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Just about pulled the trigger on a 2020 high country 2500 and trade my 2015 LTZ 2500. Never thought to look up the payload, its a 2020 bigger, stronger more torque, tow more all the number are better right? Good thing I checked the sticker inside the door, the 2020 payload was a useless 1500lbs, my 2015 is 2200lbs , the same as my fifth wheel pin weight, both trucks loaded and same gvwr , obviously the 2020 needs to go on a diet . All I can figure is the larger cab on the 2020 sucks up 700lbs of payload. Anyone run into this?
For starters the manufacturers all deduct 150 lbs per passenger seat with a truck. That is why the highest payload capacity is always for the regular cab trucks. The payload is also a calculated rating based on how the truck was configured when it left the factory. Often the wheels and tires are the limiting factor and my 2011 2500HD had a greater factory payload rating at 2800 lbs than most of the 3500 trucks on the dealer lots.

The axles are rated at 11,000 lbs and the same ones are use on the 2500 and 3500 trucks. What is different is the leaf springs and the wheels and the tires. I swapped out the factory tires for Nitto ones and gained 1100 lbs of payload capacity at the rear axle. I added a double leaf set of SuperSprings and gained another 1400 lbs of load capacity. With a 4000 lb load in the bed the truck sits dead level and there is no sway in the curves.

I could gain even more payload capacity if I was willing to spend $3500 on a set of 19.5 wheels and tires for the truck but it is not really needed.
 

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For starters the manufacturers all deduct 150 lbs per passenger seat with a truck. That is why the highest payload capacity is always for the regular cab trucks. The payload is also a calculated rating based on how the truck was configured when it left the factory. Often the wheels and tires are the limiting factor and my 2011 2500HD had a greater factory payload rating at 2800 lbs than most of the 3500 trucks on the dealer lots.

The axles are rated at 11,000 lbs and the same ones are use on the 2500 and 3500 trucks. What is different is the leaf springs and the wheels and the tires. I swapped out the factory tires for Nitto ones and gained 1100 lbs of payload capacity at the rear axle. I added a double leaf set of SuperSprings and gained another 1400 lbs of load capacity. With a 4000 lb load in the bed the truck sits dead level and there is no sway in the curves.

I could gain even more payload capacity if I was willing to spend $3500 on a set of 19.5 wheels and tires for the truck but it is not really needed.
You gained no capacity rating from Super Springs. I agree with you on the tire ratings being a limiting factor; the 265/60R20’s on my 2018 only carry a 3,195lb rating.
 

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The reason a regular cab has a higher payload is they're lighter to start with like a gasser or a 2wd.
 

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You can choose the GVRW
10k, 10.6k, and 11,350 lbs. GVWR

My brother's sticker on his AT-4 says 3,152 lb cargo.

Definitely the nicest truck I've ever been in my life

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
Here's the sticker from my 2020 LTZ 2500HD. I do have 19.5 inch trims with load range H Toyo's, plus air bags just to get a level ride. Towing a 14k 5th wheel with no problems. BTW got a great deal on the truck and they gave me an excellent price for my 2015 2500HD LTZ.
1078474
 

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I don't have a picture handy but the GVWR on my 2020 CCLB is 11,550 pounds, it depends on how you option the truck!
 
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The lack of clarity on these ratings is ridiculous.

I have spent an inordinate amount of time running down my 16 single rear wheel lml ratings.

One would think GVCRW of 26k minus the truck (8k) would equ max fifth wheel capacity. Not according to the manual.

These ratings could use some better real world context.
 

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this is a hard lesson that many learn first hand. More than likely the 9900 lbs GVWR is for registration purposes and the truck can handle more payload.
full disclosure. I am not an engineer...
 

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I didn’t realize people actually gave a shit what the sticker says. You can learn something new everyday around here.
I forgot they had stickers with “recommendations”. If I need to put something in the bed, it goes in the bed. Lawyers make them go way under what the truck could do safely because of guys like me who “forget” there are recommendations. Numbers worriers probably also don’t exceed the speed limit because that’s unsafe of swerve across the yellow line to avoid potholes because that’s unsafe and never follow closer than 4.5 seconds and follow every other rule in the drivers safety’s manual. I hauled 3 tons in my 78 and it didn’t have near the braking capability or power that modern trucks have. 4000 lbs is nothing for a 3/4 ton truck no matter what stickers it has on it. It’s not a Honda Ridgeline for cryin out loud
 

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Good read for me this morning. Didn’t realize there are this many variations. Never thought to look at the sticker on my truck, if it fits it ships! :cool:
 

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I think it’s government regulation not to exceed 10,000lbs gvwr , so you end up witha payload less the weight of the truck, but in reality it can hold much more, check out the front and rear axle ratings and we know the rear tires are good for 7500 lbs , 11,990 with both axles curb weight is 8305 leaving 3685lbs spread across both axles. The rear could safely take two thirds of the 3685lbs, like 2300lbs, not sure but remember an RV guy telling me to worry more about the axle ratings
Anyone notice that the max tongue weight is =higher= than the max payload? I'm in the "watch RAWR / watch tire capacity" group, and hell with the payload. In almost all jurisdictions, the truck's weight ratings have a =lot= more to do with what you pay for your tags than what the truck's =actual= capabilities are. In my 15 years of RVing, I've found out that, for the fairly small difference in price, going from a 2500 to a SRW 3500 is really the way to go. Hell, there are newer 1/2 tons out there with more payload than my old '02 2500HD. I know a lot of people are =very= surprised when they're looking at Fords and see a 450 with =less= payload than a max-tow 350.

Lyle
 

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I didn’t realize people actually gave a shit what the sticker says. You can learn something new everyday around here.
You live in BC you damn sure =better= give a shit about those numbers. They =will= pull you over and weigh your rig. And not just the guys towing trailers so that it looks like their truck is spotlighting for bombers over London at night, either. They'll pull over just about =anybody= who's towing a large towable.

Lyle
 

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Have looked at a couple new 2500's and the payload sticker show 3154 lbs. The sales folks are clueless about this stuff.

Understand the wheels and tires are a factor, but what options do I want to watch out for?

Thinking I want to stay with the 18" tires versus the 20" to keep the height the same for towing the 5th wheel.

Thanks,
 
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My AT4 has every possible option like the Denali. I haven't had any issues with anything. This thing is incredible. I tow a 5th and the 20s aren't too high, IMO. However, with the 20s, it barely (2 or 3 inches) fits in my garage. But, yeah, there's nothing I'd change, although I only have 3500 miles. So, it's probably too soon to tell. So far, it's pure awesome. I came from a 2nd Gen Cummins, though. So, the transition is more drastic than most. Good luck.
 
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