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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So when I bought my truck, it had some 60K mile old Michelin LTX A/S tires in the factory 245/75R16 Load E on it. Last fall, I swapped those out for brand new 265/75R16 Load E BFG A/T KO2s.

I pulled my 4500 lb enclosed snowmobile trailer around a few times this winter without issue. That trailer is 25’ long and usually runs right around 600-650 lbs of tongue weight. I don’t use any WD or sway control on it.

Fast forward to Memorial Day weekend and the first real haul of the wife’s 7,000 lb 30’ travel trailer. Running about 900-950 lbs tongue weight with the same Reese Dual Cam WD and sway control that I’ve had on all of our travel trailers including this one last summer.

The truck walked around on the tires something fierce. A lot like the past three half ton trucks that I’ve pulled our travel trailers with. Not confidence inspiring AT ALL. In a 10-15 mph wind it was everything I could do at times to keep everything on the road. Trailer wasn’t swaying, the truck just felt “mushy” Tires were inflated up to 80 psi cold, as well. I couldn’t even run the Michelin’s that high because it would ride so rough that it would beat your teeth out. I usually ran those down around 70 psi cold, when towing

No changes to the trailer load out.

Truck got new tie rods, idler and pitman this spring and wheel alignment back to where it was last summer.

No other changes to the truck other than tires.

In my over 25 years experience wrenching, I’ve never personally had to fix this sort of thing. All I have is big box tire stores around me so I don’t really trust any of the advice that I get from them (long stories to tell on that deal) so I’m looking to see what the haulers of the DF can share with me. I would go back to the Michelin’s but I need a beefier/more aggressive tread than that for my winter “excursions” that I sometimes get myself into. At this point I would also just like to keep the stock wheels and suspension on the truck as well. I’m probably missing something so if I am, ask away. Otherwise, let’s here what you’re running and your experiences.
 

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You might try the revo 3's Bridgestone. That's what I run on my Yukon. It towed a 4 horse bumper pull really good. Quiet on the road and good in the sand. Not as good in sand as the revo 2's but quieter on the road. About 12,000 lbs. mileage sucked though.
 

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Nick, have you thought about a separate winter tire and run something more geared toward highway for summer?

Personally like my Cooper AT3s and my camper is heavier than yours. Running them at 80psi as well.
 
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cooper at3 you will love them
 
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I had the same happen to me. Went from Michelin to BFG. Terrible tread squirm. Back to Michelin, no more problems. 18k GCVW.

I was very underwhelmed with the BFGs. Great for breaking snow trail greater than 12” and deep slush in the spring. I suspect the BFGs would also be superior off road but I don’t do that. Other than that, the plain looking, skinny 245s Michelin M/S is much better in nearly every condition.
 
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In my experience you're going to get that squishy feeling with just about any A/T. They'll be pretty decent for a little offroad and nasty conditions but to get that good highway handling you're looking for when towing a load, you won't beat a good H/T. I've ran Bridgestone R500HD for towing and couldn't love them much more. Many guys around me were running Michelins but I got better treadwear and spent considerably less. I had good luck getting around in some pretty good snow with them in 4wd when the tires were in the first half of the treadwear. After the tread was worn down to about half they got a little slick to get much traction, but that was after about 100k miles so it didn't really break my heart. I'm talking about a dually but a few years ago I ran the same tire on a SRW 3500 and really liked them on it too.

I don't know how long I can take the Goodyear A/T's on the new ride. The squishy feel I can deal with for a while but they're certainly some rock throwing bastards. I don't know how long I'm going to put up with that.
 

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One thing to remember is that 265's have a minimum wheel width of 7". My 2008 CCLB 3/4 ton came with 6 1/2" wheels and I switched to the larger 1 ton stock steel wheels since running the 265's. The 6 1/2" wheel makes the tread more rounded, maybe even less road contact vs 7".
 
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Been running Michelins on mine since the factory junk tires wore out (completely bald) at 28,000 miles. I've towed 10k+ lbs loads thousands and thousands of miles. Even towed 13k lbs load over 1,000 miles. Never experienced what you have with the BFG. The Michelins are good for about 60k miles and at 422k miles, I've been thru a few sets of them.
 

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X3 on the Cooper AT3s but I’m not a heavy hauler. Loaded camper and all was maybe 8000lbs. Have run 265s on the stock 2500 wheels with no issues for over 6 years…. Not saying that makes it right, just my experience.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Nick, have you thought about a separate winter tire and run something more geared toward highway for summer?

Personally like my Cooper AT3s and my camper is heavier than yours. Running them at 80psi as well.
Considering that I now have to buy ANOTHER set of tires for this thing, that’s more than likely what will happen Ryan. I’m not happy about it because if I was going to run a designated winter tire (like I do on my work car in the winter) I would run a set of Blizzaks or something like that. An ACTUAL snow/ice tire. Towing my enclosed sled trailer can get dicey on winter roads so I need the good traction. I was hoping to just have one set of tires/wheels for this thing for now, until I put a small lift in it, sometime down the road a ways.

One thing to remember is that 265's have a minimum wheel width of 7". My 2008 CCLB 3/4 ton came with 6 1/2" wheels and I switched to the larger 1 ton stock steel wheels since running the 265's. The 6 1/2" wheel makes the tread more rounded, maybe even less road contact vs 7".
GMT-800 3500 SRW were available with the 6.5” aluminums that I have and while I agree that they might slightly wear better on a 7”+ wheel, I don’t think these BFGs would tow/haul that much better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The Cooper AT3’s are on my short list for sure but if they don’t work as well as the Michelin’s when towing, I’m not sure I would go that route. Glad to hear that my thinking, and research thus far, is on par with what everyone is saying here, so far.
 

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2017 GMC Denali 2500HD, 3.5" Rough Country Lift, 305/55R20 Yokohama Geolandar A/T
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FWIW, I had Hankook Dynapro AT2's on my LMM and I was really happy with them both towing and not. They were also good for snow packed roads, but I never pulled with my truck in the snow, either.
 

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The Cooper AT3’s are on my short list for sure but if they don’t work as well as the Michelin’s when towing, I’m not sure I would go that route. Glad to hear that my thinking, and research thus far, is on par with what everyone is saying here, so far.
I have AT3’s on my new one and had Michelin’s on my Ford. I think if I had to do it over again I’d buy another set of Michelin’s as I feel they have better road manners. I might try running higher pressure since Ryan says he’s running 80psi and I’ve had mine at 60 front and 65 rear.
 

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2021 Sierra AT4 diesel

I use the original equalizer hitch. Equal-i-zer® Hitch | The Original Sway Control and Weight Distribution Hitch

Drove from Utah out to Missouri to buy a new RPOD 202 (approx 5,000 lbs) travel trailer in February.

I replaced the factory GY Trail Hawk tires with BFG KO2s. I prefer KO2s on my Jeep and Truck.

PSI running out and back on that trip was set at 40. No problem hauling trailer back and I was flying on I-40 passing trucks at over 80 MPH at times.

Now the weather has warmed up the PSI is set to 55. No problems hauling the trailer around either.

Before you toss the tire try running it at 55-60 PSI instead of 80.

Molon Labe
 

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2017 GMC Denali 2500HD, 3.5" Rough Country Lift, 305/55R20 Yokohama Geolandar A/T
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2021 Sierra AT4 diesel

I use the original equalizer hitch. Equal-i-zer® Hitch | The Original Sway Control and Weight Distribution Hitch

Drove from Utah out to Missouri to buy a new RPOD 202 (approx 5,000 lbs) travel trailer in February.

I replaced the factory GY Trail Hawk tires with BFG KO2s. I prefer KO2s on my Jeep and Truck.

PSI running out and back on that trip was set at 40. No problem hauling trailer back and I was flying on I-40 passing trucks at over 80 MPH at times.

Now the weather has warmed up the PSI is set to 55. No problems hauling the trailer around either.

Before you toss the tire try running it at 55-60 PSI instead of 80.

Molon Labe

What's the thought process behind a lower pressure though? Why wouldn't you want more air pressure to stiffen the sidewalls and prevent the squishy feeling? And running that low of pressure is going to heat those tires up much faster, isn't it?
 

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My current Cooper AT3 LTX's are doing very well carrying 3,200 lbs in the box. My previous Michelin AT2's handled well, but the tread was used up within 30,000 miles. Rear tires at 80 psi and fronts at 68 psi. Your only running 70 psi under load is causing your squirmy feeling, along with BFG's with soft tread.
 

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Well, I don't haul heavy, but to give you another option, I'm running the Michelin Agilis Cross climate tires. They were a huge improvement over the SRAs that came with the truck. They do have a bit of a winter rating to them. Granted, I'm dealing with NJ winters, so it's not as bad as what you have to deal with.
 

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What's the thought process behind a lower pressure though? Why wouldn't you want more air pressure to stiffen the sidewalls and prevent the squishy feeling? And running that low of pressure is going to heat those tires up much faster, isn't it?
Yes to all. And nobody needs to be guessing on their tire pressures. Get your loaded truck + trailer weighed (something everyone should do anyway who tows substantial weight) and inflate your tires to the proper PSI based on the weight the axles are actually carrying. Every major manufacturer has inflation charts that can usually be Googled, that will tell you exactly how much pressure to run under heavy loads. Technically the safest towing PSI is max (80 for most of ours), but that can make your ride much harsher than necessary. Running them too low will reduce control, cause them to potentially overheat, and increase the chances of failure or blowout.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My current Cooper AT3 LTX's are doing very well carrying 3,200 lbs in the box. My previous Michelin AT2's handled well, but the tread was used up within 30,000 miles. Rear tires at 80 psi and fronts at 68 psi. Your only running 70 psi under load is causing your squirmy feeling, along with BFG's with soft tread.
I always have run the bfgs at 80 psi when towing. I ran the Michelin’s that I had last summer at 70.

I did have a set of the Michelin LTX AT/2s on my old 1/2 ton and loved them but never towed anything but a small/light snowmobile trailer with that truck.
 
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