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Discussion Starter #1
Single rear wheel 3500hd, cc, lb
I've got a 32' 5th wheel, and am about to have a hitch installed on the back of the camper.
1st I wanna make sure I'm not too far away from what the truck is suggested as capable but getting alot of mixed info online about what the truck can pull.
The camper is 11k and dual axle trailer with toys is about 3500.
Pin weight is about 1800.
My truck with me and a full tank of diesel weighs 8k on the nose.
So how much weight is safe for my truck to pull?
 

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That truck will pull anything you hitch to it, and do a fine job of it, too. But what you asked will return a bunch of "mixed info." It's the nature of forums. 14,500/22,500 isn't bad for your truck, I used to tow more than that with the same truck and a 6.0.

But let the games begin.
 

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I'd be more concerned with the frame on the 5er being able to properly support a receiver hitch and the TW of whatever you plan to hook it to. And also, the cantilever effect on the frame in reducing your PW on your truck with the added TW on the rear.

5ers are not known for their frame strength (cough, cough, Lippert) in dealing with their own weight, much less the add-on to the rear.
 

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Seen a few that tried this and how the rear frame on the 5th wheel camper where the new hitch was welded failed. One hit a big U shaped bump and the last trailer bounced and broke the camper frame and the other blew 2 tires on one side of the last trailer and it started whipping and also busted the frame. Those camper frames aren't made near thick enough for when something "bad" happens.
See quite a few pulling them that way nowadays and it is fine until something goes South. Also what is your insurance company going to do when you caused a big wreck with others involved and your insurance tries to get out of paying because it wasn't a Legit setup.
I often tell others, "just because you can doesn't mean you should". Fitting quite often in todays world.
Good luck and just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am having a cert welding company do it which apparently is a thing in Montana which I could understand for the concerns mentioned. When we would pull a 2nd trailer wouldn't be often or very far, just someplace close by to boondocks on the weekend and have some fun with ATV and side by side. But yes, structural integrity is a very important thing.
 

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It's not about how good or proper the welding of the receiver hitch to the frame rails is. It's about the frame rails themselves, used in constructing the 5er and their ability to handle the added stress of a receiver on the rear and the tongue weight from the 2nd trailer, applied to the hitch....and in turn applied to the frame rails.

About the only thing you can do is to contact the manufacturer of the 5er and whether or not they would approve of the modification to the frame rails.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That's a good idea, I think I will do that.
Of coarse for liability reasons though they would probably say no anyway... But I'll pick their brain.
 

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Crawl under the rear and take a look. Most times those frame rails are only thin C channel, not heavy I beams like you'd see on a deck over GN. ToyHaulers may be differnet, needing that extra frame strength to support a garage of toys on the rear. But most 5ers are just enough to get by with.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok so if c rail, maybe not a good idea to add a hitch. If I beam it at least makes it possible...
 

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Ok so if c rail, maybe not a good idea to add a hitch. If I beam it at least makes it possible...
I seriously doubt there's an I-beam anywhere in there. C-channels can be plenty strong, but you just have to make sure you're attaching the receiver to the C-channel itself and not a subframe or other structure that's not designed to bear significant stress. I installed a receiver on the back of my TT a couple of years ago and loaded it up with about 200 lbs of crap. This is with a hitch extension to boot; the center of the load is probably a good three feet back from the end of the receiver, so the forces I'm putting on this thing far exceed the tongue load from a 3,500 lb trailer. I've pulled it about 18,000 miles since then with only one problem: the bolts that hold the receiver cross-tube into the brackets, which should never be under any significant load since the brackets themselves should be resisting the "twisting" of the cross tube, sheared off inside the tube since the receiver wasn't preloaded and the design did not tolerate any relative movement of the cross tube and the brackets. I had just finished hiking Guadalupe Peak and happened to notice that the cross tube had shifted in the brackets and realized what had happened. I didn't have much spare hardware with me but I was able to patch things up by drilling a hole on the right side all the way through the bracket and cross tube (from the factory there was only a hole on the side facing the rear of the receiver) and putting a carriage bolt through there and securing it with a pair of nuts.

Sorry for posting a bunch of pics but this is a potentially dangerous design flaw that you should be aware of if you're planning to have an aftermarket hitch put on a trailer.















 

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Yeah I answered the original question but then all the doubles towing concerns popped up. I've done it with a 5er with a lighter rect tubing frame. It's do-able but not with 3500# hooked on. Many of the newer, larger 5ers have I-beam under them and actually have receiver hitch and lighting receptacle options. Good idea to look under the camper for I-beam and also check out the camper specs for towing behind. I don't think you're going to see a substantial tow behind rating on the 5er unless it has I-beam members.
 

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Single rear wheel 3500hd, cc, lb
I've got a 32' 5th wheel, and am about to have a hitch installed on the back of the camper.
1st I wanna make sure I'm not too far away from what the truck is suggested as capable but getting alot of mixed info online about what the truck can pull.
The camper is 11k and dual axle trailer with toys is about 3500.
Pin weight is about 1800.
My truck with me and a full tank of diesel weighs 8k on the nose.
So how much weight is safe for my truck to pull?
Yeah I answered the original question but then all the doubles towing concerns popped up. I've done it with a 5er with a lighter rect tubing frame. It's do-able but not with 3500# hooked on. Many of the newer, larger 5ers have I-beam under them and actually have receiver hitch and lighting receptacle options. Good idea to look under the camper for I-beam and also check out the camper specs for towing behind. I don't think you're going to see a substantial tow behind rating on the 5er unless it has I-beam members.
I think the original question was about double towing.

I just bought a new (fifth wheel) trailer, but I don't know if the frame is constructed from I-beams. That would certainly be a plus, especially since it came with a receiver pre-installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So it looks like I do have I beams. And the other picture is like some kindof rear crossmember or something.
 

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says;

16,500 pounds

The burly Duramax 6.6-liter turbodiesel V8, which boasts 365 hp and 660 lb-ft of torque, is optional and comes matched to a heavy-duty Allison six-speed automatic. Properly equipped, the 3500 can haul up to 5,307 pounds and tow up to 16,500 pounds (with a fifth-wheel hitch).
 
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