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Discussion Starter #1
Years ago I was a truck driver in the Army and gained a decent bit of experience operating a variety of heavy vehicles, from military-specific equipment like HETs and HEMTTs to trucks that have more obvious civilian counterparts such as 800- and 900-series tractor trailers. As it so happens, I was grandfathered (written test and DOT physical only) into a class A CDL that I have never used, and have no real intent to use. Nevertheless, I'm curious: if I were to rent a class A or B vehicle from, say, Ryder Truck, what legal documentation would I require in order to operate it legally? I'm not talking about HAZMAT or tanks or anything like that; just a box truck/trailer. Thanks for any information.
 

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I think--!! If the GVR is under 26k, you can operate with a class "C"-[regular license] in Calif, and assume the same for most states.
 

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Depends on what your doing with the truck. Moving? or hauling someone else's stuff for money.
 

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I think--!! If the GVR is under 26k, you can operate with a class "C"-[regular license] in Calif, and assume the same for most states.
Same in NC. I carry a Class B so we can drive our fleet around in the shop, but we cant hit the interstate. We don't have to have a physical since we are a municipality.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Depends on what your doing with the truck. Moving? or hauling someone else's stuff for money.
The only use case I can think of is moving, either my own stuff or a friend's, but not for money. I'm speaking specifically about vehicles that require a CDL to operate; let's assume a tandem-axle tractor and tandem-axle 45 foot box trailer. I assume I'd have to keep a log book and would be subject to the 11-hour-per-day operating restriction, but I'd like to know if there is any other documentation or paperwork I would be expected to produce if stopped by law enforcement or DOT.
 

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It depends on state, but I'm pretty sure you don't need a commercial license to run a big truck if not for money. Now I heard some states have non cdl class licensing for large vehicles.

The hours of service laws do not apply to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It depends on state, but I'm pretty sure you don't need a commercial license to run a big truck if not for money. Now I heard some states have non cdl class licensing for large vehicles.

The hours of service laws do not apply to you.
Okay, so when people refer to DOT regulating (and pulling over) commercial vehicles, are they talking about the USDOT (as opposed to individual states' respective departments of transportation)? If so, it would then make sense that if USDOT does not regulate non-commercial use of heavy vehicles, the only remaining concern is state level licensing requirements for the operator and vehicle class.

On another note, how exactly would I "prove" that I'm not operating the truck on a professional basis?
 

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I would think documentation of the short term lease of the truck would be proof enough. Another thing you could do is stop in at local weigh station and ask questions there.
 

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Logs dont pertain unless you are within air mile range, im a 31 year union driver all local and dont do logs, heavy construction in NYC.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Logs dont pertain unless you are within air mile range, im a 31 year union driver all local and dont do logs, heavy construction in NYC.
What do you mean by "air miles range"? Haven't heard that term before.

NYC huh? My office is on 46th Street by 6th Ave.
 

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Small world, just finished up our phase of the kew gardens interchange. Based on your geographic location I'm guessing you're in jewelry LOL the term air miles is in the Federal Motor Carrier booklet it refers to your home base and not traveling outside a certain radius if you meet the criteria logs are not required so basically local construction Etc
 

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You will have to have a current medical card. Rules and laws concerning CDL's are governed by feds. States can add their additional items but cannot delete any fed regs. CDL is required for anything over 26k. There are few exceptions- mainly for agricultural uses.
You also have to decide if you will operate intrastate or interstate.

I would think if you have rented a truck for your personal use, like to move your own stuff, then you wouldn't be required to keep logbooks. (Electronic books now required I believe)
In my case, I have a CDL because of the weights-- truck and trailer gross about 36k with full load of horses.
As a side note, most LEO's if they were to pull you over ( kinda rare) will go by data plate gvwr not what you actually have on board.
 

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The "air miles" only apply to farmers operating within that circle with their vehicle.
If you rented the truck you described, you will need a class "A" CDL.
How long since you renewed your license?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Small world, just finished up our phase of the kew gardens interchange. Based on your geographic location I'm guessing you're in jewelry LOL the term air miles is in the Federal Motor Carrier booklet it refers to your home base and not traveling outside a certain radius if you meet the criteria logs are not required so basically local construction Etc
Yep, 46 is full of jewellers but I'm actually in finance. We just moved our offices from 1270 AoA to the IGT last year.
 

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i work for ryder as a tech, you would need a medical card and your license, proof of insurance. anything over 26k is considered class b cdl but if your holding a class a then your all good
 

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If you are operating a vehicle for personal use, you can operate anything up to class 8 without falling under DOT regs. As soon as you start making money for your drive, 26,000 lbs for a straight truck and you need a class B. Tow a trailer over 10,000 lbs and you need a class A.
Local hauls do not require log book, Last I checked, 150 miles from base station. Ag falls under a similar exception.
DOT does not have their own cops. The feds grant it to the states who have their state cops or specialized department handle them.

Edit: aside from obvious Safety concerns. States can only enforce state specific laws on vehicles registered in their state.
 
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