still fit in your garage, can you afford $2000 worth of tires and wheels, can I sell it when the time comes, will it still be drivable, what will the ride be like, will the brakes work properly when they have less leverage, will I still be able to use the truck for the things I bought it for, how much will it hurt my fuel economy, will it still be reliable enough? Is what it gets you worth what it costs you?

As you might guess, I'm not a big fan of lifts. Especially I don't like the guys driving around in traffic with their bumper at eye level. My opinion should have some influence on your decision but ultimately it is your choice. I am guessing you will go ahead with a lift but I strongly advise moderation. The further you go from stock the more problems you will have. Others may say differently but it's always so.
 

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It all depends on the type and amount of lift whether stock wheels will work. Some people just crank up the torsion bars. That is a poor way to do it but you don't have to do anything with the wheels that way.

The steering knuckle fits inside the wheel with the ball joints and UCA being the part that sticks out the furthest. The hub is pretty much centered in the knuckle so the ball joints are more or less equally distant from the center of wheel rotation. When you lift the truck using a new knuckle, the center of rotation moves down in the knuckle causing the upper ball joint and control arm to come closer to the wheel. With 17 inch wheels there isn't much room so the amount of lift you can use is hardly worth the effort. With 20 inch wheels you have an additional 1.5 inches of room making the available lift more significant.

Aftermarket wheels can be machined to have a bit more clearance which allows for even more lift. Upper control arms that have a bend in them will not hit the wheel as soon so a little more lift is available. At some point you just plain run out of room to lift with any wheel. By the time you go to the limits of what can be done with steering knuckles you will have exceeded what can be done with the stock wheels. By going to 24" wheels or using other methods of lifting you can go much higher. A 24" wheel will typically have a taller tire too so you will gain some height there as well.

Things to consider when contemplating a lift are clearance, how are you going to get into a truck that is significantly higher, is it legal (almost certainly not), will the tires rub on the frame and body (almost certainly), will it increase the wear on the suspension (yep), what other parts will you need to make it work, will it still fit in your garage, can you afford $2000 worth of tires and wheels, can I sell it when the time comes, will it still be drivable, what will the ride be like, will the brakes work properly when they have less leverage, will I still be able to use the truck for the things I bought it for, how much will it hurt my fuel economy, will it still be reliable enough? Is what it gets you worth what it costs you?

As you might guess, I'm not a big fan of lifts. Especially I don't like the guys driving around in traffic with their bumper at eye level. My opinion should have some influence on your decision but ultimately it is your choice. I am guessing you will go ahead with a lift but I strongly advise moderation. The further you go from stock the more problems you will have. Others may say differently but it's always so.
I have to admit I laugh a little when I read a post on here about some guy trying to pull a GN/FW with a 3,000 lb pin weight using a lifted truck, and he finds out that the short sidewall tires on his 22 inch wheels can only handle about 2k lbs each. Nothing like realizing that the $5k of "upgrades" you did actually reduced the vehicle's capability significantly.
 

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I have to admit I laugh a little when I read a post on here about some guy trying to pull a GN/FW with a 3,000 lb pin weight using a lifted truck, and he finds out that the short sidewall tires on his 22 inch wheels can only handle about 2k lbs each. Nothing like realizing that the $5k of "upgrades" you did actually reduced the vehicle's capability significantly.
There are a few who have stylin' tires/wheels and then switch to towing/working wheels when needed but that's not my idea of a good plan. Then there is the issue of pulling from a location that is several inches higher and having to lift the trailer to match the truck. 1"-2" to fit the tire of choice? No problemo. 12" to look like the Stomper you played with as a child? Big problemo.

A fully legitimate use of a truck is as an ego booster/image enhancer. People from all walks of life have been doing that for ever. If that is what you are after then whatever works is fine. I'm not empowered to judge anyone else's life. I just hope your bumper doesn't come through my windshield some day.
 

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There are a few who have stylin' tires/wheels and then switch to towing/working wheels when needed but that's not my idea of a good plan. Then there is the issue of pulling from a location that is several inches higher and having to lift the trailer to match the truck. 1"-2" to fit the tire of choice? No problemo. 12" to look like the Stomper you played with as a child? Big problemo.

A fully legitimate use of a truck is as an ego booster/image enhancer. People from all walks of life have been doing that for ever. If that is what you are after then whatever works is fine. I'm not empowered to judge anyone else's life. I just hope your bumper doesn't come through my windshield some day.
I agree. If you understand the costs and effects of the mods you make, then go for it. But a lot of folks throw significant amounts of money at these things with only a minimal understanding of the ramifications of what they're doing. And while Joe Schmoe may be able to shoehorn some "sweet looking" suspension components into/onto his rig, I sincerely doubt the ability of anyone who does not have a working knowledge of systems of differential equations to fully comprehend the effects on handling and load carrying that follow a suspension "upgrade". That said, I will say that some of the 2-4" lifts I've seen on this forum look pretty nice, and probably don't do too much to the handling/capacity of the vehicle as long as the wheel diameter isn't increased (and the tire diameter isn't increased dramatically without re-gearing the diffs) much. But I'm a boring utilitarian at heart (and one who has to use parking garages often) so that stuff isn't for me.

As an amusing aside, I was once flipping through the pages of the BMW forum and came upon a young man who had "upgraded" his wheels to larger-than-stock ones with lower profile tires. Incidentally, he was from around "here" (NYC area) where potholes are all over the place, especially in winter/spring. On multiple occasions he'd lost chunks of his wheels due to pothole impacts. His intuition lead him to believe that he had too much pressure in his tires, and that it was this pressure that was transmitting overwhelming force to the wheels. Rather than explain the nature of scalar (pressure) and tensor (stress) fields, I told the guy that regardless of anything else, reducing tire pressure was not the solution.

More money (or credit) than brains.
 

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That’s why I only went up 4”, the rear lift was only 2 1/2”. I wanted to still be able to tow my gooseneck without fear of smashing the bed, or my bumper pull without having a mile long receiver hanging down.
 

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This helps me as I just got my first diesel and pick-up.. 2016 Silverado 2500HD LTZ crew cab. I have basically went from wanting to do a 4.5" BDS lift to now not wanting to waste the money. I do already have 20" rims, but I want black ones and little bit bigger or more aggressive looking tires, and that is only mod I want to do to Lift/tires/wheels area. When looking online at Rims I want to get i notice it asks specifically for stock, 3", 6" etc on lift and then it affects the offset of the rims.. stock and it's only an 18mm offset, any lift and it's like 44MM, which means I am going to get that deep, deep lip on the rim, so face of rim is set so deep in the tire, I do not want that look, so stock will look best for what I am trying to accomplish and still have that couple finger width lip on the rim.
Stock tires are 265/60/20 for 20" rims and no lift.. but how can i know what size i can go up to in tire height and width without rubbing or causing issues?

The black/gray chevy with black rims at the top of this page/forum all the way to the right is the look I love/want for my truck.

sure appreciate any other helpful tips you may have, but I know i can just ask a dealer as well.
 

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There are lots of reasons people get lifts but near the top of anyone's excuse list is so that they can fit larger tires. The wider the tires get the more likely they are to rub on the inside and on the front. Big tires look nice to most people but there is a price. Staying conservative is a good plan.

The best place I know of to find out what tires and rims go together is on tirerack.com. They have lots of guides with ample information on fit and other issues.

I suspect you will want to push the boundaries of what is possible so may I suggest that when you go to buy you work it out with the tire store that you can do a short test drive to verify the fit. Then do things like drive over curbs with the steering at full lock to be sure that nothing interferes at any point.
 

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Here is my 2017 CCSB L5P Denali with a Cognito 4-6 turned down about as low as it would go on 37x12.50 Toyo MT's on stock wheels and Bilstein 5100's.
 

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This is mine with a 4” lift, the wheels are 18x9 with a +18 offset so they don’t stick out and 35x12.5’s. Makes for a good looking, useable truck that’s not gonna beat the paint to hell with the wheels sticking way out
 

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I have the exact same truck 2015. Trying to do a BDS 4.5" with fox, dealer is telling me I can't use the same wheels (same as yours) Currently running the toyo 35 12.50 with keys turned up. Which cognito kit did you go with?
 
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