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Discussion Starter #1
Im about to graduate high school and my love for vehicles is causing me to consider technical schools like wyotech or uti.
Is anyone a graduate from wyotech or uti and what degree?
I love diesels and performance anything. But i also like to paint and body work. I dont know what field to go to. Like i said if anyones graduates from there tell me a little about it and how you liked it.
thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
^^sub?
 

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sandwitch...lol no
im interested in this thread. im about to get out of highschool and going to enroll in diesel tech at my local college and want to hear other peoples experiences with classes also broski:thumb
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
lol oh ok. i was like sandwich wow!
yea man my autotech teacher said wyotech is the best but ive heard uti is the best. i just wanna go somewhere that everyone knows exactly what they are doing and teaches the right stuff!
 

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Look up kman he just graduated from a tech school.. Forget ehich one though

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Didn't go to either of these schools but heres some advice. I was in the same shoes as you, didn't know for sure what I wanted. Ended up taking Auto Body. Don't regret it one bit but wish I would have taking Auto Tech also. So what I'm getting at is take auto tech, you will use it all the time in auto body. If you decide you don't want to turn wrenches take Auto Body.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
i have a bad temper so when thinks go wrong i loose it so idk if i can do mechanic work for too long but i think i could paint all my life.. just dont really know where the moneys at. i would think diesel mechanic would bring alot more than collision repair/paint.
 

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Depends what you want to do, my recommendation is to figure out an idea. Do you want to work on diesel or gas engines? Over the highway trucks, diesel engines, heavy equipment, or what?

I recommend looking at Cat Think Big or John Deere's version of the program if that is the direction you are trying to go. Getting setup with a manufacturer's program gives you better job opportunities, I've seen a LOT of tech school graduates leave and have to essentially start over in the Cat Think Big program or at the bottom of the totem pole after spending a LOT of money to get an education.
 

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Im not sure where you're located, but a bunch of my friends went/go to UNOH. University of Northen Ohio for diesel mechanic. I guess they have a real good program from what im told. I know a kid at Wyotech, he loves it.
 

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I went to unoh and checked it out and loved it. The programs the offer are amazing. Snap on you get half off. They have a sled pulling truck you can use and drive. UTI is nothing but book work. And at unoh its 75 percent hands on and the other is book work. I hate book work and would rather it be as hands on as possible. UNOH offers it and all my friends go there and love it. For one of the classes my buddy has done nothing but work on his truck because they let you. They also had a brand new dyno in the shop that you could use when ever you wanted.
 

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I went to WyoTech back in 2001. It was a much better school before they changed ownership in 2001. They became more of a business and about making money. They got all new equipment, but let all the great instructors go or take major pay cuts.

I really didn't learn much at Wyotech. I had a great teacher in High School and got a job working at a Auto Shop over a year before I left for WyoTech. I got top grades despite having issues with an instructor (whom didn't like being corrected by a student). There were only 2 instructors that had been there for more than a year (because of the buy out). They were great, but the newer ones all were not nearly as experienced. It is frustrating that the only questions I had, weren't able to be answered by the instructors.


Benefit is getting the degree in less than a year. It is also a well known Tech School, which gets attention from major dealerships in larger cities.

Problem is most smaller town shops don't care as much about where you went to school, they will look at actual experience much more favorably.

Best way to do it is to get the degree from a well known place like UTI or WyoTech and go to work right away in a big city making good $$ and getting the break in experience for 3-5 years and get your Master ASE certification. Then move wherever you want with some experience, and credentials that will get attention wherever you go.

If I would do it over and plan on staying in the Tech field I would go to a Tech College near the twin cities that I've talked to many graduates of. They aren't very well known, but they had a great program and some of the best instructors around back 6-8 years ago when I was re-evaluating my choices.

I found Diesel starting pay was 10-25% higher than auto when I got out. I got my associates degree in Auto/Diesel, and went from Auto before school to Diesel after. I liked Diesel much more. It was nice to be able to fit my hands in what I was working on. Plus having a Dyno at work was awesome.
 

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I went to UTI. Graduated from auto diesel and industrial and also took their ford training program. It was a good school and had a lot to offer. But they don't offer any regular college courses so you don't get a degree, you get a certificate. You should also look into your local community colleges they offer manufacturer program where you get sponsored by a dealership and work for them every other session and go to class in between, by doing this you can get college level education and tech school at the same time.
I only bring this up because I am going back to college now (10 years after high school ) and it is a lot harder then if I would have done it then. You never know you my change your mind on your career and want to do something else. You would be a step ahead if you go to a regular college than going to a trade school.
I know several people that went to trade schools and have nothing but good things to say. Just something to think about.


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Discussion Starter #14
so do they know there stuff? with a degree from them once you get out of school are you pretty much guaranteed a job?
i wanna have fun where ever i go and have good experience but i wanna graduate with a degree that dealerships or mechanic shops throw their selves at you to work for them.
 

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i have a bad temper so when thinks go wrong i loose it so idk if i can do mechanic work for too long but i think i could paint all my life.. just dont really know where the moneys at. i would think diesel mechanic would bring alot more than collision repair/paint.
Well if you can't handle mechanic work you won't be able to handle paint work. It requires a lot of patients, if you get in a hurry, the vehicle will show it. Things go bad in a paint shop just as much as anything else. Also when you take tours of these schools, pay attention of what they are doing. Most of these bigger schools like to teach by the book. That means a lot of class room time. I went to a smaller school, 40 student in my class. We spent about 30min to 1 hr in classroom per day. Every thing else was hands on, which was great. When problems arose, just like in everyday shops we got them fixed so we knew what to do when we were actually out "on the job". Just remember, patients is the key, and nothing works unless you do.
 

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I went to NTI (NASCAR Technical Institute) which is just a UTI with a NASCAR program, I had alot of fun there (mostly in the racing stuff) but I had worked at a couple smaller shops before I started there and knew everything that was being taught the first few months. My main goal going through it was to go to a manufacturer program. I ended up going to BMW's program (BMW STEP) and loved it, I'm now workin at a dealer and have been there a year, its decent money and the people are really awesome to work with, but if you cant handle stress.....a dealership is not for you.....plain and simple. Everything that you work on needs to be done yesterday and parts wont be here til tomorrow. As soon as it gets on the road i'll be moving and opening a shop with a buddy of mine doing diesel performance.
 

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Im in tech school right now. For diesel tech. In my opinon, your local schools would be the best if you have one. The wyotech thing, im not sure of but the "big" one in nashville is pretty crappy. For 30,000 less dollars im getting the same degree in my hometown and my teacher has been a machinist/mechanic for over 35 years before he started teaching 3 years ago.

I love it
 

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so do they know there stuff? with a degree from them once you get out of school are you pretty much guaranteed a job?
i wanna have fun where ever i go and have good experience but i wanna graduate with a degree that dealerships or mechanic shops throw their selves at you to work for them.
Yes they know their stuff, if you are completely new it will be a lot to take in, if you know the basics you might get bored at first till there is something new. You DO NOT get a degree, you get a certificate. The difference being that in order to get a degree of any type you must have general education ( math, social sciences, english, and science courses). Honestly no one is gonna come to you because of where you went to school, they help a lot in finding you job leads, but it's on you to sell yourself.
There are no guarantees in life, you get out what you put in.
Remember with auto/diesel tech jobs hands on experience is what the look for. You will never learn all there is to know form school.



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We've had a few employees come out of wyotech and they did good bodywork and paint. Shops will always look at your experience. Im in the same boat as you but I have had a ton of experience working in our restoration shop. Close to 5 years now but haven't done body work. I talked to our regional wyotech representative and he was an IDIOT!!!!. I had to correct him on several aspects of a real shop. I liked how wyotech offered a business management aspect of things and was pretty interested. but i have decided to take 2 years off from school and make sure i know what i want to do. I see so many kids waste money in college partying and failing that if i decide to spend the money on an education i aint gonna waste it. If you do want to do paint, we have an employee that went to a paint specific school in oregon and he does amazing work. We also have an employee who went to mcpherson college and has work on ferrari's and extremely high dollar cars and doesn't do quite the quality work. Sorry for the huge lecture but its an expensive decision to make just take your time and ask a lot of other people and learn from their mistakes
 
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