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Discussion Starter #1
So I've been doing some research on basic maintenance for the l5p, and I see that they've finally put the fuel filter in a more convenient access area. No more pulling the damn fender liner out and taking a tire off... took them long enough lol.

Now, onto my question: I see the filter is housed in a plastic case at the front of the tank on the underside of the truck, basically exposed to the elements. Have any of you guys that have put a lot of miles on these trucks had an issue with them cracking or anything like that? I'm a little worried about simply over tightening and causing it to crack.

I see h&s makes a nice billet replacement for only $90. Seems like relatively cheap insurance to me, but I've wasted money on things before that seemed like a good idea at the time.

Let the opinions flow!
 

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Lol. Yes, I see they have the nut on the bottom to apply a socket. The cracking, due to over tightening, was just one example of what could cause failure.

So, I'm putting Chevor in the "not worth it category"
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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Plastic isnt that durable, it's dirt cheap. Thats why the OEM's use it.

WIX makes a plastic fuel filter for the pre L5P trucks. There's plenty of horror stories on those, if you search.
 

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Lol. Yes, I see they have the nut on the bottom to apply a socket. The cracking, due to over tightening, was just one example of what could cause failure.

So, I'm putting Chevor in the "not worth it category"
It won't crack from over tightening. You will feel the filter seat and then don't go further. Unless your doing some serious off roading then I think the $90 is a waste of money. If you want insurance from it breaking then buy another one. That is what I did with the old WIF sensor in my LBZ.
 

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Torque setting are on the cover. Porsche and Mercedes both use plastic oil filter housings with no issues. I would expect the same from our fuel filter housing, especially since your not moving hot liquid through it.


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and it is only going to get worse.............The liberals say they don't want to ban guns, but CA now wants to try and tax them out of existence.

It is already illegal to ship even bullets for reloading to a residence. Have to be sent to a retailer.
 

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Don't think it's worth it. Have replaced 2 fuel filters on L5P and I see the metal bowl being an issue down the road with busted, stripped, or damaged threads in the filter head down the road.

The factory one has torque specs on it to help prevent messing up the filter head, along with the recessed water drain.
 

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I wouldn’t worry about the plastic part, more worried about the location. Today’s plastic parts can be bulletproof if made properly. I have a 2000 F350 7.3 and it’s fuel cap is plastic, and they don’t fail. Also have a 2005 VW TDI with the factory plastic oil filter cap, and they don’t fail either. The problem with going with a metal one, is how will dissimilar metals react with each other? I guess you could use some anti-seize on the threads just to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Never really thought about the metals reacting differently to each other.

After all this input, I think I'll save my $90 and keep faith in the GM engineers... fingers crossed lol
 

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I don't think I would put anti-seize on anything in the fuel system. Anything the MFG can find to void the warranty they will use. Also, with fuel pressures as high as they are, no telling what it will do with the anti-seize roaming around in the system.
 

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The way in which the o-ring seals in the L5P housing, it doesn't rely on tightening torque to seal. It seals between the inner diameter of the housing and outer diameter of the inner sleeve, so don't over torque.
 

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To answer a previous question asked about California Air Resources Board (CARB) aftermarket parts approval/denial, here is a link explaining what it takes to get approval to sell an aftermarket part in California; it is a short (LOL) 57 page explanation https://ww3.arb.ca.gov/msprog/aftermkt/vc27156procedures.pdf The amount of money, time, testing, and hope and prayers to get something approved to sell automotive parts in California is beyond ridiculous. There is no clear explanation from the state what constitutes something that really will modify emission or safety standards (the billet housing being a perfect example), so most aftermarket auto parts manufacturers will not deal with California and they make damn sure they let every purchaser know that it does not comply with California standards or the state will sue them! I tried to buy a K&N cold air system for my 94 Buick Roadmaster wagon from K&N at a Goodguys event in San Diego and they refused to sell it to me, so I rotated 360 degrees and asked for a 96 Chevrolet Impala SS which has the identical drivetrain, and only then they would sell me one. Catalytic converters are the biggest thorn because you have to purchase factory cats from i believe 1996 and up for 5 to 10 times what an aftermarket one costs, and the aftermarket ones are stamped 49 state or not California approved on them, and the new car factories can quit producing these after 10 years, and used ones are unlawful to resell! The smog test stations will inspect and reject if not in compliance because they face a 5 year prison sentence to do an illegal smog test. This is one of the hundreds of reasons why I ESCAPED California after 65 years.
 
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