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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I plan to order a 2024 2500 HD Duramax 4 x 4 as soon as my local dealership says I can.

Background: My wife and I are avid fishers. We will soon be retiring, and our dream is to travel around the U.S. and Canada towing our new 27' Airstream with our 15' aluminum boat (weighs 340 lbs) on the truck using a motorized Rear Boat Loader as per the pictures below.

We do plan to have a cab-height truck canopy.

This new truck will be my everyday vehicle, as well as our TV.

We do plan to install a Weight Distribution Hitch. TBD, which brand, etc.

Here are some questions/comments that I would greatly appreciate feedback on. Your input will help be configure my order for our new 2024 truck.

1. Payload: The tongue weight of the AS will be approximately 1,000. Assuming the Payload Capacity of the new truck is around 3,300 +/-, we should be fine with our total Payload, based on my spreadsheet with everything we plan to carry, including the boat on top and the weight of the boat loader rack itself.

2. Crew Cab vs. Double Cab and 8' bed vs. Standard Bed: With considerations in mind for every day driving and parking, and turn radius when towing the AS, I'm working on the pros/cons of overall body length, wheelbase, cargo storage in second row Cab area and bed cargo storage. We may need the 8' bed for cargo, and if so, we might go with the Double Cab to avoid such a long vehicle that would come with a CC + 8'.

3. Ride comfort is important. Our "senior bodies" will be logging alot of miles, so hoping that we don't have to sacrifice comfort for load capacity and safety.

4. The roof top Rear Boat Loader raises two primary concerns for me: (1) Top Heaviness and (2) Wind profile (side winds, etc.). In configuring my new truck order, are there options I could include to reduce those concerns? For example, would the F60 package with the Heavy Duty Front Springs be beneficial? If so, how much would that affect "comfort"? Other suggested configuration options?

5. If the F60 package is a good idea, does that reduce the Payload number on the driver's door jamb sticker, under the assumption that folks who order the F60 package will be using the truck for a slide-in Truck Camper.

6. I can't get an answer from my local dealer as to when I will be able to place my order or, what the anticipated lead time is for delivery.

OK, I'll stop there. I will greatly appreciate your insights/suggestions.

Cheers,

Bryan

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Piper One,

Thank you for your reply.

I'm certainly not locked into a 2500. If a 3500 is going to be a better overall option, then I'll go with that. But, I'd prefer to not spend the extra $ for the 3500 if I don't need to, and also have the stiffer ride, unloaded.

I didn't realize they post a Tongue Weight on the door sticker. I assume, however, perhaps wrongly, that the Tongue Weight on the 2500 would handle the 1,000 Tongue Weight of the Airstream.

As regards my concerns for the Boat Loader with Canopy Topper, let's assume the boat itself + the Boat Loader assembly will be approximately 500 - 600 lbs. And, let's assume the Canopy Topper is approximately 300 lbs.

As regards the Truck Bed, one of the Boat Loader companies wants an 8' Truck Bed for my boat and the other company says they can do it with a 6'9" bed or an 8' bed.

I'm pretty sure I don't want a Crew Cab + 8' bed. So, I'll probably go with a Double Cab Long Bed or a Crew Cab Regular Bed. TBD.

I live in the PNW (used to live in Montana) and we travel to Montana and Wyoming and other Western states on a regular basis. So, "yep", certainly do know about the winds, including on the mountain passes. If a 3500 really will make a significant difference (I'm not keen on "white knuckle" driving with this rig) then the extra $ and stiffer unloaded ride may be required.

I definitely am not looking to push the safety envelope. If it appears it really won't work, then we'll just have to leave the boat at home when we are towing our AS. Ugh. Yet, when I know that many folks are using their 2500s and 3500s for Truck Campers, which are heavier and have a significant side-wind profile, I have hope!!!!

Again, thank you for your input.

Cheers,

Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When your checking out what options you want for your new truck. Keep a eye out for options that are not going to be available yet at the beginning of the launch of the 2024 trucks. See if those options are worth waiting.
Ok, thanks, will do. Presumably (hopefully), my dealer will have that info so I can make an informed decision re: timing of my order.

Cheers,
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok, thanks for everyone's feedback.

Here are the numbers I have:

15' Boat: 320 lbs.

Rear Boat Loader: 200 lbs.

Canopy: 300 lbs

27' Airstream Trailer: 7,600 GVWR Tongue Weight: Most people with this model report an actual Tongue Weight of 1,000 lbs (+/- 100 lbs)

Payload: I got these numbers from the GMC 2024 2500 Printbook for a Duramax 4 x 4 and 20" wheels. I recognize that these are based on the standard equipment and they could be significantly lower with added options. Standard Bed/Crew Cab: 3,583 lbs. Long Bed/Crew Cab: 3,748. Standard Bed/Double Cab: 3,556. Long Bed/Double Cab: 3,738.

I recognize fully that the real Payload, as configured, and as displayed on the door jamb sticker is what counts. But, there are none availalbe (even 2023 models) locally for me to do some comparisons of.

So, is a Payload of 3,000 lbs a good assumption?

If the F60 package is designed, in part, to provide more "roll stability" could that be beneficial to counter cross-winds that would be hitting my boat and canopy?

Again, thank you for your help.

Cheers,

Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Piper One,

Thanks for your reply.

Airstream lists the "Net Carrying Capacity" of this trailer as 1,300 lbs. Thus, I assume the dry weight is 6,300. But, I will be checking these numbers and getting real data when I visit the Airstream dealer and get pictures of the capacity info on the stickers actually on the trailers that are similar (or identical) to what I'll be getting.

As regards the F60 package, since this is going to be my every day ride, I need to figure out if the potential benefits of the F60 package for my application (not a Truck Camper scenario) are worth the stiffer ride.

Again thanks. And yes, I'll post pics when this is all put together in reality!!

Cheers,

Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
jdwarren: Thanks for your feedback. Good comments.

According to the GMC print book for the 2024 2500 Duramax 4x4, the Rear Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) are as follows: CC (Long Bed or Standard Bed) = 6,600 lbs.; Double Cab (Long Bed or Standard Bed): 6,600 lbs.

long-time dmx: I'm pretty sure I'm not going to go with a CC Long Bed. Too much truck for my daily driving, etc. Plus, that extra length will limit some of the campground sites we like to use.

Thanks.

Cheers,

Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
jdwarren,

I'm new to this, but won't the "1000 lbs of boat/loader/canopy and maybe a few hundred pounds of tools and other stuff in the bed" as you mention, be partially distributed to the front axle (irrespective of the WDH)?

In other words, looking at the two photos I posted above of those two Rear Boat Loader racks (and my boat is a bit longer than either of those two boats), I would assume (perhaps incorrectly) that some of that load would be distributed to the front axle.

Cheers,
Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yep, understand.

So, even with no trailer hooked up and, thus no WDH engaged, some of the load from the boat, Loader rack, Canopy, and cargo in the bed (up near the Cab), will be distributed to the Front Axle, is that correct?

Cheers,
Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Agree on the minimal cost difference 2500->3500 and even going to a DRW if you feel like stretching things out a bit. If a SRW works for your needs, all the better though. I do have the F60 option and with all the crap roads that Colorado provides us in the winter, gotta say it still rides nice and provides a noticeable increase in handling when towing.
Is the F60 option on your 3500 DRW?

And you have a trailer you tow, not a truck camper?

Thanks.

Cheers,
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Love these conversations. Always learn something new.

I'm with others, I'd recommend the 3500. Sounds like this is a retirement vehicle, a lot of people have purchased a 2500 because it will manage what they are currently wanting to do for a bit less price only to find out 2 years later they can't do what they want to do because the next trailer is to heavy for the payload capacity of the 2500. Generally there is not much issue with rather a 2500 or 3500 will tow, it's the payload. To @jdwarren 's point, you could be potentially pushing the 2500 out of the gate once loaded up. The 3500 will also be more supportive to the cross winds. For the fun I just did the build and price on a Chevrolet 2500 and 3500 HC, CC, SB duramax, $1200 difference on the 23 models.

I have the 3500 crew cab standard bed, very pleased with the ride for what it's worth. 10 times smoother the 07 Dodge Ram 2500.

Just to be prepared in your mind, it was said elsewhere in the forum there is a possibility that the upper model trucks will only be offered in CC. Personally for traveling I love my CC, it's sitting room or a trunk or a bit of both.

For 900 lbs of boat/loader and topper mainly centered over the rear axle I would go for the smoother ride and not updated the front suspension. 900 lbs in this manner is a far cry from hanging a 1000 +/-lbs off the front of the truck like a plow or putting a 3-5k slide in camper in the back.

If you can manage with a CC SB it will be much more maneuverable vs the long bed. I was in awe at the shear size of our truck but impressed that she drives like a gentle giant and having the HD Surround camera system makes it only that much easier.

Heres a link that will provide some ordering insight if you haven't had to deal with it in. awhile.



Will look forward to hearing what you decide and seeing pics of this awesome setup.
Satar,

Great feedback, as from others. Thank you.

I will check out that link.

Because I may need an 8' bed for all the stuff needed for my boat, I was assuming I'd go with a Double Cab + 8' bed to avoid the "battleship" length of the CC + 8'. But, if it's true that the model I'm focused on, the SLT, is only available in a Crew Cab, then I will have to make the Regular Bed work.

Yep, this will indeed be our "retirement rig". Truck + Trailer + Boat traveling around the U.S. and Canada exploring new (and some old) fishing lakes and bays. That's the vision.

Cheers,

Bryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
If you can, test drive both lengths/configs, take them to an open parking lot and get someone to help you mark out what it does turning wise or at least watch the parking lines on the pavement to get an idea. It may not seem like much difference to some, to others its substantial. The wheelbase is what matters...and having the big battleship myself at 172" and a 160" and a 146" in other trucks....lets just say 2 of them park and go almost anywhere, one parks out back with the semi's a lot.
Yep, the challenge is going to be to find trucks in Dealer inventory to test drive!

The 2024 Print Book shows the following:

Wheelbase: CC Long Bed (172"); CC Standard Bed (159").

Turning Diameter, curb-to-curb: CC Long Bed (57'); CC Standard Bed (52.7').

Cheers,

Bryan
 
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