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Watched this VSE video on their filter solution. In his discussion, he shows fuel system parts downstream of the OEM filter showing rust and corrosion. He then talks about how their system functions “just like OEM”. Also talks about how the competition’s deeper single filter solutions hold “more water” below the sensor. I’m not sure I follow how their system is any better than OEM with respect to the water issue. It almost seemed like it was tacitly implied it was a better water solution. If you have water in contact with fuel, and their fuel/water separator doesn’t have a “magic bullet” better removal solution for water from the fuel you will still have some emulsified water traveling downstream creating the same corrosion issues.

While I see the great value of the two filter system separating the functions, the superior filter setup (flimsy cartridge that can tear, plastic housing subject to wrench failure vs metal screw-on) I’m skeptical that it helps with the corrosion they show on the “relatively new”, as he says, fuel system internals. They need to run a side-by-side test of two identical L5Ps (OEM fuel filter vs VSE) driving the same route, fueling at the same stations/fuel pumps for the total miles of the fuel system they they had in their video or further. Then do a fuel system tear down and check for corrosion. If their system showed no water based corrosion and the OEM did then VSE could say they have the TOTAL magic fuel filtration bullet. He drops the ball after discussing the water based corrosion issue. The deeper water depth, holding more water longer before setting a code is problematic. But, if you have water just below the sensor you still have a water/fuel interface.

What the fuel/water separator needs is a glass bowl of old - much more convenient to check - bleed when you see water. Much better than putting it off because you need something to catch bled fuel to periodically bleed it because you are “wondering” if there is water. With glass, you look, SEE NO water, go on your way, little to no inconvenience/time involved.

He has a bit of a discussion regarding their flow characteristics being better than OEM (5micron) even though they have a finer(3micron) filter media. They have increased the filter area which decreases the pressure it takes to push fuel through the filter. Even though their filter “holes” are smaller (3 vs 5 microns), they have increased the effective “open” area for the fuel to flow through by increasing the amount of area of filter material. They have increased the number of “holes” for the fuel to flow through even though they are smaller. They get an “A+” for that improvement.

 

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I filled out VSE’s contact inquiry box asking them to add a fuel line clip video shot on their workbench to show operation of both release/retainer clips. I tried emailing them at both their info and sales emails. Got replies to both addresses that I didn’t have permission to email them, or it was broken or something. Typical business web contact thing. They set it up, it breaks and they don’t know. You’d think they would check those contact points once in a while.
 
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Watched this VSE video on their filter solution. In his discussion, he shows fuel system parts downstream of the OEM filter showing rust and corrosion. He then talks about how their system functions “just like OEM”. Also talks about how the competition’s deeper single filter solutions hold “more water” below the sensor. I’m not sure I follow how their system is any better than OEM with respect to the water issue. It almost seemed like it was tacitly implied it was a better water solution. If you have water in contact with fuel, and their fuel/water separator doesn’t have a “magic bullet” better removal solution for water from the fuel you will still have some emulsified water traveling downstream creating the same corrosion issues.

While I see the great value of the two filter system separating the functions, the superior filter setup (flimsy cartridge that can tear, plastic housing subject to wrench failure vs metal screw-on) I’m skeptical that it helps with the corrosion they show on the “relatively new”, as he says, fuel system internals. They need to run a side-by-side test of two identical L5Ps (OEM fuel filter vs VSE) driving the same route, fueling at the same stations/fuel pumps for the total miles of the fuel system they they had in their video or further. Then do a fuel system tear down and check for corrosion. If their system showed no water based corrosion and the OEM did then VSE could say they have the TOTAL magic fuel filtration bullet. He drops the ball after discussing the water based corrosion issue. The deeper water depth, holding more water longer before setting a code is problematic. But, if you have water just below the sensor you still have a water/fuel interface.

What the fuel/water separator needs is a glass bowl of old - much more convenient to check - bleed when you see water. Much better than putting it off because you need something to catch bled fuel to periodically bleed it because you are “wondering” if there is water. With glass, you look, SEE NO water, go on your way, little to no inconvenience/time involved.

He has a bit of a discussion regarding their flow characteristics being better than OEM (5micron) even though they have a finer(3micron) filter media. They have increased the filter area which decreases the pressure it takes to push fuel through the filter. Even though their filter “holes” are smaller (3 vs 5 microns), they have increased the effective “open” area for the fuel to flow through by increasing the amount of area of filter material. They have increased the number of “holes” for the fuel to flow through even though they are smaller. They get an “A+” for that improvement.

You can add the bowl setup to any of the drainable Donaldson water separators.
 

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2019 Silverado 2500HD L5P Crew Cab
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I couldn't find a good video. post #7 in this thread I outlined how I did it. it isn't that hard once you understand how the tabs work. what makes it hard is trying to go too fast. you would really have to try hard to break them intentionally.

it was harder getting the electrical connector off because of the lack of space.
Thanks, and thanks for reaching out to them re: a video -- that would help tremendously.
 

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2022 GMC Sierra HD 2500 Denali Black Diamond Edition
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Watched this VSE video on their filter solution. In his discussion, he shows fuel system parts downstream of the OEM filter showing rust and corrosion. He then talks about how their system functions “just like OEM”. Also talks about how the competition’s deeper single filter solutions hold “more water” below the sensor. I’m not sure I follow how their system is any better than OEM with respect to the water issue. It almost seemed like it was tacitly implied it was a better water solution. If you have water in contact with fuel, and their fuel/water separator doesn’t have a “magic bullet” better removal solution for water from the fuel you will still have some emulsified water traveling downstream creating the same corrosion issues.

While I see the great value of the two filter system separating the functions, the superior filter setup (flimsy cartridge that can tear, plastic housing subject to wrench failure vs metal screw-on) I’m skeptical that it helps with the corrosion they show on the “relatively new”, as he says, fuel system internals. They need to run a side-by-side test of two identical L5Ps (OEM fuel filter vs VSE) driving the same route, fueling at the same stations/fuel pumps for the total miles of the fuel system they they had in their video or further. Then do a fuel system tear down and check for corrosion. If their system showed no water based corrosion and the OEM did then VSE could say they have the TOTAL magic fuel filtration bullet. He drops the ball after discussing the water based corrosion issue. The deeper water depth, holding more water longer before setting a code is problematic. But, if you have water just below the sensor you still have a water/fuel interface.

What the fuel/water separator needs is a glass bowl of old - much more convenient to check - bleed when you see water. Much better than putting it off because you need something to catch bled fuel to periodically bleed it because you are “wondering” if there is water. With glass, you look, SEE NO water, go on your way, little to no inconvenience/time involved.

He has a bit of a discussion regarding their flow characteristics being better than OEM (5micron) even though they have a finer(3micron) filter media. They have increased the filter area which decreases the pressure it takes to push fuel through the filter. Even though their filter “holes” are smaller (3 vs 5 microns), they have increased the effective “open” area for the fuel to flow through by increasing the amount of area of filter material. They have increased the number of “holes” for the fuel to flow through even though they are smaller. They get an “A+” for that improvement.

Bad picture but works well for me. Running the fleece setup on my 22.
Hood Automotive tire Car Motor vehicle Vehicle
 

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2006 LBZ, 2009 LML, 2022 L5P. 1993 6.5 parked in the shed.
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Just a heads up, Donaldson only rates those bowls to 30psi. Twist drain is good to 90. Not sure why but noticed it in the catalog. I'll try and print it in here tomorrow.
 

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I was close, 30 bowl, 100 with Twist drain. Don't know if it's the seals or what as those bowls seem pretty solid, yours obviously is okay seeing ~60psi......but that's the spec.

Attachment is from their current fuel filtration catalog.
 

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2022 GMC Sierra HD 2500 Denali Black Diamond Edition
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I was close, 30 bowl, 100 with Twist drain. Don't know if it's the seals or what as those bowls seem pretty solid, yours obviously is okay seeing ~60psi......but that's the spec.

Attachment is from their current fuel filtration catalog.
Well dang. Never would have thought that the bowl would lower the pressure rating. Good catch piper one. I have put about 8k miles on the setup and no issues as of yet, I carry a spare filter with me. Guess I will be taking the bowl off now, don’t want to run into any issues
 

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Totally get you wanting to take it off...but it would be interesting to see if it held up. Guess it would be a pain though if it failed on ya on the road.
 
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Totally get you wanting to take it off...but it would be interesting to see if it held up. Guess it would be a pain though if it failed on ya on the road.
The bowl has the same seal as the twist drain so I assume it's the plastic housing. I ran the bowl before with no issues also.
 
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Totally get you wanting to take it off...but it would be interesting to see if it held up. Guess it would be a pain though if it failed on ya on the road.
I kept it on, put another 1400 miles on it over thanksgiving week. No issues yet, a few cold starts and heavy acceleration. Keeping another spare filter with me just in case
 

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2021 Silverado 2500HD LTZ L5P
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I kept it on, put another 1400 miles on it over thanksgiving week. No issues yet, a few cold starts and heavy acceleration. Keeping another spare filter with me just in case
I doubt you will have a issue as the filters are being drained by the hp4 high pressure pump while the lift pump is filling them up. I doubt they ever see very high pressures at all.
 

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no idea as there is not a pressure sensor in the filter head. while the system is under pressure and the left pump may say 60psi or 90psi it doesnt mean the entire low side jumps to that pressure instantly. that is just the output of the pump itself

you would have to know what draw pressure of the hp4 is and know the output of the lift pump and the fuel pressure in the filters will be the rough difference

the filters are a reservoir of fuel for the high pressure side and are constantly being drained. the lift pump keeps it filled.

unless your fuel gels or something is wrong with the lift pump or the pressure sensors at the lift pump or at the hp4 it's not going to overload the filters
 

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Saw this on other thread.

"For all of you that have an Idash or CT3, what is the lift pump pressure you guys are noticing?
Since the beginning of winter, I’ve been noticing the pressure on my truck upon start-up is around 85-90psi before it settle downs to 65-70 after full warm up.
Not sure if this is normal. Changed the fuel filter at the beginning of winter."
 

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Somebody that’s installed a billet cup with drain that has a pressure gauge, even an old school, could install the gauge in place of the drain, and have someone run the throttle. Wouldn’t be completely real world but an idea of pressures seen at the fuel/water cup. Or jury-rig a wire into the cab with a gauge (or to their Banks DataMonster??) for a temp situation to run a road-trip.
 
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