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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, my truck (details in sig) doesn't get driven much these days between COVID, and the fact that it isn't my DD anymore as well. So it is pretty common for it to sit for 2-3 weeks at a time between drives. I do try and drive it at least every two weeks or so (COVID has me working from home so not really going anywhere but for groceries these days) to keep things lubricated but its during these drives that I notice my batteries are a bit low. Truck starts and everything but you can tell it isn't turning over with as much oomph as it should.

I did replace both batteries together I don't know about 6-10 months ago. And everything works fine, but obviously something is slow draining the batteries while it sits. Here is my list of possible (most obvious) culprits:
  • LED RGB Halo's - I wired these myself. There are 4 halo's around the headlights, that hard wire to the battery for power, then I have them connected to a switch under the dash. I'm certainly not a pro wiring guy, but my thought was that the switch (with has no LED light or anything) that kills power to them, would cut off any drain when not in use. Am I wrong on this?
  • Aftermarket stereo - I have a stock headunit but there is a RF 300watt amp wired and two subs behind the rear seat. I know I've watched in the past that once the truck is turned off the light on the amp stays on, but after a set time (guessing 2mins) it turns off. I'm assuming it was wired so when it no longer receives a signal it powers off.
  • LED bed lights - I have two strips of LED bed lights that I wired up to a pin switch and then tapped into the trailer wiring hardness (which has constant power on) so when I open the tailgate it turns the lights on, when I close it it turns them off. It all works as its supposed to so again I don't think this is the culprit, and they are LED's so shouldn't pull too much power anyways.
Those are my most obvious thoughts. I did buy a trickle charger that I plug it into, but since I park my truck outside and don't want to leave the trickle charger exposed to weather, I have to park the truck up close to my garage, yet still out of the way so my wife can get in/out which is less than ideal when I'm still using it fairly regularly.

Any thoughts, suggestions are appreciated.
 

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Can you go to the fuse block and look for drain with a volt meter? Tedious i know, but it seems Fail safe.
 

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Do you not keep a tender on it? Mine sets as well but I always keep a battery tender on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Can you go to the fuse block and look for drain with a volt meter? Tedious i know, but it seems Fail safe.
Good idea.

Do you not keep a tender on it? Mine sets as well but I always keep a battery tender on it.
Yeah last sentence. I do have a trickle charger OR battery tender that I can hook it up to, and which I have currently plugged in after moving the truck today and noticing the batteries seemed low. But 2 weeks and draining a dual battery setup I'd rather find the cause than have to plug it in all the time.
 

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The only truly accruate test of a lead acid battery is a carbon pile load test.

Before I spent a bunch of time trying to chase down a drain I would,

A. Check static battery voltage before cranking, after long soak.

B. Disconnect all aftermarket electrical add ons

The older trucks don’t have many modules in them and a slight slow crank (or at least that’s what I’m perceiving) after two weeks time, isn’t going to be caused by a very large draw. Probably be difficult to catch the draw if there is actually one.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
The only truly accruate test of a lead acid battery is a carbon pile load test.

Before I spent a bunch of time trying to chase down a drain I would,

A. Check static battery voltage before cranking, after long soak.

B. Disconnect all aftermarket electrical add ons

The older trucks don’t have many modules in them and a slight slow crank (or at least that’s what I’m perceiving) after two weeks time, isn’t going to be caused by a very large draw. Probably be difficult to catch the draw if there is actually one.
Thanks for the reply. So a slow crank is accurate. Basically it sounds like its probably not worth chasing, and just plug it into my battery tender, and forget about it since it'll be hard to source. Appreciate your input!!
 

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I was not trying to sound like an ass. after reading on hear everyone says if you don’t drive it regularly to keep it on a charger. That way it don’t kill the batteries.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was not trying to sound like an ass. after reading on hear everyone says if you don’t drive it regularly to keep it on a charger. That way it don’t kill the batteries.
Oh sorry, I in no way thought you were being an ass, and sorry if my response was snarky, was not the intent. I was just pointing out that I do indeed have a tender. I do appreciate your response.
 
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